According to a recent press release from Defence Equipment and Support (DE&S), the Typhoon Total Availability eNterprise (TyTAN) is playing a crucial role in maintaining the operational readiness of the Eurofighter Typhoon, the mainstay of UK combat air defence.

The aircraft and support teams are based at RAF Coningsby, RAF Lossiemouth, and other global locations including the British Forces South Atlantic Islands at Mount Pleasant.

TyTAN, a collaborative effort between DE&S, RAF, and BAE Systems, was initiated seven years ago to enhance the way the MOD and its industry partners manage the support and maintenance of the Typhoon fleet.

According to the release, this shift has resulted in a one-third reduction in the cost of support services while improving support levels for the UK Typhoon fleet.

Wg Cdr Simon Davies, DE&S TyTAN Service Delivery Manager, stated in the press release, “The TyTAN enterprise is unlike anything else I’ve worked on. Fundamental to its success is the embedded behaviours within the entire team where a culture of openness, transparency and honesty takes precedent.”

He emphasised the collaborative working environment between the MOD and industry partners and the collective focus on problem-solving.

TyTAN is responsible for a range of availability services, including training, maintenance, and 24/7 technical support. The release notes that the initiative has successfully met its contracted flying hours each year for the past seven years and aims to ensure the availability of 65-70 Typhoons at any given time for the seven front-line squadrons.

The press release also highlighted TyTAN’s problem-solving effectiveness through a case study on the Supersonic Fuel Tanks (SFTs) of the Typhoon jets. A dedicated team, termed the “Tiger team,” addressed the long-term technical issues with the SFTs, leading to a significant reduction in maintenance hours and improved availability of the tanks.

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Lisa has a degree in Media & Communication from Glasgow Caledonian University and works with industry news, sifting through press releases in addition to moderating website comments.
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Frank
Frank
18 days ago

“65-70 typhoons available at any given time for the seven front line squadrons”……… where to start.😧

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
18 days ago
Reply to  Frank

I won’t mention it again Frank, Honest 😂

Frank
Frank
18 days ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

😁

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
18 days ago
Reply to  Frank

That is a good number from the fleet available. Fleet managers from the 90’s would have killed for that kind of availability.

Frank
Frank
18 days ago
Reply to  Robert Blay

Yup, no argument there.

Enobob
Enobob
16 days ago
Reply to  Frank

When the air defence of the UK relied upon five Lightning squadrons you would not have had anything near that number instantly available at any given time!

Frank
Frank
18 days ago

Just had a little look on Google…. In 1989 the RAF listed the following aircraft in their inventory.
229 Tornado GR1.
165 F2/3.
100 Phantom FG1/2.
14 F3.
100 Jaguars.
80 Harriers.
94 GR5/7.
65 Buccaneers.
36 MR2 Nimrod.

Plus quite a few more including Tankers and Canberra’s.

Now I’m really depressed.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
18 days ago
Reply to  Frank

U.K. Does Not Have Enough Aircraft To Fight A War, Says Official Report Oct 5, 2023,09:01am EDT House Of Commons Defence Committe “The report emphasizes the importance of airpower to the nation — “Whether it be provision of UK Air Defence, global power projection, rapid delivery of humanitarian aid, strengthening relationships with our allies, or delivery of decisive and lethal action” – and the requirement for a sufficiently large and balanced fleet of aircraft to carry out all the necessary missions this entails. The biggest concern is with ‘combat mass’ and the sharp reduction in the number of aircraft available… Read more »

Last edited 18 days ago by Nigel Collins
Alabama Boy
Alabama Boy
18 days ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

No mention of the improvement in capability of hostile aircraft. Potential enemy’s havn’t stood still whilst we have run down our Air Force. One F35B is still only one platform and cannot be operating in two places at once no matter how capable. So, numbers are important not only for weight of response (or mass) but to be able to operate across a broad front. This is where the numbers of P8s and E7s are particularly important as these platforms are very good “force multipliers” able to direct scarce resources to the place of maximum, or best, impact. But if… Read more »

