British F-35s and Typhoons together with Czech Gripens worked with American destroyer USS Gravely during an air defence exercise as part of Neptune Shield 22 last week.

The exercise involved a range of multi-domain activities “between Air, Land and Maritime assets across Europe and in the Baltic and Mediterranean Seas”.

This particular activity offered the opportunity to conduct Air-Maritime training and “strengthen Alliance capability in a critical area”.

“These types of activities allow NATO forces to coordinate and cooperate together in a complex scenario and improve our ability to react as one, against any threat,” said Brigadier General Christoph Pliet, Deputy Chief of Staff Operations at Allied Air Command.

“Each time we work together with our Allies in the Maritime and Land domains, we become a more cohesive and ready force,” added General Pliet.

USS Gravely - Wikipedia
USS Gravely

In a press release, the Alliance add:

“NESH22 allows NATO forces to integrate the high-end maritime strike capabilities into the constant vigilance activities that provide security and regional stability. The unique capabilities of Allied air power also enables multiple theatre-wide missions and training events to be executed concurrently across Europe. NESH22 has increased the readiness of Allied air, land and maritime components.”

George has a degree in Cyber Security from Glasgow Caledonian University and has a keen interest in naval and cyber security matters and has appeared on national radio and television to discuss current events. He also works for the NHS. George is on Twitter at @geoallison
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Armchair Admiral
Armchair Admiral
2 months ago

Other than what’s apparent over Ukraine, I wonder to what extent the lack of exercises with different nationalities affects the effectiveness of, say, the Chinese armed forces?
AA

Talon
Talon
2 months ago

I would imagine in a very similar way to how it affects the Russians. Exercising with and against peer level threats is a critical part of working out what works and what doesn’t because when an ally finds a weakness in your equipment or strategy, they tell you about it so you can fix it. If you only exercise internally then you don’t have that outside point of view to expose the weak points.

David A
David A
2 months ago
Reply to  Talon

“Exercising with and against peer level threats”. So the Russians need to work with the North Koreans then!

johan
johan
2 months ago
Reply to  David A

based on current performance i think Russia has approached Ireland, as they see that as a real test PMSL

Cymbeline
Cymbeline
2 months ago
Reply to  Talon

Of course they do a bit with those pirates over in Iran.

izzy
izzy
2 months ago
Reply to  Talon

Does Russia or China maintain any equivalent of the US adversary squadrons, allowing exercises against dissimilar combat aircraft? I expect it should be possible to acquire some F-16s or the like…

Steve
Steve
2 months ago

Considering these excerises tend to have massive rules around them, that make any conflict very artificial, i do wonder just how much value they actually give. Looking at the various wars that have happened over the decades and its enemies creating new tactics to overcome weaknesses that have generally won, which would be generally outside the rules of engagements in these types of excerises.

Helpful when we have to work together as an alliance for sure, but Russia is fighting alone.

Last edited 2 months ago by Steve
Martin
Martin
2 months ago

I’m guessing it’s debilitating, you don’t just learn to be a major military force, look at the USA in 1917 and 1941. They had Allie’s in France and Britain able to help them with technology, training and tactics and it still took years. The Chinese have know one to teach them and the only nations they can train with are Donkeys. From what I have heard most Chinese exercises are little more than show and the majority of the upper levels of the PLA are business executives who do the “war thing” for show.

Frank62
Frank62
2 months ago

They can exercise with N Korea, Russia, Pakistan & others.

John Hartley
John Hartley
2 months ago

Which once again shows off the lack of an anti ship missile for RAF Typhoon & F-35B. (Even in simulated attacks). Or at least a heavy precision stand off weapon that can hit moving targets, & thus have a secondary anti ship capability.

Paul.P
Paul.P
2 months ago
Reply to  John Hartley

Asraam? Meteor?

Rudeboy
Rudeboy
2 months ago
Reply to  Paul.P

Neither are any use for that.
The best we’ve got is PWIV from Typhoon and F-35, and Brimstone from Typhoon only.

