Here’s how many trained regular soldiers there are in each of the British Army’s regiments and corps.

The following information breaks down the strength of the British Army by Regiment. The information came to light from the response to a written parliamentary question:

John Healey, MP for Wentworth and Dearne, asked:

“To ask the Secretary of State for Defence,  in each year since 2010.”

James Heappey, Parliamentary Undersecretary (Ministry of Defence), responded:

“The number of trained Regular Soldiers as at 1 April, each year from 2017 to 2021, broken down by Arm/Service, is shown in the table below. Information for years 2010 – 2016 has already been provided as part of a previous parliamentary question and can be found at the following link: https://questions-statements.parliament.uk/written-questions/detail/2016-09-15/46584

Arm/Service1 Apr 20171 Apr 20181 Apr 20191 Apr 20201 Apr 2021
Total75,61974,07071,86970,44573,446
Staff704715723726752
Household Cavalry/Royal Armoured Corps4,4864,3994,3134,2414,431
Royal Regiment of Artillery5,9225,7275,4665,2285,506
Corps of Royal Engineers7,2457,0926,8926,6897,500
Royal Corps of Signals5,6585,7395,6235,4335,676
Infantry19,01818,05317,12117,05718,023
Army Air Corps1,6281,5911,5021,5101,542
Royal Army Chaplain’s Department131126118117120
The Royal Logistic Corps10,44810,40610,1409,9829,941
Royal Army Medical Corps2,9503,0243,0083,0603,095
Corps of Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers7,4647,3097,2757,0127,358
Adjutant Generals Corps Staff & Personnel Support3,2233,2183,1072,9583,033
Adjutant Generals Corps Royal Military Police1,5091,4631,4371,3551,320
Adjutant Generals Corps Military Provost Service175178165149141
Adjutant General’s Corps Educational and Training274275285280302
Adjutant General’s Corps Army Legal Services Branch9999888991
Royal Army Veterinary Corps354353341337350
Small Arms School Corps147146143142142
Royal Army Dental Corps227212201188182
Intelligence Corps1,6931,6761,6481,6181,689
Royal Army Physical Training Corps443435429433435
Queen Alexandra’s Royal Army Nursing Corps871880913927949
Royal Corps of Army Music697690674675646
Senior Soldier Continuity Posts247242249219213

Notes/Caveats:

1. Figures are for the Trade Trained Regular Army only and therefore exclude Gurkhas, Full Time Reserve Service, Mobilised Reserves, Army Reserve and all other Reserves, but includes those personnel that have transferred from GURTAM to UKTAP.

2. Figures represent personnel’s Arm/Service, regardless of the Unit they are serving in.

3. At any one situation date in the above table, there are less than circa 20 people who according to the Joint Personnel Administration System (JPA), do not have a known Arm/Service attributed to them. Whilst they are included in the total, they have not been included in the breakdown.

4. All Officers of Paid Rank Colonel and above are included in Staff, regardless of previous Arm/Service.

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Ian M
Ian M
4 months ago

I do hate to be picky about an interesting article but there are no regiments listed in the table, they are Corps mostly. Keep the articles coming Tom.
cheers

Dern
Dern
4 months ago
Reply to  Ian M

Household Cavalry and the Royal Regiment of Artillery?

Watcherzero
Watcherzero
4 months ago
Reply to  Dern

Household Cavalry is two regiments, Artillery Regiment is 13 regular regiments, five reserve regiments and a ceremonial unit.

Dern
Dern
4 months ago
Reply to  Watcherzero

The Royal Artillery Regiment is still a single regiment. Love it or not there are regiments listed in this.

Ian M
Ian M
4 months ago
Reply to  Dern

I stand corrected

Sleepy
Sleepy
4 months ago

Nice to see with a shrinking Army the General Staff are looking after themselves!

Deep32
Deep32
4 months ago
Reply to  Sleepy

Yes, my thoughts too!!