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
18 days ago
Reply to  Alabama Boy

And while we sleep!China’s air force modernisation: gaining pace “China continues to build more and better combat aircraft as the air force continues to replace ageing aircraft with considerably more capable types: the Chengdu J-10C and J-20 and the Shenyang J-16 are increasingly at the core of Chinese air power. The 2023 edition of The Military Balance tracks further improvements to China’s air force inventory. The People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF) is adding combat aircraft at pace. It also continues to integrate onto its aircraft a range of capable air-to-air missiles and China’s defence industry is developing a new… Read more »

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
18 days ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

And how many of the 600 are available on any given day? What’s the average monthly flying hours? Figures you will never know or released from the Chinese. Because they will be very low.

Netking
Netking
18 days ago
Reply to  Robert Blay

I wouldn’t underestimate China. They are not there yet but they are catching up quickly. They are not short on manpower or economic resources to continue their huge leap forward in capability.

Frank
Frank
18 days ago
Reply to  Robert Blay

So you are saying we will never know yet you are also saying that you do then ? …… Please share with us what you know….

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
17 days ago
Reply to  Frank

Hi Frank, At a Glance In April 2022, the Congressional Budget Office published Availability and Use of F-35 Fighter Aircraft. That report used data through September 2021, the last month of fiscal year 2021. This update incorporates data for fiscal year 2022 and employs CBO’s recently developed approach for measuring the effects of aging on aircraft. Availability and Use in Fiscal Year 2022. In 2022, F-35Cs’ availability and flying hours per aircraft exceeded those of F-35As and F-35Bs. F-35Cs’ availability increased in 2022; F-35As’ and F-35Bs’ availability decreased. Flying hours per aircraft increased slightly for all three fleets. Full Mission Availability Rates. F-35As… Read more »

Frank
Frank
17 days ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

It was Roberts comment about Chinese aircraft availability that I was referring to….. He said “We would never know” yet he then said it would be very low….. which is a contradiction. All I know is they can send Dozens of Aircraft around Taiwan at a time and this happens so many times. The Chinese Airforce, has @ 4000 Aircraft including @2500 Strike and their Navy has@ 700. On top of this they have 3 Carriers and dozens of modern Destroyers, Frigates and Submarines plus many other craft.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
17 days ago
Reply to  Frank

I’m sure he will be able to give us a breakdown and supply us with the numbers!

Darryl2164
Darryl2164
17 days ago
Reply to  Alabama Boy

An also you would need to factor in attrition , some would be bound to be lost in conflict

Frank
Frank
18 days ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Exactly. Quite how people think the numbers are even remotely adequate is beyond me.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
18 days ago
Reply to  Frank

Likewise. “While China’s nuclear capabilities grow, it is also updating its air fleet. The People’s Liberation Army Air Force”. The Pentagon report noted that “the PLAAF, “in particular, has received repeated calls from its leadership to become a truly ‘strategic’ air force, able to project power at long distances to advance and defend the PRC’s global interests.”   To do so, the report said, the PLAAF is investing in:  Upgrades to its fifth-generation J-20 fighter Developing its H-20 bomber, projected to have both nuclear and conventional roles  “New medium- and long-range stealth bombers to strike regional and global targets.” On top… Read more »

Frank
Frank
18 days ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Yes I follow the Chinese military build up quite closely…. the PLAN more closely and It’s staggering build pace…… There is just one reason they doing this…… Why can’t the West wake up and smell the Yunnan Coffee ?

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
18 days ago
Reply to  Frank

Far too busy with the Longjing green tea!