Paul.P
Paul.P
2 months ago
Reply to  Rudeboy

Yeh; just musing. Meteor has a long range and it’s mach 4 KE is of the same order of magnitude as something like Harpoon. Much smaller warhead of course but it would still pose a significant threat as we know from HMS Sheffield – create enough havoc to get close enough to lob a PW? Brimstone 2 has long legs and is also supersonic. I think I read somewhere the ‘Sea Spear’ version has a 16kg warhead; bigger than the standard 6kg Brimstone. And I would be amazed if an I/R seeker option and/or mid course correction could not been… Read more »

Rudeboy
Rudeboy
2 months ago
Reply to  Paul.P

MoD and MBDA were/ are investigating the use of Meteor as a ARM, but that might be the JNAAM version with AESA. There was talk of an adaptation as a fast response precision strike missile but afaik it went nowhere. Sea Spear is essentially the same as Single Mode Brimstone, only with a software change. The Spear missile (which fills the Spear 3 requirement) does have a warhead around 16kg. The missile itself is around twice the size. Storm Shadow has an IR seeker head for the terminal attack, but it requires pre-loading with the image it expects to see… Read more »

Daveyb
Daveyb
2 months ago
Reply to  Rudeboy

The updated Storm Shadow has a two-way data-link. It can therefore receive new target details as well as relay images to the operator. I don’t think it has been programmed to attack a moving ship, but it can definitely hit a moored up one in a harbour. Its infrared seeker has a pretty decent image resolution, so it can distinguish specific parts of a target prior to the terminal attack. Everything is more or less in place to turn it into a multi-role missile. Just needs a “Go” from the MoD and some time to do the development. The Mitsubishi’s… Read more »

Rudeboy
Rudeboy
2 months ago
Reply to  Daveyb

I’ve never seen anything from MBDA, MoD or anywhere that indicates that the Storm Shadow MLU involved anything other than refurbishment and removal of obsolescent components. Never seen anything about a data link being added.

Sea Spear (aka Maritime Brimstone) does not have a larger warhead. MBDA have never contracted with anyone for a smaller rocket motor. The warhead is still a tandem charge. The only change is MBDA have advertised a delay and proximity capability, which was also proposed on the Future Attack Helicopter Guided Weapon Brimstone variant that lost out to JAGM.

Daveyb
Daveyb
2 months ago
Reply to  Rudeboy

You need to look further.

Sceptical Richard
Sceptical Richard
2 months ago
Reply to  Daveyb

LRASM is nothing more than a significantly modified JASSM, after all, more or less along the lines you suggest with Storm Shadow.

Matt
Matt
2 months ago
Reply to  Paul.P

The Sheffield Exocet had a 165kg warhead.

Marked
Marked
2 months ago
Reply to  John Hartley

Those mythical subs that can be everywhere at once will carry out anti shipping strikes. No need to worry.

Frank62
Frank62
2 months ago
Reply to  Marked

Some were also saying our warships could do without AShMs because our jets (& 5 or 6 operational SSNs) would also deal with surface threats. With what?!!

Seems like we’re firmly head in the sand, imagining excuses & spin from the treasury will somehow compensate for not having basic war fighting gear. They even back tracked on a rare episode of sanity when they proposed & then cancelled an interim AShM. Theres plenty of options out ther. It’s simply inexcusable.

Last edited 2 months ago by Frank62
Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
2 months ago
Reply to  John Hartley

They’re available John, we just need to purchase some!

“MARTE ER missile is going to be integrated on Eurofighter TYPHOON and other fast jets. MARTE ER’s design takes into account that MARTE MK2/S is already qualified and installed on these two platforms. This offers the following advantages: Same mechanical, functional & electrical helicopter interfaces.”

Marte ER

Range: Well beyond 100 km

https://www.mbda-systems.com/product/marte-er/#:~:text=MARTE%20ER%20missile%20is%20going,mechanical%2C%20functional%20%26%20electrical%20helicopter%20interfaces

typhoon-marte-er-eurofighter_64665.jpg
Last edited 2 months ago by Nigel Collins
Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
2 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

This weapon isn’t integrated on Typhoon yet. It’s one thing hanging it under the wings for publicity photos. Another altogether to turn it into a workable weapon system.

