NATO Deputy Secretary General Mircea Geoană visited the Allied Maritime Command (MARCOM) Headquarters in Northwood, United Kingdom.

Mr Geoană met with the Commander of MARCOM, Vice Admiral Mike Utley and other key members of staff.

NATO say here that the Deputy Secretary General and the Commander’s discussions focused on the importance of MARCOM in NATO’s new defence plans and the command’s crucial role in keeping seaways between North America and Europe open.

“After recent damage to Baltic Sea underwater infrastructure, they also discussed how Allied navies and new technologies can better protect undersea infrastructure and the Alliance’s role in shielding subsea cables and pipelines. Mr Geoană further highlighted the need for continued Western support to Ukraine, saying that the cost of allowing Russia to prevail would be far greater than the cost of supporting Ukraine now.

The Deputy Secretary General and the Commander also discussed evolving missile and drone technologies, as well as how NATO can better adapt to the role of artificial intelligence in modern warfare. Warning that the Alliance is facing the greatest security challenges in a generation, Mr Geoană stressed MARCOM’s central role in protecting NATO’s one billion people.”

During his trip to London, Mr Geoană met with the Minister for Defence Procurement, James Cartlidge, and the National Security Advisor for the United Kingdom, Sir Tim Barrow.

The Deputy Secretary General concluded his trip with an opening address at the third edition of the annual NATO Integrated Air and Missile Defence (IAMD) Conference in London.

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George has a degree in Cyber Security from Glasgow Caledonian University and has a keen interest in naval and cyber security matters and has appeared on national radio and television to discuss current events. George is on Twitter at @geoallison
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Frank62
Frank62 (@guest_810722)
1 month ago

If the UK & USA can shoot down drones & missiles targeting Israel, we should be doing the same for UKR. Russia is the escalator here by invading & waging war. They’re counting on our timid complacency. Only a resolute, united & robust response will dter further aggression. US republicans should hang their heads in shame & allow funding to pass, enemies of democracy & freedom.

Chris
Chris (@guest_810725)
1 month ago
Reply to  Frank62

And when Russia targets these US and UK ships? Then what? Nuclear war?

You guys need to chill out. You’re so eager to sign up for a war that nobody wants.

Frank62
Frank62 (@guest_810734)
1 month ago
Reply to  Chris

Appeasement guarantees more wars, tyranny & agression. The sooner we let Putin know we will not stand idly by issuing platitudes, the sooner Putin will back down. Russian pilots already engaged US aircraft in Korea, Vietnam & Israeli in the ’67/73 wars. Putin started this war threatening nukes against anyone who opposed him. The wrong thing to do is back off, allowing him to run riot, we should remind him at every threat that for him to nuke anyone will result in his utter destruction. That’s how deterrents work. They fail when one side holds their hands up & effectively… Read more »

Chris
Chris (@guest_810736)
1 month ago
Reply to  Frank62

Deterrence only works prior to the invasion. The invasion happened in 2022. We missed the boat, most of continental Europe doesn’t actually care, they just want the US to pay for it while they spend on free college/healthcare etc..

Anything else is just signing up to fight someone else’s war. The quicker this one winds down the better the world will be.

SailorBoy
SailorBoy (@guest_810846)
1 month ago
Reply to  Chris

The problem with the modern world is that there is no such thing as someone else’s war any more. Global supply chains and financial systems effectively make it such that everyone feels the hit. You are falling into the American centred view of the rest of the world being this backward place, either soft (in Europe’s case) or rabid warmongers (everywhere else). I think American defence would take the hit just as much as anyone else’s if they pulled back (not out) from Europe. Think about how much European defence money is spent on US high end products like F16,… Read more »

Chris
Chris (@guest_810889)
1 month ago
Reply to  SailorBoy

All the European nations combined have ordered 600 F-35’s. The USAF alone has orders for 1,800, not counting the Navy or Marine Corps!

On top of that they all want to call the shots with weapons integration, industrial offsets etc. it turns the program into a nightmare for minimal gain. You vastly overestimate European defence purchases to the US defence industry’s bottom line.

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker (@guest_810868)
1 month ago
Reply to  Chris

Your dreaming. This will not calm down. The Ukrainians will not unconditionally surrender and putin won’t stop unless forced.
So everyone stops supporting Ukraine they will still fight. Russia will blame the west of any partisan Activity and be bolstered by his victory. Next stop Moldova, then unconventional war in the Baltics, then Europe.
Can you explain what you think peace would look like and how it would work?

Joe16
Joe16 (@guest_811131)
1 month ago
Reply to  Chris

That’s not factually accurate. The EU has explicitly named the Ukraine war as a major factor and focus of interest in their military industrial strategy that’s just been produced and is being implemented. “Continental Europe” will be supplying well over 1 million shells to Ukraine this year. French Caesar SPG production has ramped up to the point that it’s outstripping Ukraine’s losses- so they’re replacing their old soviet-era stuff with one of the newest gun systems out there. France is also opening a new explosives factory and is ramping up production of SCALP cruise missiles again- even though they’re intended… Read more »

Graham M
Graham M (@guest_810745)
1 month ago
Reply to  Chris

Did Frank say ‘ships? I agree that we should not commit forces to the Russo-Ukraine war.

Chris
Chris (@guest_810723)
1 month ago

These wars kicked off because much of the world perceives biden as a weak leader (he is). There is no reason for republicans to finance his international policy failures. Ukraine is going to lose this war, it’s just a matter of how. Russia has already signaled to the west that it will use tactical nuclear weapons on the battlefield at a lower threshold than previously thought. How is that a win for anyone in the west? Ukraine needs to negotiate a truce that probably includes the loss of Crimea and the Donbas. Ukrainian leaders are staunchly in opposition of this,… Read more »

Graham M
Graham M (@guest_810744)
1 month ago
Reply to  Chris

Chris, you seem very sure that Ukraine will lose.
Whilst the USSR/Russia has a track record of invading other countries, they also have a track record of withdrawing when they failed to achieve success. They left Afghanistan in 1989 after 10 years and they left Georgia in 2007. There are many other examples.