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
18 days ago
Reply to  Frank

From 2030. Over 500 F35’s will be operational services across EU nations and the UK. Not including USAF assets. Plus, all the other fast jets types in service. Typhoon, Rafale ect. Or F35’s in service globally. China has nothing close to that level of capability. 19 warships will be 5th gen capable. China. Zero. They are years away from a credible carrier force because it takes years to build up the experience and capability. Just ask the US Navy about that. All these fighters are cheap copy cats of western products. or 1970/80 Russian designs. They might look nice on… Read more »

Frank
Frank
18 days ago
Reply to  Robert Blay

Oh Ok then….. 🙄

Marked
Marked
17 days ago
Reply to  Frank

Talking his usual crap, it’s not that long ago he told me the Royal Navy wants for nothing. Seriously you couldn’t make it up!

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
17 days ago
Reply to  Marked

😂

George Amery
George Amery
18 days ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Good point Nigel. Also in the event of us locking horns with China, would they be able to send and sustain an air attack on the UK? From my little understanding of military issues, I’m guessing they would struggle to attack the UK from the skies. The sea using subs may be a different scenario. Before any surface navel fleet got anywhere near the UK, they would be sunk. However, as with many on this site, I agree we have few air frame numbers that gives us all concerns about deployment and at the same time protecting our national interests… Read more »

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
18 days ago
Reply to  George Amery

Good afternoon George, From Russia, yes there is a growing relationship between both countries.

Also.

19 Oct 2023
Department Of Defence (DOD)

“The Chinese military is looking for bases overseas and looking to develop the resources needed to be a globally relevant force.

They have established an overall logistics command and they are working hand-in-glove with the Belt and Road Initiative to gain access.”

All the very best!

Frank
Frank
18 days ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Africa and South America are Ripe for the picking…. China is the next big Global influence in the making and the pace of their military build up reflects this…..

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
17 days ago
Reply to  Frank

Exactly, but try telling that to some on here🙄

Netking
Netking
18 days ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

At the rate of their build up, I predict the world will see a plan CSG take a tour of friendly nations in the Atlantic in less than a decade.

Frank
Frank
18 days ago
Reply to  Netking

And I wouldn’t be surprised either…. China has a lot of historical “Beef” with the west…… we should be taking note.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
17 days ago
Reply to  Netking

Indeed.

11 Oct 2023
“The PLAN’s overall battle force is expected to grow to 400 ships by 2025 and 440 ships by 2030.”

grizzler
grizzler
18 days ago
Reply to  Frank

Thats as may be yes …but don’t forget 1 Typhoon is equal to 10 x other aircraft and forget the 20 or so F35B we have …and of course once Tempest becomes operation it will be equal to 50 x…
Now as long as not every one starts anything not all at once we may be OK ….

Frank
Frank
18 days ago
Reply to  grizzler

Yes, this is what we hear all the time and some on here seem to believe it too.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
18 days ago
Reply to  grizzler

Is that all? 😂

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
18 days ago
Reply to  Frank

Yet 70 Typhoons presents a far more capable force than any of those combined.

Frank
Frank
18 days ago
Reply to  Robert Blay

So you are happy with this then ?

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
18 days ago
Reply to  Frank

I’m happy that our capability, along with the US and NATO allies, is more than a match for China. China cannot match the west with conventional capability. Some of you are fooled by the Chinese propaganda.

Frank
Frank
18 days ago
Reply to  Robert Blay

So I’m a Fool then ?

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
17 days ago
Reply to  Frank

No Frank. I’m just being realistic. Has everyone suddenly forgotten just how capable the Americans are on their own? The very capable Force’s from South Korea and Japan, Malaysia and Australia ect. All with very capable western equipment. F35’s P8’s F15’s F16’s ect ect. It isn’t going to be the RAF deploying 20 Typhoons to the far side of the world to face down China on its own. Same way you won’t be seeing any Chinese fleets sailing up the English Channel anytime soon. When it comes to China or any other major unfriendly nation. It isn’t going to be… Read more »

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
18 days ago
Reply to  Frank

And out of all those fleets. Only a tiny number would be available on any given day. In op Telic in 2003. We deployed 32 Tornado GR4’s, 12 F3s, and 12 Harrier GR7. Today, we could match those numbers, but with far superior capability.

