Rolls-Royce has announced that infrastructure group Balfour Beatty will be its non-fissile construction partner to help deliver the expansion of its Raynesway site in Derby, according to a press release.

In June of last year, Rolls-Royce revealed plans to double the size of its Submarines site in Derby to meet growing demand from the Royal Navy and in response to the AUKUS agreement.

This expansion is part of a broader strategy to support the UK’s SSN-AUKUS programme, with Australia committing £2.4 billion over ten years to the initiative. This funding will support the enhancement of Rolls-Royce Submarines infrastructure and contribute to costs associated with boat design.

The expansion will involve the construction of new manufacturing and office facilities, creating 1,170 skilled roles in various disciplines, including manufacturing and engineering. Balfour Beatty will oversee the construction of these new facilities and the adjoining site infrastructure.

“We cannot deliver against our commitments to the MOD and the AUKUS programme on our own. It will require a strong and reliable supply chain bringing their expertise to enhance and enable the critical work we do. The selection of Balfour Beatty as our expansion construction partner is a prime example of that,” said Terry Meighan, Rolls-Royce Submarines Infrastructure Director.

“Their experience in delivering major infrastructure, as well as their long history of complex project delivery in secure environments, were important factors in our decision. This is an exciting milestone as we grow our site and our business to meet the enhanced demand for our expertise.”

Leo Quinn, Balfour Beatty’s Group Chief Executive, added, “Today’s announcement marks an important step forward in ensuring Rolls-Royce has the infrastructure in place to support the strategic requirements of the MOD and the AUKUS programmes. I’m delighted Balfour Beatty has been chosen to support this critical work for a project that will see us unite our unique multi-disciplinary expertise and experience in delivering large scale complex projects within live, operational nuclear environments.”

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Lisa has a degree in Media & Communication from Glasgow Caledonian University and works with industry news, sifting through press releases in addition to moderating website comments.
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Chris
Chris (@guest_821549)
1 month ago

Never heard of her

FormerUSAF
FormerUSAF (@guest_821614)
1 month ago
Reply to  Chris

ABCRodney is uniquely qualified to comment on this article. Any thoughts, sir?

Robbo
Robbo (@guest_821664)
1 month ago
Reply to  FormerUSAF

As an ex-submariner it doesn’t take an expert to write on constructing a construction site for constructing SSN’s. Basically it’s a shipyard, a specialised shipyard, but it’s still a shipyard.

Peter Feltham
Peter Feltham (@guest_821679)
1 month ago
Reply to  Robbo

Dead right.

Robbo
Robbo (@guest_821688)
1 month ago
Reply to  Peter Feltham

Thanks mate

ABCRodney
ABCRodney (@guest_821933)
1 month ago
Reply to  Robbo

I wouldn’t comment about a construction site, but one that builds nuclear reactors and the producing the Fuel pellets isn’t anything like a ship yard. It’s an odd beast, it’s more like a cross between a high tech precision engineering facility, a Swiss watch maker and a Chemical Laboratory. You say you are an ex submariner well in that case I hope RRs products worked OK for you as 2 generations of my family have been building them. If you actually want to know the difference between a shipyard and RR I’ll tell you ! If a shipyard gets it… Read more »

Robbo
Robbo (@guest_821981)
1 month ago
Reply to  ABCRodney

You are absolutely correct mate. My experience was the Cold War era and deisel electrics (Oberons) and I actually did some of my initial training on HMS Auriga a WW2 A Boat. I never qualified on nukes but knew of the safety standards employed (no luminous dial watches, discharge restrictions etc etc). So not much knowledge about the RR PWR3. No, I imagine stuffing up the fissile fuel pellets would have catastrophic effect? But I was just talking about the actual building of submarine pressure hulls, internal fit out and other watertight fittings. The problem like building any modern submarines… Read more »

ABCRodney
ABCRodney (@guest_822044)
1 month ago
Reply to  Robbo

Have you ever been to Barrow and seen the sheer size of the Devonshire Dock Hall it’s bloody huge. As for the importance of the highly trained workforce it’s absolutely vital that there is 100% continuity in the build schedule. FYI when the Vanguards were built the workforce at BAe Barrow was about 13,000, 2 years later it was just 3000. For 7 long years no subs were built, just the Bays and the knock on into the supply chain was horrendous. Then when they finally ordered the Astutes the problems and costs to regenerate the industry were in the… Read more »

Robbo
Robbo (@guest_822088)
1 month ago
Reply to  ABCRodney

No mate, my experience was the Scottish yards for the Oberons ( the Australian ones). Blockhouse at Portsmouth, HMS Dolphin (submarine school) and Faslane a handful of times. That’s it in the UK. The rest of my time in boats pushing Oberons around SE Asia, NZ and Singapore numerous times, HK, (still a UK protectorate), Philippines, Malaysia, Vietnamese waters twice and Hawaii for RIMPAC. Too many weeks at sea over too few years and that’s why I got out and retrained in a completely different field to make absolutely sure I NEVER went to sea again, especially on a submarine.

ABCRodney
ABCRodney (@guest_822120)
1 month ago
Reply to  Robbo

It’s actually worth a visit and the Museum is wonderful. If your ever in the Lakes go have a gander. 😉

Robbo
Robbo (@guest_822123)
1 month ago
Reply to  ABCRodney

Will keep it mind next time I’m over in the UK….thanks.

ABCRodney
ABCRodney (@guest_821923)
1 month ago
Reply to  FormerUSAF

Yep I just wonder how they kept a straight face, Balfour Beatty have been the go to contractor for work at Raynesway since it was 1st established in the 50/60’s. They have the necessary clearances, a unique understanding of how the site works and a relationship of trust. And as for it being news it really isn’t, as the place has been a building site for the last 2 Years and the piling was done before AUKUS was even officially announced. To be fair a lot is made of the huge sums being poured into the UK Nuclear Naval Industry… Read more »

Lee H
Lee H (@guest_821596)
1 month ago

Rolls Royce and the MoD – with a solid track record of delivery.
Where the contractor gets paid for the delay.

https://www.nuclearinfo.org/blog/david-cullen/2020/07/reports-highlight-repeated-failures-mod-over-four-decades