Paul T
Paul T (@guest_810757)
1 month ago
Reply to  Graham M

Afghanistan was obviously a nut that no one could crack, the Soviets gave it up for a bad job. Georgia on the other hand was on the point of collapsing, only frantic diplomatic efforts prevented a complete takeover by Russia.

Graham M
Graham M (@guest_810771)
1 month ago
Reply to  Paul T

Sure. My point was that Russian withdrawal is always a possibility, although probably not with Putin at the helm.

Paul T
Paul T (@guest_810831)
1 month ago
Reply to  Graham M

I can’t see Russia pulling out of Ukraine without some form of Victory, negotiated or not.

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker (@guest_810867)
1 month ago
Reply to  Chris

With the correct weapons and equipment they can stop the Russians. Look at what Ukraine has done with hand me downs. The lines only moved when the USA aid stopped. Europe is trying really hard to fill that gap. Russia has burned through equipment at a crazy rate and its massive soviet supplies are mostly down to the less than ideal stuff. The Russian economy is failing only being propped up by the huge rainy day fund which is been used quickly. Most folks give them 2 years before stored equipment is finished and 1 year until the wealth fund… Read more »

Chris
Chris (@guest_810892)
1 month ago
Reply to  Monkey spanker

Russia will use tactical nuclear weapons in Ukraine if they start losing ground. There is no maybe about it.

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker (@guest_810920)
1 month ago
Reply to  Chris

That’s on Russia if they do that and it’s no reason not to support a friendly country that is asking for help. Tactical nukes aren’t as useful as some think. It would draw international condemnation from the world and putin as a leader would be finished. The initial blast would kill people but would also make taking that land extra difficult. There’s a high chance Russia would give radiation poisoning to its own forces through bad CBRN kit and lack of training around it. Look at what the troops did in Chernobyl. Digging in making themselves ill then taking that… Read more »

FieldLander
FieldLander (@guest_810907)
1 month ago
Reply to  Chris

Chris, he only thing I agree with you about is that UKR is going to go down slowly and painfully, if the West (the USA) does not pull its finger out.
Europe, including the UK, are trying ()but oh so slowly), but ultimately the only people with the kit available, now, are on the other side of the pond. Until they have sorted themselves out in November UKR is at risk.

Andrew D
Andrew D (@guest_810864)
1 month ago

Unless the US send more equipment and Ammunition soon to Ukraine it’s going to be game over .Putin may has well have been given the front door 🔑 😟 🇺🇦

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker (@guest_810869)
1 month ago
Reply to  Andrew D

The U.K. on its own could put up the £20b the USA is stalling over. The other $40b would be going to shore up Americas defence sector not Ukraine.
Ukraine has a million shells coming from June with previous orders coming before then.
Germany has stepped up dramatically along with others.
The U.K. needs to do the same.

Graham M
Graham M (@guest_811167)
1 month ago
Reply to  Monkey spanker

The UK did not even spend half a £bn extra on UK’s Defence following the IR23 and DCP23 Refresh reports which sought to glean lessons from the RU-UKR war. In contrast would HMG spend £20bn on Defence in one hit for another country?

We have spent serious money to help UKR – I agree we could do more, but not £20bn more.

Chris
Chris (@guest_810888)
1 month ago
Reply to  Andrew D

It’s already game over. While Russia has plenty of propaganda, so does the west. This very website has posted plenty of western intel psyops as fact. Remember the “Summer offensive”.

Victory is always just one more ‘need’ away. In reality the Russians have an iron grip on the east and a largely sympathetic Russian speaking population in that area.

This isn’t going to be a win, but it could very well be a loss like Vietnam. The best we can hope for is a North Korea/South Korea situation.

Andrew D
Andrew D (@guest_810918)
1 month ago
Reply to  Chris

Agreed Chris 👍

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker (@guest_810962)
1 month ago
Reply to  Chris

The only reason Korea peace worked was that bigger countries had stepped in and the fight had ended up where it started. Without the Chinese and South Korea’s supporters the conduct would never of finished how it did. Nato forces could go 40 miles from the front line and say this is where we stand and this it the proposed border and no man’s land area. The conflict would pause then. Ukraine will not stop fighting and its supporters have the resources to give them what is required to stop Russia moving forward. Getting countries to provide that support is… Read more »

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker (@guest_810963)
1 month ago
Reply to  Chris

I meant to ask, what would peace look like in your eyes? How would it happen?
I would be extremely happy if the conflict ended fairly now. Just want to see what other people’s view point is.

Graham M
Graham M (@guest_811169)
1 month ago
Reply to  Chris

The best that I am hoping for is the withdrawal of Russian forces much as Soviet forces withdrew from Afghanistan in 1988/89, repair of infrastructure/housing damage by international best effort and prosecution of war criminals at the International Criminal Court, The Hague.

FieldLander
FieldLander (@guest_811009)
1 month ago

The West has failed to deal with Putin for nearly 20 years. I am not sure you can deal with any totalitarian regime that has nuclear weapons if they wish to take territory and are unconcerned about their own losses unless effective MAD applies. It will not for a territorial dispute like this.
Europe and the UK are trying, but unless the US will comes to its collective senses and releases the kit they have, but currently cannot, UKR risks going down.
God help us if DJT does well in November. UKR will be the least of the potential concerns.