Soldiers from 1st Battalion The Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment (1PWRR) are among 4,100 soldiers from 10 different nations currently participating in Exercise Allied Spirit VIII in Southern Germany.

“In addition to the undulating terrain and dense wooded areas making communications and manoeuvrability difficult the Battlegroup were up against an opposing force familiar with the ground and given freedom of movement to conduct numerous probing attacks against their defences. Scenarios that continuously assessed the readiness of the soldiers.”

“It has been very a testing exercise where we have had to adapt to circumstances as presented refining techniques and tactics, we are learning a lot and quickly” commented Major Christiaan Stoffberg Officer Commanding C Company 1PWRR adding:

“Working in a multinational environment as we have here where we are fully integrated and working through interoperability issues as they arise is, I think, essential, this way you learn how to overcome not just the human frictions but the technical aspects as well.

The realism of the exercise has been phenomenal challenging us throughout, the training area has been unforgiving with the terrain often making communications difficult for everyone. It has provided a great learning opportunity for us all – particularly in the importance of maintaining battlefield discipline.”

Private Tom Canwell from Portsmouth said of the exercise:

“Allied Spirit is completely different from any exercise I have been involved in before. Here we have been tested to the full by an enemy who has been very determined, you have to remain alert throughout to potential attacks – it has been a unique and challenging experience.”

9 COMMENTS

  1. Sadly, more such exercises will be necessary for the foreseeable future to ensure we demonstrate our collective determination, against increased Russian posturing.

    • “Russian posturing” ? SMH. NATO (USA’s Trojan horse) has been taking the P ever since the collapse of the Soviet Union, Russia is simply trying to create a buffer zone between it and America’s new colonies.

  2. I think NATO has taken the wrong posture towards Russia.

    It has been NATO’s encroachment around Russia that has it worried: particularly with regard to Kaliningrad.

    This approach though was necessary due to our relatively reduced capabilities and seemingly limited ability to mobilise our forces. If we had more capable and certainly more agile forces in sufficient numbers we wouldn’t need to forward deploy what we do have. Yes, Russia has behaved belligerently towards its smaller neighbours – lacking the restraint one should expect from a statesmanlike, regional power but they have every right to modernise their forces and protect their allies.

    It seems to me that by our passive aggressive stance we have sparked an arms race and therein have created a more toxic and potentially combustible environment. Had we protected investment in our armed forces we could have maintained a more peaceable distance and thereby avoided both this current insecurity and the large sums of money it will take to counter Russia’s response.

    Surely this is testament to the old adage: to achieve peace, one must prepare for war.

    • I firmly believe Putin wants to return Russia to the days of Soviet power. His passion for such a goal is unstoppable, regardless of any perceived provocation by NATO or any other outside influences.

      The part restablishment of the former Soviet military strength may lead to a safer future for Europe, but only if NATO members buy into increasing military spending in order to achieve balance?

    • Russia and their behave in Georgia, Ukraine, and several other places are what have caused NATO to react, rather weakly I think. In regards to Kaliningrad, they have put nukes and long-range AA systems there, which cover most of eastern Europe.

      • I think Putin and many of the old guard hated the denouement of the Soviet military structure and strength. I can understand Russia’s nervousness with some NATO activities, and that simply strengthens Putin’s hand in his endeavours. However, I very much doubt a European war is on his agenda, just some parity and balance.

        • Agree with all your replies. But we don’t need permanent bases in Estonia for example. Rotations and training are enough. Of all the things Putin has or may do attacking a NATO directly is not one of them. He and his cronies want to stay in power and keep getting richer. Attacking NATO would be suicidal.

          • The above conversations identify the possible future European military balance. However, what if Russia expanded its overseas ambitions as seen in Syria. Maybe Putin will find that irresistible as his forces multiply?

    • Sorry Nathan, NATO is reacting to russia, we are in the baltics because of russias behaviour not the other way around.

      As for Kalingrad, what do you expect? Its a hostile nuclear superpower in the middle of europe.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here