John Hartley
John Hartley
2 months ago
Reply to  Robert Blay.

I keep reading contradictory reports on Marte ER & Typhoon. First it was part of the Qatar contract. Now that has gone quiet & other platforms mentioned instead.

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
2 months ago
Reply to  John Hartley

Matre ER is a sticking plaster weapon. Probably very good reason why the RAF don’t have a requirement to purchase it, or any other air launched anti ship missile at the moment.

AlexS
AlexS
2 months ago
Reply to  John Hartley

It should be the Koweit order that have Marte ER for Typhoon..

The Typhoons for Koweit is an Italian contract, while Qatar one is a British contract.

AlexS
AlexS
2 months ago
Reply to  AlexS

More news:
Qatar indeed will have Marte ER but it will be in NH90 helicopters it bought from Leonardo.

Daveyb
Daveyb
2 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

I believe Kongsberg, are also paying to have their JSM integrated on Typhoon at the company’s expense. In my opinion a more flexible weapon system than Marte.

Rudeboy
Rudeboy
2 months ago
Reply to  Daveyb

Kongsberg have proposed it but no-one has ever funded it.

Marte-ER is being integrated by Italy, work underway at present. It’s being paid for by Kuwait.

Quentin D63
Quentin D63
2 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Hi Nigel, I love your persistence with this photo…even if it maybe a fantasy for the RAF!

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
2 months ago
Reply to  Quentin D63

You never know who’s looking!

andy a
andy a
2 months ago
Reply to  John Hartley

Can we not use Storm shadow? uses a thermal imager to match target to memory so surely it would make a mess of a large surface ship?

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
2 months ago
Reply to  andy a

A bit more on the subject can be found here.

Future Cruise And Anti-Ship Weapon FC/ASW Program Reaches New Milestone
https://www.navalnews.com/naval-news/2022/02/future-cruise-and-anti-ship-weapon-fc-asw-program-reaches-new-milestone/

Cravendale
Cravendale
2 months ago
Reply to  John Hartley

Totally agree John, the lack of a fixed wing maratime strike weapon is a massive capability gap that most other top tier militaries except us seem to have, arming our F 35’s with something like the JSM or LRASM would provide a significant boost in firepower to a carrier strike group.

We saw just how deadly these types of weapons can be in the Falklands when used against us.

Last edited 2 months ago by Cravendale
Grant
Grant
2 months ago
Reply to  John Hartley

We should be buying NSM / JSM as a canister AShM for the T31s/23s/45s and to be carried by our F35s.

Quentin D63
Quentin D63
2 months ago
Reply to  Grant

You’ll probably see the RAAF/RAN doing this, maybe even LSRAM too. The RAF/RN seem to be hanging out for the FC/ASW so let’s hope it’s just around the corner.

Marked
Marked
2 months ago

Wonder how the results went. Having to get dangerously close to deliver any weapons on target. Not that we need air delivered anti ship capability when we have a navy. Ahhhh, wait a minute…. the navy can’t do it either….dohhh

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
2 months ago

“Does anyone have any information regarding our f35s on this subject as I’ve not seen any images of our planes since their return from the world tour? “Intergranular corrosion occurs as a chemical reaction between metal and the environment. It can degrade the material properties causing stress cracking and cause tensile stress which can impact adjacent components”, the report said. The report points to Aluminium Alloy 7085, used in the construction of the F-35 — the first time the material had been used in widespread production of a military aircraft. “AA 7085 is reported to have increased susceptibility to intergranular… Read more »

Shocking-photos-US-F-35C-Lightning-II-jets-covered-in-rust.jpg
Last edited 2 months ago by Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
2 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

All Photo credits: Twitter

Shocking-photos-US-F-35C-Lightning-II-jets-covered-in-rust-1.jpg
Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
2 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

All Photo credits: Twitter

Shocking-photos-US-F-35C-Lightning-II-jets-covered-in-rust-2.jpg
Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
2 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Good reason not to speed up delivery methinks as some want

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
2 months ago
Reply to  Spyinthesky

Indeed, still plenty to fix it appears!

