The Theodore Roosevelt Carrier Strike Group and the Makin Island Amphibious Ready Group joined forces in the South China Sea to conduct Expeditionary Strike Force operations, say the U.S. Navy.

Ships and aircraft from both strike groups coordinated operations in international waters and conducted multi-domain naval integration exercises in support of a free and open Indo-Pacific.

“Combining the capabilities of the carrier strike group with those of the Makin Island Amphibious Ready Group sharpens our tactical skills and demonstrates our continued dedication to the security and prosperity of the Indo-Pacific,” said Rear Adm. Doug Verissimo, commander, Carrier Strike Group Nine.

“The combined Navy and Marine Corps team has been a stabilizing force in this region for more than a century and will continue to support all who share in the collective vision of peace, stability, and freedom of the seas.”

According to the U.S. Navy news release:

“The Theodore Roosevelt Carrier Strike Group consists of USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71), Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 11, the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Bunker Hill (CG 52), Destroyer Squadron 23, and the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Russell (DDG 59).

The Makin Island ARG is comprised of three ships; amphibious assault ship USS Makin Island (LHD 8), amphibious transport dock ship USS Somerset (LPD 25), amphibious transport dock ship USS San Diego (LPD 22); and detachments from the “Wildcards” of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 23, “Scorpions” of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 49, Tactical Air Control Squadron (VTC) 11, and Assault Craft Unit (ACU) 5.”

4 2 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
37 Comments
oldest
newest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments

Andrew D
21 days ago

Hope it keeps the Chinese at bay and think twice

Gareth
Gareth
21 days ago

Be great if there’s a US CSG in the SCS when QE goes there and they link up. That would be quite a sight, and a powerful message, especially if there are a large number of international ships involved.

Gunbuster
Gunbuster
21 days ago

Makin ARG was recently in the Gulf. One of the 2 LPDs attached to the group along with a Tico, had a huge COVID issue and spent a good 3 weeks alongside while they contained and isolated the crews. So, because I am bored, the weather is hot and windy (Which means lots of dust so I cannot paint the hull of the ship I am working on) I will throw this cat amongst the pigeons… A USN CVN and its being escorted by 1 Tico and 3 ABs , no doubt a sub is there as well and it… Read more »

Daveyb
Daveyb
21 days ago
Reply to  Gunbuster

He pulls the pin and rolls in the grenade through the open door…..

Gunbuster
Gunbuster
21 days ago
Reply to  Daveyb

Covers his ears, leaves his mouth open….BANG…then runs away and hides giggling to himself…
What do you expect …its Virtual Friday tomorrow and ramadan has started so I cannot get a beer except at home!

And for info there are currently 2 ABs alongside from the Eisenhower CVN group which means she is now sailing around in the NAG with only 2 ABs and a Tico as escort!

Shock Horror!

Last edited 21 days ago by Gunbuster
Netking
Netking
21 days ago
Reply to  Gunbuster

haha…..fire starter.

The USNI link below is usually pretty good in tracking the USN fleet and gives a good break down of the assets involved.

https://news.usni.org/2021/04/12/usni-news-fleet-and-marine-tracker-april-12-2021

Gunbuster
Gunbuster
21 days ago
Reply to  Netking

It is a good resource. So is my drive to work to see what’s in on the jetty.
2 x ABS from the USN, BDF OHP Frigate and the former RN FI patrol boat, CHID who is a bit battered and not going anywhere for a while and an assortment of other MCMVs and PCs

Netking
Netking
20 days ago
Reply to  Gunbuster

I’m genuinely envious.

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
21 days ago
Reply to  Gunbuster

Well said mate, and it’s certainly a reality check for those you enjoy putting down our RN, and playing fantasy fleets. Our QE task group is a fantastic achievement for all involved, especially against the backdrop of covid. And we are still in very early day’s of carrier strike. It’s a huge undertaking to get these vessels, crews, aircraft working together as a integrated force. And in 10 years time it will be on another level again in capability. I’m envious of those deploying in May, what a fantastic opportunity for those young matelots. 🇬🇧👍

Frank62
Frank62
20 days ago
Reply to  Gunbuster

It does seem light on escorts for such a force. I would’ve thought the amphibious group would have more protection.
The fact remains that with a UK GSG deployed elsewhere, the UK has little to protect it given all our other commitments & ships in refit etc. Allies are always welcome, but we must be ready do go alone when needed, without undue risk.

Off topic, looks like the Taliban are being given Afghanistan now the US & UK are pulling out.

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
20 days ago
Reply to  Frank62

We can deploy the carrier task group without robbing escorts from other standing taskings. And even with a considerable amount of the force in refits and life extension refits.