Gareth
Gareth
4 months ago
Reply to  Sleepy

Yes indeed. It would be interesting to see a similar breakdown by budget and maybe even £/soldier to see where the easiest cost savings can be made. To put coarsely, how many infantrymen cost the same as a general/admiral etc? And how many of these very senior ranks are currently filled – I remember some years ago reading that we had more than one admiral for every ship in the navy. Don’t know how true that was but made the point anyway.

duffer
duffer
4 months ago
Reply to  Gareth

it takes 20+ years to gain the experience of a general or WO1/WO2, with complete respect for the job they do, it takes months to generate an infantry private and that could be done rapidly if needed. In a small army it is far more important to retain a core of experience and specialists, than to have a mass of infantry.

Airborne
Airborne
4 months ago
Reply to  duffer

Not to sure duff as it takes 6 months to complete basic infantry training, to go to Bn as a crow, knowing very little, no specialised training or experience. While I agree with your comment in regard to SNCOs, to be a modern, relevant Infantry soldier is no longer as easy or as quick as it could have/used to be. Small numbers mean muti skilled lads starting at Tom level. The days of quick regeneration of people and kit are long gone mate.

Deep32
Deep32
4 months ago
Reply to  Gareth

Believe the RN currently has some 80-90 officers of staff rank is colonel or above, of which some ,35 are Rear admiral or above.

JimAB
JimAB
4 months ago
Reply to  Gareth

Unfortunately we have more brigadiers and generals than main battle tanks!

Last edited 4 months ago by JimAB
Graham Moore
Graham Moore
4 months ago
Reply to  Sleepy

About 1%. Not too outrageous to me.

Pacman27
Pacman27
4 months ago

so the really interesting thing about this is that the number is essentially the new size of the army including its “increase” for the Rangers bringing it up to 73,500.

perhaps I am too cynical, but it looks as if the MOD has literally just taken the armies current size and made up a construct that that is what we need.

really good data in here

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
4 months ago

“Senior Soldier Continuity Posts”

I’d not come across that before.

Rob
Rob
4 months ago

Nor me. I think they mean either:

A. Officers who never quite made it to Brigadier (ie General rank) and have been made Colonel of this and that training camp or embassy.

Or

B. Senior NCOs who have been promoted to officer rank to serve out their days as ‘mentors’ to junior officers.

Whatever it is a nonsense.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
4 months ago
Reply to  Rob

Nothing to do with officers. This is about soldiers. New name for the LSL soldier.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
4 months ago

Daniele, SSCP is is the new name for LSL (Long Service List). Army maximum engagement for soldiers has always been 22 years (ie up to age 40). But senior soldiers who wanted to do another 3 years applied for LSL (rank Sgt and upwards). The classic jobs they used to get was ‘Recruiting Sgts’ in ACIOs – all ancient history now as I believe these places, where they exist, are staffed by civvies. I believe the SSCP scheme pushes the envelope beyond the old LSL scheme with senior soldiers being able to extend to a 30 year service point or… Read more »

Ian M
Ian M
4 months ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Graham,
I was on the old LSL for a few years as an Instructor at Arborfield.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
3 months ago
Reply to  Ian M

I may have met you Ian. I served 1975-2009 in the Corps.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
4 months ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Got it. Thanks Graham.

David Barry
David Barry
4 months ago

Number of soldiers decreased by Staff – Col and above increased from circa 700 to 752, when the size of the Army decreased! That’s so wrong and stand by for a broadside from the RN!

David Steeper
4 months ago
Reply to  David Barry

The RN should keep out of it. The Army brass may be shit at everything else but they’re good at MoD politics.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
4 months ago
Reply to  David Steeper

David,
If the Army top brass was as good as you say at MoD politics, they would have oposed £5bn of FRES money going to the carrier project, and would have exercised more involvement in the MoD’s woeful AFV procurements in the last 20 years.

David Steeper
4 months ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

You think the reason for the last 20 yrs of AFV procurement is the Army weren’t deeply enough involved ?

