The British Army say that the second UK taskforce to deploy to the United Nations Peacekeeping Operation in Mali is undertaking its final mission rehearsal exercise before deploying.

The United Nations Peacekeeping Operation is known as MINUSMA (Multidimensional Integrated Stabilisation Mission). Its aim is to protect civilians and build a sustainable peace.

The British Army say that the troops are not there to take the fight to the extremist enemy but, if required, “the taskforce is well-experienced and equipped to react to threats and defend themselves”.

“The Desert Rats follow in the footsteps of The Light Dragoons-led taskforce who received a welcome reaction from the local population, with some of the locals asking them “to stay forever.”

Lieutenant Colonel Will Meddings, the Commanding Officer of the 2nd Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment who will lead the second deploying taskforce said:

“The first taskforce is already showing the positive impact the British Army can have. The Royal Anglian taskgroup will deliver even more – patrolling further, and for longer, than most other nations in Mali.

This month we’ve proved we can operate for weeks in the field, and I’m proud to be bringing such a capable taskgroup to join the United Nations, building stability and helping protect civilians from violence.”

You can read more here.

 

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Dern
Dern
1 month ago

There’s some interesting phrasing going on here. While not strictly wrong, why is one formation being referred to by it’s brigade name, while the other by one of it’s contributing regiments, especially since the Royal Anglians deployed in Mali already are part of the Desert Rats?

Airborne
Airborne
1 month ago
Reply to  Dern

Is it slowly becoming more than a “taskforce”, to a bit more of a Battlegroup, closely followed up by a Brigade???? While im not against any sort of formation deployment against the ISS cockroaches and its various splinter groups of worms and sad maggots, but not under the control of the frigging UN. Operations can mean pro-active, intelligence led offensive kinetic action, and thats what the UN is so terrified of commiting to, and thats why it will always be a waste of time, money, effort and lives.

Airborne
Airborne
1 month ago
Reply to  Airborne

Sorry should read ISIS, I have nothing against the International Space Station….

Dern
Dern
1 month ago
Reply to  Airborne

See that’s where I disagree. The Op should be under the UN, big picture it, after Trump, the UN needs to be given a chance to show that it’s still relevant, and having an active part in running a stabilisation task is a great way to do that. The UK and British Army also gain some good points for deploying on a UN tasking. After all that talk of “illegal wars” we need the PR win of deploying at force in what in theory is the ultimate global community.

OldSchool
OldSchool
1 month ago
Reply to  Dern

I don’t think the UK is the issue – more the UN re credibility. Admittedly its an insertion into another interminable civil war situation. Tuaregs vs black Mali’s. So it will go on for years and years and then the UK will leave ….mission unaccomplished but money and possibly lives wasted etc.

Airborne
Airborne
1 month ago
Reply to  Dern

The concept is a good one, under a UN banner but it doesnt work, and im sure you, like me, have experienced the weakness that the UN displays. If the UN became a little more authorative, and less apeasing then I would be with you mate. Have a good one.

DaveyB
DaveyB
1 month ago
Reply to  Airborne

Being involved in UNPROFOR in ’92, I saw first hand how slow and amareturish the UN can be. Being incapable of a making a local tactical decision without first getting authority. Many lives were lost because local UN commanders did not have the authority to intervene. As soon as NATO took over and were assertive from the off, things started to change in Bosnia.

Hopefully the guys operating under the UN flag have decent rules of engagement that protects them?

Karl
Karl
1 month ago
Reply to  Airborne

Agree totally. I know an ex-Ranger who came under Pakistani/UN command in Mogadishu. He clearly states to this day that the UN is not fit for military ops of any kind.
The Sarajevo shelling also springs to mind, a French artillery unit ripped off blue berets and returned counter-battery fire, therefore, saving lives. One artillery officer quoted as saying ” I will not wear the colour of cowardice”.

Reaper
Reaper
1 month ago
Reply to  Karl

Interesting a Frenchman said that. Keenly remember their performance in Afghanistan…

Karl
Karl
1 month ago
Reply to  Reaper

Some are ok, we have our share of idiots.

dan
dan
1 month ago

Hate to see our British comrades wearing blue on their helmets. Good luck!

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
1 month ago
Reply to  dan

I had no issue wearing a blue beret in Cyprus on a UN peacekeeping mission.

Jonny
Jonny
1 month ago

Well at least they’re easy to spot…

Karl
Karl
1 month ago
Reply to  Jonny

Most rub sand and dirt into the blue to reduce its colour and fade it. Its something western troops should not be made to wear.