Deep32
Deep32
19 days ago
Reply to  Gunbuster

I will nibble at this GB, not sure I entirely agree with you on this! 1 X Tyco and 3xAB v 2×23 and 2×45, the subs pretty much cancel each other out, so just leaves ships. 4 US ships all do strike/asw/aaw. RN ships 2 do asw(limited aaw) 2 do aaw, none do strike! We have more dedicated asw helicopters via our ships, but, they have Asroc! We lose one T23, that’s 50% of our asw capability gone, the US lose one AB, that’s only 25% lost. Bit simplistic I know, the US ships are multi purpose units and armed… Read more »

Gunbuster
Gunbuster
19 days ago
Reply to  Deep32

I did say surface, air and subsurface and specifically did not mention land strike which UK vessels are very lacking in. However multi purpose ABs are jack of all trades and masters of none. They are exceptionally bad at asw and I mean bad. They are comparable to 1980s era RN T22 B2 and B 3 In the AAW sphere they mostly shoot 2 semi active homer AAW missiles at targets and need to illuminate a target. T45 and T23 have active homers. For tactical ballistic missile defence certain ABS do have the edge but not all, only a limited… Read more »

Deep32
Deep32
19 days ago
Reply to  Gunbuster

Take your point ref an old design, with all the limitations that brings, especially when it comes to noise reduction, ABs were always noisy units, we would hear them coming over the horizon, bit like the T45 when it first came out. Can’t comment on their competence at any given discipline, but, they always had a good go during JW. I agree that our setup appears better given we are not really jack’s of all trades, just a little of full specialist units. As good as T45s are in the AAW role, they were sold woefully short on the mainframe… Read more »

Billythefish
Billythefish
21 days ago

The Chinese certainly have been also been ”Makin’ Islands” in the region…haha!

Rob
Rob
20 days ago
Reply to  Billythefish

[applauds]

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
21 days ago

Polar Icebreakers, what on earth for? Surely they’re not looking to pop round to Blighty via the Northern passage for a cuppa!26.03.2021 U.S. admiral warns China could invade Taiwan in next six years ‘Unfavourable’ situation in the US “Davidson also cautioned against the expansion of China’s military assets in the region that according to the top US admiral creates an “unfavourable” situation for the United States and reduces the level of deterrence. He said, “We are accumulating risk that may embolden China to unilaterally change the status quo before our forces may be able to deliver an effective response.” “Already… Read more »

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
20 days ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

And yet they are still a regional power, and a very long way from global deployments with useful aircraft carrier’s and nuclear submarines. Don’t write off the Americans just yet.

Frank62
Frank62
20 days ago
Reply to  Robert Blay.

Yet what could be more clearly the Chinese becoming a global power than its huge expansion of its fleet & deploying its wealth globally as leverage? I think they’re far beyond regional power right now. Freedom & democracy for them are just targets to undermine.

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
20 days ago
Reply to  Frank62

They have a huge navy, but they can’t deploy it far beyond there own region. They lack the key enables, like modern useful carrier’s, and nuclear submarines
and a global support chain. Allied nations will have 29 vessels capable of putting 5th gen F35 capability to sea. China has nothing like that. They certainly could not do what we are about to do with the QE task group.

dan
dan
20 days ago

Sends American forces there to risk American lives but China Joe puts a freeze on all further defensive military sales to Taiwan to appease his Chicom masters. Ugh

Gavin Gordon
Gavin Gordon
20 days ago

China’s window of opportunity on Taiwan is now. The US currently has to assess it’s degree of response to the defence of Europe, in the immediate shape of Ukraine, and also the remarkably similar (to the extent of in-concert?) marked increase in Chinese aggression towards the PRC. This all whilst national economies are impaled by Covid and a new US administration straight way sorely tested. America has a long-standing sympathy for Taiwan, bordering on affection, which probably outweighs the nevertheless genuine concern they share with us for the Ukraine, a new democracy. Under the above scenario, the States are likely… Read more »

Waddi
Waddi
20 days ago
Reply to  Gavin Gordon

https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2021-04-07/china-taiwan-conflict-could-come-sooner-rather-than-later?sref=YNlUDsaj

Article from Bloomberg supporting what you say. Matsu and Quemoy just off the coast of China may well be the first test of Biden’s resolve.

Gavin Gordon
Gavin Gordon
20 days ago
Reply to  Waddi

Thanks, there are similarities. Hardly surprising since the main difference between politicians and the rest of us is they have their hands on the levers that can make the obvious actual. As an aside, it does seem a historical truism that political dictatorships i.e. simplistic option merchants, are so concerned with maintaining their status quo that rigidity sets in, such that they eventually fall behind freer societies. It’s true of Russia and will be true of China at the current rate (whose general population are among the world’s natural ‘free enterprisers’, ironically). Perhaps the ultimate example of that over the… Read more »