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
3 months ago
Reply to  David Steeper

We are at cross-purposes David. Many people castigate the army top brass (at the 3* and 4* level) for not getting involved (ie getting a grip) as one of the reasons AFV procurement has gone wrong – I was echoing that thought. There are a heap more reasons too.

David Steeper
3 months ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Think Army should do what they know best. Issue broad min specs for what they want, how many they want how soon and how much they’re willing to pay. Then leave it to experts to pick the best option. If you involve uniforms they’ll pick the one with the highest spec with the most shiny gadgets. Without anyone to explain to them that it isn’t deliverable in time or price or even at all.

Steve
Steve
4 months ago
Reply to  David Barry

Considering the principle role of the army in recent years is to restructure itself endlessly to justify cuts, they probably need a large number of top brass to keep up with all the changes.

Bill
Bill
4 months ago

Too many engineers and ‘signallers’!!!

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
4 months ago
Reply to  Bill

Not enough you mean. Cannot have enough enablers.

Infantry without RE, RA, RS, RLC, and RAMC units will not do much.

It is one of the enduring problems the army inflicts on itself.

The AAC remains woefully small.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
4 months ago

AAC. I remember that we were going to buy 99 Apaches back in the day but it was cut at the last minute to 66 and no-one complained. Of course we are now replacing them with just 50 new models. Interesting that so many (including contributers to these pages) don’t realise that an army structure with (just) 25% being Infantry really is not unusual – that was the ratio from the time I joined the army in 1975. The problem becomes when that is 25% of a very low number. You truly understand the value of significant numbers of enablers.… Read more »

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
4 months ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Yes, I noticed after my post that I omitted the REME! Sorry! They are larger than the RE on current manning.

Ian M
Ian M
4 months ago

Nobody does anything or goes anywhere in anything without the R.E.M.E. 😜

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
4 months ago
Reply to  Ian M

Yep, LAD’s in most units still? Or even a REME Wkshp for bigger vehicle heavy formations?

Ian M
Ian M
4 months ago

LADs with Regts of all types, individual tradesmen specialists with the sneaky beaky’s, Wksps are now called Battalions and provide 3rd line repair and Foward Repair Teams to support units when required. ARTE et MARTE!

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
4 months ago
Reply to  Ian M

Ah yes! The FS Battalions.

Airborne
Airborne
4 months ago
Reply to  Ian M

The best home made bars in the LAD of any and every Regiment, ever!

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
3 months ago

Units with very little or light and simple kit get Att Tdsm REME (Attached Tradesmen REME), usually a dozen to 20 tradesmen under a SSgt/WO2. The REME pers are shown the Establishment of the Unit. Such a unit might be a light role Inf Bn. Next up is the LAD, usually commanded by a Capt – to support units with more kit/more complex kit. Such a unit might be an armoured regt, armoured inf bn. Broadly equivalent to an LAD are Regt Wkps REME to support a unit with unique, low population equipment. The REME can do more in-depth repairs… Read more »

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
3 months ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Yes, as I understood it. Thanks for the outline.
The 1st line Wkshps were the ones I referenced above and was unsure of Wkshp or LAD depending on unit.

The REME battalions have expanded in recent times.

Airborne
Airborne
4 months ago
Reply to  Bill

Never enough CS and CSS!

Watcherzero
Watcherzero
4 months ago

Such high ratio of specialist units like engineers, signallers, logistics, artillery etc.. very low ratio of basic infantryman. Good for plugging the gap in other countries forces but not so much when trying to achieve mass in our own deployments.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
4 months ago
Reply to  Watcherzero

We have had about 25% of the army as Infantry for as long as I can remember (I served 1975-2009). I don’t see that as a problem.

Watcherzero
Watcherzero
4 months ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

When you left the British Army it was 102,000 combat trained personnel its about 25% smaller today with 73,000 against a force requirement of 82,000. That force requirement is scheduled to be cut to 72,500. In 1975 there were about 175,000 army regulars, today the total UK armed forces are about the 34th largest in the world, between Taiwan and Greece and far smaller than Italy. Theres currently 18,000 infantry with this planned to increase to 19,000 however as recently as 2015 this number was 30,000 not including 2,500 Gurkhas making up over 35% of the total.