Worth reading in full, including the links.

“The world recently saw evidence of how fragile the F-35’s stealth coating is and the challenges of maintaining it properly. Photos released by the Pentagon’s own in-house multimedia outlet, Defense Visual Information Distribution Service, show some of the F-35Cs aboard the USS Carl Vinson covered in what appears to be rust while on deployment in the Pacific.”

F-35 Program Stagnated in 2021 but DOD Testing Office Hiding Full Extent of Problem

BY DAN GRAZIER | FILED UNDER ANALYSIS | MARCH 09, 2022

https://www.pogo.org/analysis/2022/03/f-35-program-stagnated-in-2021-but-dod-testing-office-hiding-full-extent-of-problem/

33fcb642725a4eaa99d6d980bd401c94.jpg
Grant
Grant
2 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

That looks like a F22 not an F35 (see the intakes). One of the benefits of F35 over F22 is the stealth coating takes less effort to maintain

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
2 months ago
Reply to  Grant

Are you suggesting the F22 has the same issues?

“The report points to Aluminium Alloy 7085, used in the construction of the F-35 — the first time the material had been used in widespread production of a military aircraft.”

Shocking-photos-US-F-35C-Lightning-II-jets-covered-in-rust-1.jpg
Grant
Grant
2 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Google rusting F22s! Its well known. The skin coating is what drives up the maintenance costs; so for the ones they used for airshows and the like they actually skimped on it a bit (because you don’t need to be stealth at an airshow). I think a lot of people (including the US Navy) have wondered how these expensively coated air craft would fare on the front of a carrier. It doesn’t make them less airworthy just less stealth, but as in general they have radar reflectors on them so that our adversaries can’t get a real understanding of just… Read more »

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
2 months ago
Reply to  Grant

Cheers Grant, the radar reflectors are clearly very useful.

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
2 months ago
Reply to  Grant

The bottom picture is an F22. 👍

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
2 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

That’s a F22 in the last picture.

Daveyb
Daveyb
2 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

The rusty looking surface of the F35 and F22 is not due to aluminium corrosion. Aluminium oxidation due to salt water corrosion is white and powdery. To protect the aircraft that operates in a maritime environment. The primer and paint will have some protection properties, but the manufacturer would also add a corrosion inhibitor such as ACF-50, to areas such as wheel wells, bomb bays etc. On top of that the aircraft will have a fresh water wash and detergent wash planned into its maintenance cycle, which is followed up with corrective maintenance on areas showing signs of corrosion. The… Read more »

expat
expat
2 months ago
Reply to  Daveyb

Yes I believe ferrite(aka iron) is one of the possible components in RAM

Daveyb
Daveyb
2 months ago
Reply to  expat

It has been historically used in RAM.

ianbuk
ianbuk
2 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

This particular photo is of an F22. The intakes, sensor gains and nose differentiate it from the F35

Rudeboy
Rudeboy
2 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

There was no sign of any corrosion onboard the F-35B used by the USMC or RAF onboard the QE Class when they returned from a very long deployment.

Grant
Grant
2 months ago
Reply to  Rudeboy

One of the benefits of having a big ship is we can keep them inside away from the elements (I believe the QEs can take 24 inside)
The US Carriers have to keep a lot more aircraft on deck.

grizzler
grizzler
2 months ago
Reply to  Rudeboy

what about the one they dragged up form the bottom of the ocean…any corosion on that 🙂

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
2 months ago
Reply to  Rudeboy

I haven’t seen any images of them as they were flown off before the QE docked as I recall?

Rudeboy
Rudeboy
2 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

There were a lot of pics of them returning to Marham. I didn’t see any (but I didn’t look) of the USMC ones that flew off to Rota.

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
2 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

They always fly off before docking back k in Portsmouth.

Sean
Sean
2 months ago
Reply to  Rudeboy

There was a previous report about the USN noticing it’s F35s showed deterioration onboard its ships whereas those on the QE showed none. The simple answer is we keep them in the hanger most of the time, not exposed to elements in the flight deck.