Frank
Frank
18 days ago
Reply to  Robert Blay

Well If you are happy in your thoughts that’s all that really matters…

Marked
Marked
17 days ago
Reply to  Robert Blay

Bollocks we could! That would leave nothing here for QRA let alone Falklands, Cyprus etc. Struggle with numbers do you?

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
17 days ago
Reply to  Marked

I don’t know what fantasy war is going on in your head. But we are part of something called NATO. And allies called the Americans. Or did you forget about them.

monkey spanker
monkey spanker
17 days ago
Reply to  Marked

No that could be deployed. 56 aircraft out of 100 typhoons and 32 F35b.
The article says 65-70 typhoons are available each day. That leaves enough for 4 at falklands, U.K. QRA
Now out of those 56 aircraft deployed in op telic not all were available everyday. Would be a good day if half the tornados were ready to fly everyday.
Also there are the reaper fleet that weren’t available for op telic to add in to numbers.
Granted it leaves it tight but manageable for while.

Louis
Louis
16 days ago
Reply to  Marked

Funnily enough, Cyprus does not need Typhoons permanently stationed on it.
4 Typhoons in Falklands, not all are available.

56 out of ~160 would be achievable.

Ryan Brewis
Ryan Brewis
17 days ago
Reply to  Frank

Roughly 300 fighters, 600 strike. I’d be happy if we had even a quarter of that now

Frank
Frank
17 days ago
Reply to  Ryan Brewis

Apparently we don’t need any more as we have the Americans and NATO minding our backs. 🙄

Marked
Marked
18 days ago

Pathetic numbers. In war so many would be engaged in uk air defence there would be nothing left to support the fight in Europe.

We no longer have an air force. Its a glorified local defence force.

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
18 days ago
Reply to  Marked

Give over.

Marked
Marked
18 days ago
Reply to  Robert Blay

You can’t see what’s at the end of your nose, totally clueless.

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
17 days ago
Reply to  Marked

I am realistic. With experience to back it up.

Marked
Marked
17 days ago
Reply to  Robert Blay

Pmsl, of course you have, of course.

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
17 days ago
Reply to  Marked

Stick to Facebook pal.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
17 days ago
Reply to  Marked

He has, as it happens. Look him up. Like me, Robert does not hide his identity on this site, but uses his real name. He has a long career in the Fleet Air Arm which is obvious to even the most cursory search.

Frank
Frank
17 days ago

Does he have a long bushy beard as well ? 😂😂

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
17 days ago
Reply to  Frank

Unlike you, no!

Frank62
Frank62
17 days ago
Reply to  Robert Blay

Wake up & smell the coffee Robert. Our forces are at a historic nadir & the Tories have wrecked UK society.

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
17 days ago
Reply to  Frank62

I don’t need to wake up and smell anything. I am very aware of what our Force’s can and cannot do. What is being spent on what, and what needs more investment. We have capabilities many just don’t understand. And we can achieve things only bettered or matched by the Americans. And I’m not talking about mass. But capability. As for your politics. That’s up to you. Its a free country.

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
18 days ago
Reply to  Marked

That’s the real concern in my view, it’s all inter-connected, less destroyers results in more pressure on Typhoons covering the UK against air attack. I really can only guess, but how many active Typhoons would be required to do that UK coverage considering you will have to overload somewhat to cater for attacks from the high North? Quite a few I suspect, plus in any conflict overworked aircraft will almost certainly lead to reduced availability. Again I can only guess as to how many would be available to operate in Norway to intercept aircraft early from the most likely danger… Read more »

Last edited 18 days ago by Spyinthesky
Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
18 days ago
Reply to  Spyinthesky

Not just aircraft. The ASCS CRCs (Control and Reporting Centre ) that direct those aircraft were reduced in the early 2000s from 3, plus a reserve, to 2, and one of those is in a surface building.
The attached radar sites ( RRH – Remote Radar Head ) are still pretty much intact.
Without the radar and control elements it matters not if we have 70 or 200 Typhoons.
11 Group needs an uplift.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
18 days ago
Reply to  Marked

Bit of an over exaggeration, Marked. Too small, yes, but a local defence force, no.