Last edited 4 months ago by Watcherzero
Graham Moore
Graham Moore
4 months ago
Reply to  Watcherzero

Hi Watchzero, I very well recall the slide in army numbers before, during and after my army service – I have always understood (but not accepted) that the army has been cut once or twice a decade since the end of the Korean War. Philip Hammond, as Chancellor (and an ex Defence Secretary) wanted to see a regular army of just 50,000 – madness! My comment is not about the size of the army or the Infantry specifically, which is woeful – we can deploy one or two BCTs at most and would struggle to deploy a division on a… Read more »

Ian M
Ian M
4 months ago
Reply to  Watcherzero

What you must not forget Mr W is that all tradesmen (women) are trained soldiers first and foremost, so, whilst not called infantry they can acquit themselves very well when needed.
cheers

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
3 months ago
Reply to  Ian M

True, that trained soldier string to their bow is just for self-defence though.

Mark Forsyth
Mark Forsyth
4 months ago

More Vets than Dentists, and more Musicians than PTI’s
Always interesting to see these breakdowns. Sappers took a bit of a dip i n 19/20, but then massive jump in 21 numbers.
For Watcherzero, whilst the HCR is 2 Regts, the numbers also listed and included all in the Royal Armoured Corps.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
4 months ago
Reply to  Mark Forsyth

I think most of RAVC are not trained vets, but handlers for MWD.

Despite endless amalgamations and cuts RCAM still seems considerable with over 600 posts?

Last edited 4 months ago by Daniele Mandelli
Ian M
Ian M
4 months ago

Stretcher bearers and first aiders (Combat medics?)

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
4 months ago
Reply to  Ian M

Yes, true, I believe they do have this role.

Dern
Dern
3 months ago
Reply to  Ian M

They’re not Combat Medics, all Combat Medics in the army are RAMC capbadged.

Ian M
Ian M
3 months ago
Reply to  Dern

Hence the question mark.
Cheers

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
3 months ago

In the old days pretty much every unit had musicians – Regt personnel who doubled often as stretcher bearers.
When CAM (later RCAM) came in the number of musicians plummetted. I am not sure what the deployment situation with RCAM is – would be interesting to see how many get deployed and if so whether in a music or other role.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
3 months ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

I have no idea either. I struggle to keep up with the Bands! A see a String Orchestra has appeared on the strength at Woolwich Garrison?!!

Chris
Chris
4 months ago

I wonder how many there are long term AWOL I mean years?

nigel smith
nigel smith
3 months ago

We are screwed against the Chinese and Russians we don’t have the numbers any more ….

PaulSergeant
PaulSergeant
3 months ago

Gurkha FTTTS 1 Apr 2019 was 2,890 which puts the total up. I don’t have Gurkha numbers for other years but the Army totals are published every quarter. Army FTTTS 1 Oct 2021 was 77,530. A little way to go to cut to 73,000.

David Flandry
David Flandry
3 months ago

Looks like 30 battalions of infantry. Reserves too.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
3 months ago
Reply to  David Flandry

33 regular Inf bns, 16 from the Reserve Army.

David Flandry
David Flandry
3 months ago

Regiment is administrative unit today. The breakdown seems based on battalions to me.

jeanne serrano
jeanne serrano
3 months ago

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8661843/Armys-iconic-bearskin-hats-worn-Queens-Guard-threat.html Tried to do a search on HOW MANY black bears must be sacrificed for queenie’s “TRADITION” of exploiting Canadian provinces (via her pawn puppet Trudeau) accommodating her pathetic continuation of “flaunting the hats from a hundreds of years old battle victory” into the future to adorn her 7 Regiments (could not get an exact number of hats in a regiment — no matter how many ways I tried to word that simple question) annually?