Air Chief Marshal Sir Stuart Peach, Chairman of the NATO Military Committee and senior military advisor to the Secretary General, has visisted Ukraine.

NATO say that Air Chief Marshal Peach met with the President of Ukraine, Mr. Volodymyr Zelenskyy and the Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces of Ukraine, Colonel-General Ruslan Khomchak.

In a news release, the Alliance say that the Chairman visited the National Land Forces Academy, attended briefings on the NATO – Ukraine partnership, international training missions’ progress, as well as the security situation in and around Ukraine. Air Chief Marshal Peach paid his respects and laid a wreath at the Ministry of Defence’s Hall of Memory.

“Meeting with President Zelenskyy, the Chairman reaffirmed NATO’s valued partnership with Ukraine and its full support of Ukraine’s sovereignty and territorial integrity. Discussions centred on Ukraine’s wide-ranging defence reforms, the developments in Ukraine and the Black Sea region, Ukraine’s continued support to NATO’s Resolute Support Mission in Afghanistan, the Kosovo Force in Kosovo, as well as NATO’s Response Force.”

The Chairman of the Military Committee stated:

“The Alliance commends President Zelenskyy’s commitment to a peaceful resolution of the conflict in eastern Ukraine. NATO Allies are united in their condemnation of Russia’s illegal annexation of Crimea, and its aggressive actions in eastern Ukraine. We call on Russia to end its support for militants in eastern Ukraine and withdraw its forces from Ukrainian territory. Ukraine is one of NATO’s closest and most important partners.”

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
24 Comments
oldest
newest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
J Mulley
J Mulley
6 months ago

Ukraine should join NATO to show Mr Putin we can also play games.

dan
dan
6 months ago

Probably told them NATO won’t lift a figure if Putin invades them just like last time. Ugh.

Andrew D
Andrew D
6 months ago

I think we should keep out of it ,got a friend from Ukraine he and is family had to get out for for safety .He work for the law he told Ukraine is very corrupt is it worth us getting involved with a government like this.

Frank62
Frank62
6 months ago
Reply to  Andrew D

Yet we support & defend abominable regimes in the middle east. Where will the west draw the line fr Putin?

Rob
Rob
6 months ago

This Russian vs Ukraine build up is all getting very serious now. I would hazard a guess that it could all get very serious very quickly if either side miscalculates. Now if the worst happened and Ukraine was captured by Russia NATO most certainly would be putting several Divisions into Romania & Slovakia, reinforcing the Black Sea and moving air assets from CONUS to eastern Europe.

Lets just hope Putin isn’t that mad.

Mark B
Mark B
6 months ago

Putin will just keep crossing lines until eventually he crosses a line that the West will not ignore. Need to send a strong clear message. The Russians do not respect weakness.

Andrew D
Andrew D
6 months ago
Reply to  Mark B

All this going on and yet UK still cut ,now will our government wake up 🛌

Gareth
Gareth
6 months ago
Reply to  Andrew D

Quite. Cutting our armed forces merely emboldens adversaries. Governments still can’t figure out that to prepare for emergencies is far cheaper than not preparing for them

Gavin Gordon
Gavin Gordon
6 months ago

In my opinion we, as in NATO or suitable constituent members, must support Ukraine by facing down Putin, when or if this latest provocation escalates. Further sanctions will already have been factored into Putin’s calculation. So, although they would be applied, a forthright military response should constitute an indivisible part of the package (communicated via SALT* talks, in my view). Russia’s in depth moves hardly conform to an exercise, and even if on this occasion they did, then what’s their intended purpose, ultimately? Dictators cannot own the narrative at will. Democratic cooperative engagement is the ultimate raison d’etre for NATO-type… Read more »

Mike Hannah
Mike Hannah
6 months ago
Reply to  Gavin Gordon

I cannot agree more. Putin will see NATO in action over Ukraine as a sign of weakness and his next target will be one of the NATO Baltic members. He won’t stop at Ukraine!! A show of force now will make Putin think again.
Ukraine has many problems and Russia is doing its best to keep the country destabilised .

geoff
geoff
6 months ago

It is a sobering thought that the actions of just one human being can threaten the whole world with catastrophe. History just keeps repeating itself and illustrates that mankind is basically controlled by the lowest common denominator. The fact that Germany is the land of Bach and Beethoven and(alongside of us) houses the worlds most skilled Engineers and high civilisation, did not prevent Hitler from unleashing his evil on the planet. So what to do? Some firm behind the scenes diplomacy coupled with a discreet show of force from Nato in support of Ukraine has to be the measured response.… Read more »

Frank62
Frank62
6 months ago
Reply to  geoff

Unless NATO(including the UK) takes defence far more seriously & builds strength rather than pusuing ever weakening cuts, authoriatarianism will grow. Our voice just becomes high pitched noise to be ignored without the big stick to enforce our views & the world becomes a far more dangerous place.
If Putin is allowed to take the Ukraine, the writing is on the wall for the Baltics & Nato shows it is too weak to matter.