John N
John N
2 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

I think you are scraping the bottom of the barrel dredging up an ABC Australia report from more than three years ago. Our ABC (equivalent of UK BBC), doesn’t exactly have a reputation for particularly high quality defence reporting here in Australia, in fact it’s mostly the opposite. As to the ABC report, which supposedly quotes the KPMG report, uses words such as ‘potential’ problems, or ‘risk’ of metal stress. There of course is risk and the potential to get run over when one is crossing the road, doesn’t mean it actually happens. I vaguely remember reading that ABC article… Read more »

Grinch
Grinch
2 months ago
Reply to  John N

That’s Nigel for you – lives under a bridge

John N
John N
2 months ago
Reply to  Grinch

Exactly, what’s that word again for under bridge dwellers? Starts with a T doesn’t it?

Anyway, any opportunity to try and lay the boot into the F-35.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
2 months ago
Reply to  John N
John N
John N
2 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Mate,

Can I make a suggestion?

It’s not healthy to obsess over one thing, your one man crusade against the F-35 is over the top.

Close the laptop for a while, get a hobby, go outside in the sun and suck in some fresh air.

You’ll feel better if you do.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
2 months ago
Reply to  John N

Mate, do you work for the procurement DPT at the MOD? Is that what you did with Ajax? Personally, I would rather point out the problems so we don’t piss more money away on something that’s clearly not fit for purpose at great expense to the taxpayer. It was supposed to be both stealthy and cheap after all! And then look at a potential shortfall of 600 airframes, how much will it cost then? “Let’s fast forward to the 2035/2036-ish timeframe. Is there still a need for that low-cost platform? I think, right now, there is,” he said. “And what… Read more »

Last edited 2 months ago by Nigel Collins
Robert Blay
Robert Blay
2 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Just like the USAF wanted 750 F22’s. They got 197. It’s still the world’s best air dominance fighter. You have very short sight views with the F35 Nigel. Views that are not shared with the Air Force’s and Navy’s around the world that have the true data and cost & capabilitys.

Klonkie
Klonkie
2 months ago
Reply to  Robert Blay

Hi Robert.

Interesting the Yanks didn’t opt to re open the F22 line but instead went with a further order of F15s. I imagine Lockheed stored the jacks for the F22?
Would a second batch of F22 will be more affordable or would this be offset by the restart costs?

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
2 months ago
Reply to  Klonkie

No unfortunately. The costs would be huge to restart F22 production. And it’s now 20+ years old. But the F15EX only exists because they didn’t buy enough F22’s, and F15Cs have had to soldier on much longer than intended

Klonkie
Klonkie
2 months ago
Reply to  Robert Blay

thanks Robert for the reply

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
2 months ago
Reply to  Klonkie

You are welcome mate 👍

Paul T
Paul T
2 months ago
Reply to  Klonkie

Another reason why F22 production could never be restarted is because the US Govt made a point of destroying all the Jigs and production aids.

Klonkie
Klonkie
2 months ago
Reply to  Paul T

ah, that make sense- thanks Paul

Sean
Sean
2 months ago
Reply to  Robert Blay

Agreed, Nigel thinks he knows better than the top brass of most Western nations… 😂

Sean
Sean
2 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

How about quoting a credible source rather than a partisan site pushing an agenda? 🤦🏻‍♂️

ianbuk
ianbuk
2 months ago
Reply to  John N

‘Tory?’

John N
John N
2 months ago
Reply to  ianbuk

Tory? Sorry what?

Have no idea what you mean?

ianbuk
ianbuk
2 months ago
Reply to  John N

I was a joke to another comment. Somehow it ended up after your comment. I have deleted it.

John N
John N
2 months ago
Reply to  ianbuk

Mate, no prob.

I was just a bit confused is all.

I’m always up for a joke, as long as I know what the joke is!