ABCRodney
ABCRodney
18 days ago

Hi M8, Scratch your head time ! Butother than useless outsourced support businesses, Senior Officers and MOD Civil servants can you actually name a single item the Defence Establishment has anywhere near enough of ? Other than Water and Air (Hot or Cold) I’m stumped to think of even one.🤔 As for the combat Aircraft right now we have zero on order past the remaining F35B deliveries. So as of 2025 with the Tranche 1 going we will have just 107 Tranche 2 / 3 Typhoons and 45 F35B. Take out the 1/3 rule and that leaves just 100 fast… Read more »

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
18 days ago
Reply to  ABCRodney

I fully agree mate. Add extra P8 to that.
With regards Italy, Spain, Germany jet numbers it must be acknowledged all lack an SSN, SSBN fleet and supporting nuclear infrastructure. A subject I know you’re not only extremely well informed in, but have personal experience with.

So one for one comparisons do not always work.

As for those increments I’m no longer looking at this government but the next one. Hopefully some of that list will come to pass.

What does defence have enough of??? I’d have to think….there must be something!

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
17 days ago

Special Force’s 👍

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
17 days ago
Reply to  Robert Blay

Hi pal. Hmmm, not sure. The supporting infrastructure has expanded, yes, as have the formations ( 18, SRR, and ** ) from Cold War days, but actual badged bodies I don’t know, and doubt given the reduction in the pool from which they come. We remain capable of global, short notice deployment in various areas, which many a European nation cannot, with the logistical and ISTAR tail too. Even with our modest numbers. But keeping these deployments going on an enduring basis is another matter, as the mass has gone. Which is why although I questioned Marked comment on HM… Read more »

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
17 days ago

I think we both know, the number of manned fighters is only going in one direction. With capability going up. Tempest will be in small numbers, the manned version anyway, with mass coming from unmanned and drones/loyal wingman ect. Even NGAD is only expected onto be made up of 200 airframes. Despite the doom that every everyone is reveling in. We could deploy 24 F35’s and 30 or 40 Typhoons. Now to some that’s a small number. In the real world, that’s a massive capability. Could we sustain that long term, no, we could not. But nobody else could either… Read more »

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
17 days ago
Reply to  Robert Blay

Hi mate. I appreciate all that, and agree, as you know, regards capability. Numbers remain my beef, I cannot get away from that.
On China, I don’t know any more. They might not want WW3, but if they go for Taiwan that depends on the wests response doesn’t it.

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
17 days ago

We can only hope that, ultimately, China will decide that trying to invade Taiwan will result in not only a massive loss of life wnd pointless destruction. But also an enormous hit on it’s economy, and isolated from the rest of the world. And that it isn’t worth it in the slightest. China’s military build rate is scary. But we both know those numbers are nothing without experience and training. And the yanks would wipe the floor with them. And copy cat technology will only get you so far. Communist regimes will ultimately fail. I’d give it 25 years before… Read more »

Last edited 17 days ago by Robert Blay
ABCRodney
ABCRodney
17 days ago

You’re not wrong Quality is a game changer but quantity stretches it and maybe too far. I believe China doesn’t want WW3 but then their country has 3000 years of History so can just afford to wait for an opportunity with an acceptable risk. If Taiwan is the objective then they have to negate the US ability to react in time to make any difference. And given its less than 80 miles away from China the odds a pretty badly stacked against anyone them able to do anything before it’s all over. The present Salami Slicing tactics involving multiple sideshows… Read more »

Marked
Marked
17 days ago

We can do small gestures from Cyprus to make a point, but as far as offering a credible force we can deploy? No chance.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
17 days ago
Reply to  Marked

Yes, for that requires CSG. Which may yet arrive.
By comparison, who else in the EU nations has deployed?

