Canadian, Danish, Dutch, Polish, German, Norwegian and French warships faced off against HMS Queen Elizabeth and her Carrier Strike group as part of an exercise.

Standing NATO Maritime Group One (SNMG1) ships HDMS Absalon and HMCS Halifax were joined by HNLMS Van Amstel, ORP Generał. K. Pułaski, FGS Spessart, HDMS Hvidbjørnen and FS Bretagne, under the command of Commodore Bradley Peats. Task Group simulated a belligerent naval adversary for the UK CSG according to the fictional Strike Warrior exercise scenario.

Joint Warrior, known this year as Strike Warrior, is UK-led multinational exercise held twice a year in the waters around the United Kingdom and is designed to exercise a wide range of high-readiness warfighting capabilities across land, sea and air units in coordinated joint operations. The Royal Navys ay that the exercise “provides realistic multi-threat scenarios within a safe operating environment into which NATO Allies and partner nations formations, units and staffs can deploy and undertake collective training in preparation for any upcoming joint deployments”.

SNMG1 and its consorts began the exercise with a brief Combat Enhancement/Force Integration Training programme in the waters off Northwest Scotland known as the Minch. This phase ensured that participating units were fully integrated into the task group and ready to conduct various high-intensity operations and assume specific roles/responsibilities as part of the exercise.

Following this phase, NATO say that the Group entered the free-play phase where units reacted to unscripted events as they happened and interacted with the UK CSG opposition forces in a variety of realistic operational scenarios.

“SNMG1 is proud to have played a vital role in enhancing mutual operational readiness and interoperability with our fellow NATO Allies and partners, especially the UK CSG,” said Commodore Bradley Peats, Commander of SNMG1.

“Large multinational training exercises like Joint Warrior improve NATO’s overall defence capabilities while enhancing its responsiveness to deploy high-readiness military forces to conduct coordinated joint operations against various current and future threats, which supports the NATO Readiness Initiative.”

You can read more from NATO here.

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
29 Comments
oldest
newest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Dern
Dern
1 month ago

Beats a wolfpack of P2000’s as an Opfor doesn’t it?

Pete
Pete
1 month ago
Reply to  Dern

Certainly does. Wonder if subs were involved?

Gareth
Gareth
1 month ago
Reply to  Pete

If I remember correctly there was a report on here a few days ago of a Wildcat performing an at-sea replenishment with an Astute class sub in the same area, so quite likely.

Captain P Wash
Captain P Wash
1 month ago
Reply to  Pete

They came on at Half Time. 😎

Pete
Pete
1 month ago
Reply to  Captain P Wash

Boom boom

Gareth
Gareth
1 month ago
Reply to  Captain P Wash

I wonder if the nuclear subs “warmed up” before coming on?

David
David
1 month ago
Reply to  Captain P Wash

God in heaven, mary, josef, jesus and the wee donkey, did you have to?

😉

Andrew D
Andrew D
1 month ago

CSG really testing them selfs good show 💪

Ron
Ron
1 month ago

They are really putting the CSG through the wringer. It looks like a good work up. I wonder how they faired.

Mr Bell
Mr Bell
1 month ago
Reply to  Ron

I would love to know that too. Also in the simulated Harrier attack against CSG by US marines I wonder how many harriers survived the type 45 defensive screen or the F35B CAP ventured onto them by Merlins with crowsnest.
I would have thought all those harriers would have had a really bad day. Outclassed.

expat
expat
1 month ago

I think in similar exercise with a US carrier group a Swedish sub, HSMS Gotland, was able to make a number of attack runs on the US carrier completely undetected. Had it be for real the carrier would have been lost.

captain p wash
captain p wash
1 month ago
Reply to  expat

If the Gotland had actually launched a Torpedo though, I guess things might have been different, not sure how many hits would be required for the carrier to be actually lost but you can bet the USN learned a big lesson either way.

dan
dan
1 month ago
Reply to  captain p wash

Yep. And that was many years ago. A lot of new anti-sub tech on the ships/aircraft/helos now.

Expat
Expat
1 month ago
Reply to  dan

It wasn’t to long ago less than 5 year’s

Gavin Gordon
Gavin Gordon
1 month ago
Reply to  captain p wash

Chinese sub popped up in the middle of a US SG to say hello a few years back. Another big learning opportunity. Not heard of it happening since. If they try it with our GSG we’ll know if they succeed, but not if they’re sent packing I suppose.

David
David
1 month ago
Reply to  Gavin Gordon

On the other hand, perhaps they let the sub surface by keeping their abilities secret.

Expat
Expat
1 month ago
Reply to  captain p wash

I would bet a salvo of topedos would be fired by an attacking sub. At best its a protracted session in dry Dock.

Mr Bell
Mr Bell
1 month ago
Reply to  expat

I wouldnt be so sure. Ever read about USS America’s sinkex? When the US navy deliberately tried to sink a 70,000 ton carrier to see how much punishment the ship could take. After days of continuous attacks from air, surface and subsurface the result was that the ship wouldnt sink. The USN demolition experts had to go onboard. Open all valves. Open all blast doors and bulkheads and water tight doors and set demolition charges. Carriers are tough ships.

Crabfat
Crabfat
1 month ago
Reply to  Mr Bell

Anyone remember the oil tanker Torrey Canyon years ago (no, you are all too young, I’m sure)? Anyway, it ran aground off the coast of Cornwall, in 1967 and began to spill millions of gallons of oil onto the Cornish coast. The government of the day decided to blow it up and set fire to the oil, so called in RAF and FAA jets, which spent tow days bombing the vessel, to little effect. To quote Wiki… “The RAF and the Royal Navy were (also) subject to ridicule as a result of their efforts to assist in resolving the matter,… Read more »

Captain P Wash
Captain P Wash
1 month ago
Reply to  Crabfat

Bum, Just read your post mate ! Exactly, it was a bit of a disaster in more ways than one.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
1 month ago
Reply to  Crabfat

Interesting.

I was not born yet. And yes had never heard of this!

Captain P Wash
Captain P Wash
1 month ago
Reply to  Mr Bell

Absolutely mate…. Also, take a look at the attempts to destroy the “Torrey Canyon” by Hunters and Buccaneers and Sea Vixens…. 🤔

Expat
Expat
1 month ago
Reply to  Mr Bell

OK you could say it would survive. But assuming the attack sub would launch a salvo of torpedoes its not going to be a happy day on board the career followed by a return to Port and a lengthy dry docking.

Gavin Gordon
Gavin Gordon
1 month ago
Reply to  expat

I always assume that an Akula’s around somwhere testing its luck. Be nice to think so, and that we knew whereabouts. Now that’s an exercise result.

Mr Bell
Mr Bell
1 month ago
Reply to  Ron

Wouldnt worry there are a whole stream of photos on Twitter. Great to see. Definitely in the public domain and wonderful sight.

Nic
Nic
1 month ago

Dont forget the Russian shadowing ship

JJ Smallpiece
JJ Smallpiece
1 month ago

So who is deemed to have been sunk?

Ian L
Ian L
1 month ago

There is a full set of photographs of the aircraft carriers and other ships on the offical Royal Navy website in the latest news section.Also a report on the government MOD website.