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
2 months ago
Reply to  Grinch

Lives in the real world, like it or not. Try educating yourself, its not hard really.

https://www.pogo.org/analysis/2022/03/f-35-program-stagnated-in-2021-but-dod-testing-office-hiding-full-extent-of-problem

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
2 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

The facts are Nigel. 14 countries operate F35, with another 7 In the procurement process. And it’s the most capable fighter ever operated by the RAF. As for numbers. Not one single nation has bought the numbers originally set out. F22, 750, got 197. Typhoon, 250, then 232, got 157. same with Rafale numbers, Gripen ect ect. It’s not a reflection of the capability of these aircraft, it’s just politics and budgets. F35 has game changing capabilites well beyond simple top speeds and g limits. It’s a shame you don’t understand its capability, and what it brings to the fight.… Read more »

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
2 months ago
Reply to  John N

Try today in that case, or will your next excuse be the source?

F35 was found to be covered in rust, can stealth fighters still be invisible if they are rusted?
2022-05-31

https://inf.news/en/military/1b8926a71c83de79ef1916156f646702.html

Last edited 2 months ago by Nigel Collins
Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
2 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Making friends again are we Nigel. 😆

John N
John N
2 months ago
Reply to  Robert Blay.

Ha ha! Very good.

Maybe not friends in our reality?

Cur the ‘Twilight Zone’ theme perhaps?

Daveyb
Daveyb
2 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Oh God, who wrote that article? Without going into too much detail, it looks worse than it actually is. The embedded RAM will still work as advertised regardless on how bad it looks.

ianbuk
ianbuk
2 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Inf news, Indonesia based, owned by the same company that owns the South China Morning Post and Goldthread = Alibaba Group.

Take their news and views with a big pinch of MSG!

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
2 months ago
Reply to  ianbuk

I will! “While it is known that significant leaps in the maintainability of radar-absorbent materials (RAM) were integrated into the F-35 design, recent images from the F-35C’s inaugural cruise raise potential questions about the ease of maintaining the jet’s coatings in the demanding maritime environment. Photos that appeared recently on the Pentagon’s Defense Visual Information Distribution Service, or DVIDS, website reveal the extent of the weathering that’s affected the F-35Cs of Strike Fighter Squadron 147 After all, rust only affects ferrous metals like iron or steel and the F-35’s largely composite airframe wouldn’t rust, although its RAM — which has… Read more »

expat
expat
2 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Nigel most likely ferrite in the RAM used to coat the F35. Aluminium is more likely the internal components. You mentioned intergranular, have read the report but this is likely microscopic corrosion within the material at the grain boundaries, this could lead crack propagating in the structure but this would not be visible externally or even to the naked eye or if it was it would not be ‘rust’ coloured

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
2 months ago
Reply to  expat

Cheers expat, as DaveyB points out, it appears to be the stealth coating that is showing signs of rust, not good for a stealth aircraft and expensive to fix no doubt.

Rfn_Weston
Rfn_Weston
2 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Hi Guys, I happen to know a fair bit about this side of things. 7085 has extremely good resistance to corrosion. It can be treated with an enhanced annealing/ageing process that refines the grain boundaries and increase the presence of low angle grain boundaries which are great for increasing resistance to intergranular corrosion and as a result – stress cracking. I’m sure Lockheed Martin are aware of this. Aluminium oxide is white anyway… What you’re looking at is red rust which is basically iron oxidisation. I’d suggest it is a fault in the coating or environmental surface contamination that is… Read more »

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
2 months ago
Reply to  Rfn_Weston

Hi Rfn_Weston, many thanks for taking the time to explain the problem in some detail.

Would it then be the case that the coating which appears to be red has reduced the effectiveness of stealth on the F35s that suffer from this problem? and of course, bulkheads cracking?

Many thanks in advance for your reply to my questions!

Steve M
Steve M
2 months ago

So what did our F-35’s and Typhoons fly about looking pretty being decoy targets so the Gripens could shoot missiles

Paul.P
Paul.P
2 months ago
Reply to  Steve M

Maybe just exercising the destroyer’s defences? How many attacking aircraft and missiles does it take to swamp an Aegis system?

andy a
andy a
2 months ago
Reply to  Steve M

Yeah we could afford either a top shelf plane or weapons but not both

Steve S
Steve S
2 months ago

Could QUICKSINK (the modified GBU-31) be a be good, quick, cheap option for the F35? I presume these could be stored in the internal weapon bay?