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
17 days ago
Reply to  Marked

Flying 3000 miles from Cyprus to hit multiple targets with pinpoint accuracy day or night in any weather is not a small gesture.

ABCRodney
ABCRodney
17 days ago
Reply to  Robert Blay

It is a Political inspired gesture and yet again a “solution” has been pulled out of the hat to make that possible. What it reinforces is what we can do with so little, it’s but it also an amazing demonstration of capability, planning and sheer professionalism. Yep it was doable and has been repeated but it really can’t be defended as a sensible idea other than it was the only option available. The idea of 4 single seat aircraft flying over 3000 miles at night, involving multiple Air to Air Refueling and hitting an enemy target half way through is… Read more »

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
17 days ago
Reply to  ABCRodney

It is an outstanding operation those Typhoons are conducting, in the very best traditions of the RAF. Those are sensible numbers. But unfortunately, I don’t think k the RAF would go for more Typhoons. Especially when £2.35 Bn is being spent on upgrading them. Serious cash. F35 numbers do need to be up into the 70’s range, and they can provide a huge capability. Agree with E7 and P8. 5 and 12 should be the minimum. I’d also up Protector to 26.

Alan Reid
Alan Reid
11 days ago
Reply to  Robert Blay

Just to add to the comments of my old pal, Daniele. I always find your commentary very interesting, Robert. Based on my sums, we’ve currently got 137 Typhoons in the RAF fleet. That will drop to 107 next year with the retiral of the 30 Tranche1s. Someone much more intelligent than me once said that, “quantity has it own quality” (or something like that!). ** Is there an advantage in running those Tranche1s on for a few more years (albeit with some additional funding)? ** Because in doing so, by quickly responding to growing international tension – the MoD would… Read more »

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
11 days ago
Reply to  Alan Reid

Good morning Allan. Yes, mass does have a quality of its own. Especially for enduring operations. I try and base my comments on reality rather than fantasy fleets and budgets. With T1 Typhoons it comes down to cash. T1 is still very capable. But it is a very different aircraft from the T2/3 fleets. Its a fleet within a fleet. Much of the equipment is now becoming obsolete and very expensive to maintain and operate. It requires a different training and engineering pipeline compared to the T2/3 fleet. Basically, the RAF are getting far less return in terms of capability… Read more »

Alan Reid
Alan Reid
10 days ago
Reply to  Robert Blay

It does help, Robert, many thanks.
I mistakenly had believed that the Tranche 1s were on the front-line. The rationale in breaking them down for spares does make more sense now.
Thanks very much for taking the time to give me such a detailed response. 👍

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
10 days ago
Reply to  Alan Reid

Always alot of misunderstanding on some of these topics. And the reasons behind the decisions made by the RAF/MOD are not as simple as they seem. The RAF will always go for capability over numbers when the budget available doesn’t allow for both. That way our Typhoons and F35B’s sit at the top of the tree alongside USAF assets. Capability brings options and influence. And some of our EU allies with slightly better numbers, will still be in the championship compared to the Premier league. 👍

FOSTERSMAN
FOSTERSMAN
18 days ago
Reply to  Marked

As the war in Ukraine shows it’s not the shiny toys sitting on the runway ready to go that wins wars it’s what’s stuffed in the hangers and warehousing that will ultimately decide the fate of a nation. Unfortunately in a peer on peer fight you are most likely to lose most of your available fleet in the initial stages and unlike Russia who we all like to troll, we don’t have a reserve of any aircraft, warships or pretty much any ground vehicles of note. We would be very hard pressed in a proper jostle to sustain any large… Read more »

Quentin D63
Quentin D63
16 days ago
Reply to  FOSTERSMAN

Our secret weapon, the will of the people to fight for their freedoms, democratic values and just causes against oppression and bully boys.