Jan van der Werk
Jan van der Werk
6 months ago

With Biden as Potus, Merkel needing gas and Sinophile Johnson obsessed with domestic control of the UK what will happen? Words, a few sanctions against individuals and faux outrage. I say again, and face facts. Gorbachev was given assurances about Nato influence and the eastern sphere. Those assurances were broken. Russians are only doing what Russians do so well. Testing the water, then reacting because they see the weakness. Ethnic Russians in Ukraine want to be part of Mother Russia. Many Ukrainians fought on Hitler’s side in The Great Patriotic War. They are a people with long memories and a… Read more »

Gavin Gordon
Gavin Gordon
6 months ago

You are indeed correct, Jan, about early 90’s western assurances to Moscow. These held out for what, possibly unfortunately, constitutes a long time in politics; being generously defined as anything in excess of five years here rather than a week. Even so, there is of course a more than subtle difference in the eventual actions of western NATO democracies and in essence Putin’s Russia. These eastern democracies primarily requested membership – led by Poland, Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary I believe. Others followed suit to be in the same club, or not to be left out. Considering the dire state… Read more »

Jan van der Werk
Jan van der Werk
6 months ago
Reply to  Gavin Gordon

Hi Gavin, I now hold the view that when Warpac dissolved Nato should have done also. Instead it became a bigger “club” and had the effect of boxing in Russia. Of course what is given as an “assurance” by politicians is meaningless unless it is a legally binding treaty. Maybe those eastern countries should not have been accepted, hindsight is a luxury. I can understand national pride on the part of Russia being hurt, loss of influence is what Putin has laboured to rectify, although China will happily march into Russia for resources one day, that alliance is very precarious… Read more »

dave12
dave12
6 months ago

Funny you go on about treaties being broken Ivan ,Russia broke its promise to the Ukraine that if the Ukraine gave up its nukes Russia will not threaten , and when the Ukraine people decided to oust their Russian puppet leader Putin threw a hissy fit. Its also not NATO’s fault that former nations occupied by the kremlin wanted to join western sphere of influence considering they are democracies ,Rich economies and free with futures ,so no wonder they turned away from Putins mafia state dragging them down, I take it you have never lived in a democracy because your… Read more »

Jan van der Werk
Jan van der Werk
6 months ago
Reply to  dave12

Four out of ten for effort.
Big fail.

dave12
dave12
6 months ago

Its just a reply to you’re poor disillusioned mind Ivan its not hard ,enjoy your 7 rubles an hour work lol.

Gavin Gordon
Gavin Gordon
6 months ago

Appreciate your response, Jan. Share a number of your opinions on international relationships, if not all perspectives. But that’s debate (there’s still a hell of a lot of it out there on the quiet, if not so evident among ‘angry young persons’ with trigger digits). With regard to views expressed, I suppose we’ll know soon enough.

Jan van der Werk
Jan van der Werk
6 months ago
Reply to  Gavin Gordon

I love the term trigger digits, may l offer a humble response? I follow Ron Pauls philosophy of none intervention broadly. Yes, by all means defend what is rightfully and legally yours, but strictly no foreign interventions to impose your views. Then the world is sadly influenced too much by corporate and banking greed. I feel much of the imposition of “liberal democracy” has not been to improve international situations but to further corporate interests. Western governments are plagued by lobbyists, particularly the US. That, in turn leads to unneeded and unlawful military adventures. “Voters” generally do not take a… Read more »

Gavin Gordon
Gavin Gordon
6 months ago

No issue with any of that, really, whilst wholeheartedly acknowledging private interest (cut to the chase and call it corrupt). Whilst on the subject, the UK needs to get rid of the Upper House, an obscenity. Any justification for a much smaller re-Assembly would be on the strict lines of a few nationally accepted and voted for experts in their field. I speak as centre-right, by the way. I do consider the electorate i.e. ‘an amorphous distillation of millions of mostly unvoiced impressions’ (which constitutes my attempt at a definition) as politically credit worthy whether or not Churchill was impressed… Read more »

Expat
Expat
6 months ago

But surely by your own reconning you’d have to agree that nukes and mutually assured destruction has contributed to world peace. Ironically Ukraine surrender of it nukes may have assured its own destruction.

Expat
Expat
6 months ago

Winston Churchill had many a thing to say on democracy. How is that word “democracy” to be interpreted? My idea of it is that the plain, humble, common man, just the ordinary man who keeps a wife and family, who goes off to fight for his country when it is in trouble, goes to the poll at the appropriate time, and puts his cross on the ballot paper showing the candidate he wishes to be elected to Parliament—that he is the foundation of democracy. And it is also essential to this foundation that this man or woman should do this… Read more »

Albert H
Albert H
6 months ago

The majority of corespondents miss the point vis-a-vis the situation with Ukraine and Russia Ukrainian Armed Forces are a far cry from those that existed when Russia annnexed Crimea, with the exception of the Ukrainian Navy and interferred in the DONBAS Ukraine now has the second largest Army in Europe second only to that of Russia and is receiving considerable support from NATO in re-euiptment and training especially from POLAND which is by the way no mean military power itself. The Baltic States have a permanent Allied Airforce ‘in waiting. Whilst to my mind there is no doubt that if… Read more »