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker
2 months ago
Reply to  Steve S

Is it much better than paveway IV?

Daveyb
Daveyb
2 months ago
Reply to  Steve S

No not really, you still need to get relatively close to a ship to use the weapon, plus you need to continuously lase the ship, for the seeker to home in on. If you fly at a high-ish straight and level path, you will easy meat for the ship’s air defences. You could fly in at very low level, do an over the shoulder lob whilst bunting, then slam down to the deck again hoping you’ve broken lock. But again that’s very risky, plus the weapon is no longer being laser guided. Unless you have another aircraft standing off outside… Read more »

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
2 months ago
Reply to  Daveyb

Sorry, meant for Steve S Hi Steve S, depending on the size of the GBU-31 for internal carrige. “The limited weapons loadout of the Block 3i F-35 makes an effective attack of many expected types of targets in a typical theatre a challenge. For example, unlike legacy aircraft, the Block 3i F-35 has no mixed weapons load capability, which limits flexibility to attack targets with appropriately matched weapons. Block 3i F-35 aircraft can only employ two internally carried bombs, and although internal carriage reduces the susceptibility of the F-35 relative to legacy aircraft, by virtue of the low observability it… Read more »

Netking
Netking
2 months ago
Reply to  Daveyb

I read a quote from a usaf official recently who explained the thinking behind this weapon. It’s not envisioned for use in attacking high end surface vessels but lightly armed vessels, think the Chinese maritime militia which possesses close to a hundred thousand vessels and are often times armed and used to intimidate opposing vessels. No need to “waste very expensive anti ship weapons on these when you can use the relatively cheap quicksink to accomplish the same thing.

Netking
Netking
2 months ago
Reply to  Steve S

I read a quote from a usaf official recently who explained the thinking behind this weapon. It’s not envisioned for use in attacking high end surface vessels but lightly armed vessels, think the Chinese maritime militia which possesses close to a hundred thousand vessels and are often times armed and used to intimidate opposing vessels. No need to “waste very expensive anti ship weapons on these when you can use the relatively cheap quicksink to accomplish the same thing.

geoff
geoff
2 months ago

So the Brits get to hone their anti-ship systems and the Yanks get to improve their anti-aircraft defences. If they share information it sort of cancels out their mutual advantage? Hmm…
I suppose each would hope that adversaries do not conduct these vital learning excercises😉

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
2 months ago

Agree with other posters. A decent air launched ASM should be a priority for F35 and Typhoon.

Joe16
Joe16
2 months ago

Yes, I came late to the party too.
Quite interested by the Italian connection with the Marte-ER that someone mentioned. No idea about the relative benefits vs JSM etc. but I like the idea with partnering with them to strengthen overall relationships. What with CAMM-ER, the upgrades to Aster 30, helicopters and of course Tempest, it’s a productive relationship that’s worth developing. To me, their cannister-launched AShM kind of falls into this bracket- as a low-end compliment to FC/ASW for T31 and other GP frigates.

Daveyb
Daveyb
2 months ago
Reply to  Joe16

Marte-ER has a similar range to Harpoon, but carries a much smaller warhead 75kg to Harpoon’s 220kg.

AlexS
AlexS
2 months ago
Reply to  Daveyb

Yes, it has the advantage of small weight overall. It would be a good system for RN Merlins. Italians have them(or the old version) in their Merlin/NH90

Joe16
Joe16
2 months ago
Reply to  Daveyb

Does that make it broadly analogous to the old Sea Eagle then? 75 kg warhead may be less than JSM (I think they’re about 100 kg?), but it also looks to be physically smaller, which means that Italy may be interested in partnering with us on F-35B internal carriage integration. The biggest issue I have with our carrier package at the moment is that we rely almost completely on the Astute for surface warfare against larger targets at range, at the same time we’re “leaning” to the Pacific and China as the main threat. The USN have Hornet to deliver… Read more »

geoff
geoff
2 months ago

Hi Daniele. Agree-would fill a big gap all round!