Joe16
Joe16
18 days ago

I wonder what that 33% reduction in costs has done to the cost per flight hour for Typhoon- must be pretty good. I doubt we’ll get any new orders off of it at this stage of the game, but good nonetheless. Money saved here can be spent elsewhere. As far as numbers, sure we could do with more- no argument there. But Wikipedia tells me we have 137 airframes remaining, with 102 in service. Maintaining a constant availability of 70 airframes for the frontline squadrons gives a 70% rate, which is really quite good I believe. But, let’s for a… Read more »

FOSTERSMAN
FOSTERSMAN
18 days ago
Reply to  Joe16

In the Ukrainian war in the first few days the russians were lobbing 100s of cruise missiles a day at strategic sites to overwhelm and disoriente the defenders, we don’t have any active ABM sites so logic would say we could lose a large percentage on those first few days. What’s the plan once most AD radars are lost and the front line airbases got craters in them? At the same time the largest cyber attack in history wipes out our power generation and communication which at the very least crashes the stock market and causes mass panic to the… Read more »

Joe16
Joe16
17 days ago
Reply to  FOSTERSMAN

OK, so at least half of what you’re talking about has nothing to do with Typhoon and general numbers of aircraft in the air force; quick reaction interceptors do nothing against cyber attack. If you think that we’ll be making kinetic retaliation strikes into Russia proper with squadrons of Typhoons, then I find that unlikely too- the country is simply too big to effectively hit sufficient critical targets to do anything. We have what I understand to be a very capable AD radar network, which is linked up with those of other NATO countries; one of the big problems that… Read more »

FOSTERSMAN
FOSTERSMAN
16 days ago
Reply to  Joe16

What if a future war is not with Russia but another nation, how does the Norwegian F35s and US air force defend the UK if the war isn’t yet with NATO? and we know how unreliable the alliance was pre russian invasion. To deter Russia unfortunately we are going to need to park our typhoons far as east as we dair to give russian planners something to worry over. We might just be ok with QRA number but as you know with commitments to the Falklands and Cyprus along with a burdensome strike missions in Yemen the RAF is going… Read more »

ABCRodney
ABCRodney
17 days ago
Reply to  Joe16

What you missed is that once the Tranche 1 go in 2025 we only have 107 left. Do the Math and just remember that those airframes have to cover the same number of tasks as tge present force. So they get hammered and use Air Frame life quicker.
The USN has found that that the availability of their F18C/D are significantly lower than the proceeding A/B at the same point in the lifespan. Much higher usage will do that, which is why I don’t drive an ex Taxi.

Joe16
Joe16
17 days ago
Reply to  ABCRodney

The numbers I worked from did account for the 102 in-service aircraft that I found reference to.
But you raise an excellent point about airframe degradation that I had neglected. I’m not against getting more Typhoon, and I do think that our deployments in Akrotiri and the Baltics should be increased to two “expeditionary” squadrons- which would require additional airframes.
Maybe I should refine my stance to be: we have sufficient airframes for maintaining the defence of UK airspace, and should ensure that availability is maintained through procuring sufficient spares/ replacement airframes as the fleet ages.

Wyn Beynon
Wyn Beynon
17 days ago

Having read various moans on here about aircraft serviceability i decided to use FlightRadar24 to see what I could see. I’ve been “spotting” RAF Typhoons on ADS-B radar – which anyone can do. There are, in the past 10 weeks or so at least 70 individual airframes flying through that time (the Falklands Typhoons don’t use transponders much so I haven’t logged their serials.) So that fits with what the report states. I’ve “spotted” all but one KC2 & KC3s and all but one AirTanker A300 – they are very busy aeroplanes. Similarly A400 Atlas – 17 airframes flying in… Read more »

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
17 days ago
Reply to  Wyn Beynon

UK Parliament
Written questions and answers
8 September 2023

The average monthly flying hours for the F-35B Lightning

F-35B Lightning
Financial Year: 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23
160 140 210 180

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
17 days ago
Reply to  Wyn Beynon

Interesting observations, thank you.

Darryl2164
Darryl2164
17 days ago

Wow , nice to know we have such a large air force defending us . I,ll sleep safely in my bed !!!!!!