The U.S. Army has selected BAE Systems to deliver two prototype vehicles for evaluation as a potential solution for the Cold Weather All-Terrain Vehicle (CATV) programme.

Whether operating in swamps or the frozen arctic, BAE Systems’ Beowulf is based on proven, existing solutions and capable of moving personnel and cargo under the most remote and harshest conditions.

“Beowulf is an unarmored, tracked, and highly versatile vehicle for carrying personnel and payloads in either of its two compartments across the most challenging terrains. Beowulf’s articulated mobility system is key to its effectiveness, allowing for optimal maneuverability across varying surfaces. It also has a modular design and can be reconfigured for multiple missions, such as logistical support, disaster and humanitarian relief, search and rescue, and other missions as required.”

Mark Signorelli, vice president of business development at BAE Systems, was quoted as saying:

“Beowulf is an optimal and mature solution for the CATV program and we look forward to submitting our prototypes with the goal of meeting the Army and Army National Guard’s mission.

Beowulf, and its armored sister vehicle, the BvS10, represent the most advanced vehicles in the world when it comes to operating anywhere, whether it’s snow, ice, rock, sand, mud, swamp, or steep mountainous environments. And its amphibious capability allows it to swim in flooded areas or coastal waters.”

Beowulf is based on the BvS10, which has already been produced, to include recent on time deliveries to Austria.

Multiple variants of the vehicle are already operating in five countries, first going into service with the Royal Marines in 2005.

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Steve
Steve
5 months ago

Wasn’t this one of the sets of vehicles that were abandoned due to cost after Afgan?

ChariotRider
ChariotRider
5 months ago
Reply to  Steve

Not sure if any were abandoned, but the Viking is the armoured variant and is in servcie with the Royal Marines according to the Royal Navy website.

Cheers CR

Rudeboy1
Rudeboy1
5 months ago
Reply to  Steve

The other contender for the US requirement is the Singaporean Bronco 3. This is a development of the STI Bronco 2 which was used in uparmoured form by the UK specifically for Afghanistan under the name Warthog, replacing the Viking, which was returned to the UK, upgraded to Viking 2 specification and is in use with the RM (as unlike Warthog they retained their amphibious capability). The Warthog fleet has been on sale by the MoD for some time with no takers so far. There was talk at one point of them being used for Watchkeeper ground stations and other… Read more »

pkcasimir
pkcasimir
5 months ago
Reply to  Rudeboy1

Oshkosh is the lead contractor for the Bronco3 in partnership with STEngineering and will furnish design tweaks for it. Oshkosh manufactures the JLTV and a number of other vehicles for the US Army and their vehicles are known for their reliability. I would place Oshkosh as the favorite at this point.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
5 months ago
Reply to  Steve

It appears so from these images. Let’s hope they learn to walk on water before the next defence review! 😂

03 March 2021

ROYAL MARINES TEST SKILLS IN MOVING ACROSS ARCTIC BATTLEFIELD

https://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/news-and-latest-activity/news/2021/march/03/210303-arctic-mobility

Last edited 5 months ago by Nigel Collins
Steve
Steve
5 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Isn’t that picture a viking and not a beowulf?

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
5 months ago
Reply to  Steve

One for the expert’s Steve, I was referring to the RM walking across the snow in my link in reply to your comment about possible cuts, i.e walking into battle as opposed to riding!

I’m not sure if this image will help you distinguish between the two?
comment image

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
5 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins
Steve
Steve
5 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

They had to do it in the falklands, so may as well practice it, although i never managed to get to the bottom of why as local farmers etc were able to operate in area with heavy vehicles

john
john
5 months ago
Reply to  Steve

My unit b sqn 5dg were tasked to go to Falklands, but a Royal Marine Capt who had sailed around the islands told the high ups that the ground was too boggy for tanks, so we were stood down. Would have been a hold different war with us there.

Rudeboy1
Rudeboy1
5 months ago
Reply to  john

A small number of Bvs did go, where they worked perfectly well…

Steve
Steve
5 months ago
Reply to  Rudeboy1

I guess there was shortage of transport options or I would have thought they would have sent every option they had just in case it was needed.

Karl
Karl
5 months ago
Reply to  Rudeboy1

Blues and Royals coped ok, saw a Centurion recovery if memory serves.

peter wait
peter wait
5 months ago

They should make the roof detachable for engine removal lol