Last edited 2 months ago by geoff
Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
2 months ago
Reply to  geoff

Hi geoff!😀

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
2 months ago

At face value, you are right mate. But you have to ask, why aren’t the RAF and RN making it a priority? Why dont they have an official requirement for the capability?. What do they know that we don’t? why aren’t they making a big noise about it. There is much more to it then strapping on a missile under the wing. The Sea Eagle went out of service years ago.

Jon
Jon
2 months ago
Reply to  Robert Blay

FC/ASM is the official requirement, or Spear Cap 5. Expected early 2030s on a Typhoon near you. Prior to that, Spear Cap 3 should also have an anti-ship capability Expected on Typhoon from about 2023 and F-35 from 2027/2028. MBDA say, “it can engage a wide range of target types both on land and at sea.” So I’m guessing that’s an anti-ship function unless they are talking about blowing up oil platforms. It’s pretty small and I’d have thought it would have to be fired in significant numbers to disable a warship. As for the Royal Navy, someone took their budget… Read more »

Last edited 2 months ago by Jon
Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
2 months ago
Reply to  Robert Blay

Hi mate. You of all people are always more sensible and reasoned than me, and I’m told I’m all that often enough! I myself think it is simply budget. I get the reluctance and reasoning concerning sticking ASM on all our escorts, and I get that the main anti ship platforms are aircraft and the SSNs. I’d wonder what do they know that we don’t concerning removing the Hercs, that seems bonkers too, and that comes down to budget, regardless of the fact the commitments of the Atlas Hercules Globemaster fleet have not diminished. Regards the SSNs we know there… Read more »

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
2 months ago

Hi mate, I’ll take that as a compliment 😆 Sea Eagle and Alarm was about budget, but also the threats didn’t meterliaze, especially with Sea Eagle, and the Russian threats. As we concentrated on insurgency campaigns. Hercules does seem bonkers, but some clever planners will have crunched the numbers, and decided we can cover it. Atlas availability and capability still has a lot to unlock. Even C17 and Voyager capacity can be improved with the same number of aircraft. Increasing flight hours, tweaking maintenance routines can create lot of extra capacity. And hopefully a few more A400’s will be funded.… Read more »

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
2 months ago
Reply to  Robert Blay

The Dogs ********! 😆🐕

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
2 months ago

Thats the one 😆👍

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker
2 months ago
Reply to  Robert Blay

The antiship land attack missile is coming and it’s a case of waiting. Spear 3 is coming soon. Blame Lockheed for the F35 problems. RAF had planned things to moving faster. What could be cut to get an interim anti ship capability. I just can’t see where the funds would come from. Put that cash into getting new missile into service on time. I would much rather monies was spent on situational awareness and targeting at longer ranges. It’s ok having a 1000 mile anti ship missile but who are you launching it at and how do you know where… Read more »

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
2 months ago
Reply to  Monkey spanker

Exactly mate. Missiles are useless without an effective kill chain. And how do you find, track and engage an enemy warship from many hundreds of miles away moving at 25knots, running electronically silent. It’s next to impossible. Add in low observable designs, ECM, EW, knowing satellite orbit track’s, using the weather as cover. All the reasons why these weapons have never been used for decades.

Quentin D63
Quentin D63
2 months ago
Reply to  Robert Blay

Maybe the FC/ASW is just around the corner or there’s some other secret developments going on. I sure hope it’s not a massive amount of delusion, ust laziness or some inter-service rivalry going on as fighting effectively with “Fitted for fresh air” won’t cut it!
I’m a Pom down here in 🇦🇺 and proud of the government making a commitment to up arming the RAN, RAAF with some decent AShM ability and maybe even the Army with coastal NSM.

Watcherzero
Watcherzero
2 months ago

Results from a multinational but primarily French naval wargame at the end of last year. Lot to digest:

https://www.navalnews.com/naval-news/2022/05/feedback-on-french-navy-high-intensity-exercise-polaris/