The latest P-8 Poseidon, seven of nine, is due to be delivered to the Royal Air Force in Scotland after being named (the name isn’t Annika Hansen).

The aircraft was recently named ‘William Barker VC’. According to the Royal Air Force here:

“The UK’s seventh Poseidon MRA Mk1 Maritime Patrol Aircraft will be known as ‘William Barker VC’ in honour of the Canadian pilot awarded a Victoria Cross whilst serving with 201 Squadron in the First World War. 

In October 1918, Major Barker was flying a Sopwith Snipe overhead the Western Front when he became embroiled in a dogfight with 15 enemy aircraft.  Despite being wounded three times in the legs and having his left elbow blown away, he managed to control his biplane and disable three enemy aircraft before making a forced landing.”

Seven of the nine aircraft have also now been named.

  1. ZP801 “Pride of Moray”
  2. ZP802 “City of Elgin”
  3. ZP803 “Terence Bulloch DSO*DFC”
  4. ZP804 “Spirit of Reykjavik”
  5. ZP805 “Fulmar”
  6. ZP806 “Guernsey’s Reply”
  7. ZP807 “William Barker VC”

201 Squadron operates the Poseidon in the anti-submarine warfare role from RAF Lossiemouth on the Moray Firth in Scotland.  The RAF Poseidon fleet, which will total nine aircraft, is already providing maritime patrol capabilities working side-by-side with the Royal Navy and other Allies to secure the seas around the UK and abroad.

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
62 Comments
oldest
newest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Steve Salt
Steve Salt
26 days ago

Bit disappointed John Cruickshank`s been overlooked again.

James William Fennell
James William Fennell
26 days ago
Reply to  Steve Salt

Maybe he hasn’t? Still two more airframes to be delivered.

Steve Salt
Steve Salt
26 days ago

I know, but as hes still with us Id love to see him at the naming ceremony and he`s not getting any younger.

Steve S
Steve S
25 days ago
Reply to  Steve Salt

Was asked but he didn’t want to be on one or the building so his wishes quite rightly are being respected.

Steve Salt
Steve Salt
24 days ago
Reply to  Steve S

Thanks for the info, thats a great shame, but if thats his wish so be it.

RobW
RobW
26 days ago

I see what you did there, although she still goes by “Seven” in the new Picard series. Anyway enough of shaming myself.

Great news that the capability is building up. I’m also a fan of how these are being named. Perhaps we could roll that out across other platforms.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
25 days ago
Reply to  RobW

I’d suggested that too. Railway engines have names so why not other aircraft.

Lusty
Lusty
25 days ago

We could name a Merlin after Lusty. 😀

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
25 days ago
Reply to  Lusty

We could! And it is. “Lusty Friday” soon!

While we’re at it, let’s raise from the dead old lost regiments by giving sub units or CS CSS Regiments some names rather than just numbers?

They like rebranding and publicity, well the options would be endless with our history militarily.

Geoff Roach
Geoff Roach
25 days ago

Hi Daniele,
Long time ,no blog…
Here’s another name Captain. Johhnie Walker R.N.,C.B. D.S.O. and three bars. Two claims to fame.(1) as commander of HMS Stork and HMS Starling he was THE U Boat killer of WW11.(2) He was my Dad’s boss right through the war. A good name for a sub hunter I think.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
25 days ago
Reply to  Geoff Roach

Hi Geoffrey, yes, long time no see.
Hope you’re well.

Geoff Roach
Geoff Roach
25 days ago

I am, thank you

Alan Reid
Alan Reid
25 days ago
Reply to  Geoff Roach

Evening lads, enjoyed reading your comments.

One could also say that it’s good to see No.1 squadron Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS) still going strong! From Sopwith Pup to the Poseidon!

A deffo yes to Johnnie Walker for airframe number 8!

Apart from Barker, I hope they honour another pilot from the squadron’s history and name airframe number 9, “Warneford, V.C”. The first airman to bring down a German airship.

Last edited 25 days ago by Alan Reid
Quentin D63
Quentin D63
25 days ago
Reply to  Alan Reid

If you can permit me to be a touch flippant…. Johnnie Walker… being a well known whisky too… might need to check if it’s.. Johnny Walker…. with the catchphrase…. Still Going Strong… coukd be apt.

Alan Reid
Alan Reid
24 days ago
Reply to  Quentin D63

😀

Geoff Roach
Geoff Roach
25 days ago
Reply to  Alan Reid

Thanks for the kind thought Alan. You never know!

Alan Reid
Alan Reid
24 days ago
Reply to  Geoff Roach

👍

Lusty
Lusty
25 days ago

Could do! On that notion, one (or two?) thing(s) I’d like to see is the return of HMS Hornet and HMS Rooke. HMS Hornet was the Coastal Forces base in Gosport. HMS Rooke was the name given to HMNB Gibraltar. Now, the former of those two is tricky, given the assets have long since closed. Perhaps it’s the perfect name to give to a new building or complex within the existing base. Whilst they have shrunk since their height, Gibraltar’s facilities could be commissioned with ease I would assume, particularly as it’s still referred to as ‘HMNB’ in contemporary texts… Read more »

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
25 days ago
Reply to  Lusty

That’s interesting. On my file I keep I still have the naval facilities as HMS Rooke. I assumed it was still current not expired.

HMS Hornet, that passed me by wasn’t aware of that. Was that close to Fort Blockhouse or the old SETT?

I suppose Woodward does sound better than Mere Harbour.

Lusty
Lusty
25 days ago

I’m pretty sure it’s not current though I’m happy to be corrected by someone if it’s still used. If not, I’d damn well raise the case for it!

Hornet was located close to Blockhouse, yes. The building and facilities are now Hornet sailing club.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
25 days ago
Reply to  Lusty

I was curious so checked my data base.

I actually have Rooke as being the RN Accommodation & Admin Centre within HMNB, rather than the HMNB itself.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
25 days ago

Like you, happy to be corrected but you know I always defer to you on RN matters.😀

Lusty
Lusty
25 days ago

Too kind. 😥

(just allow for some fun tomorrow)

Lusty
Lusty
25 days ago

Yes, that sounds about right from memory.

However, with the shrinking/consolidation of facilities there and the bases in the UK following a similar convention (Drake, Nelson), it would be nice to see it used for what’s currently there (boat sheds, warehousing, admin, storage).

Onto planes, sure. I’d support naming A400M/C17/Voyager and other larger aircraft.

Steve M
Steve M
25 days ago

the RAF VC-10’s were all named after VC holders so it’s not a ‘new’ thing

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
25 days ago
Reply to  Steve M

Yes that’s true. I was aware of that but had forgotten it. Why not name a Warrior “Johnson Beharry” as an example. After what he did to G Brown he will ALWAYS be a hero to me!

Tarnish
Tarnish
26 days ago

Landed at Lossie 1644 on the 19th!

John Manning.
John Manning.
25 days ago
Reply to  Tarnish

How about THE GREAT HUNTER NIMROD.

Alan Reid
Alan Reid
24 days ago
Reply to  John Manning.

I’m with you, John.
We’ve debated the Nimrod MRA4 cancellation many times on this forum – the subject always produces incredulity, but with strong opinions on both sides of the argument.

Geoffi
Geoffi
25 days ago

Will be assimilating Russian submarines soon, then.
At the rate of knots Boeing is going with these P-9 deliveries, seems a bit odd how long the E-7s are going to take. I guess its more to do with mission equipment complexity being fitted

expat
expat
25 days ago
Reply to  Geoffi

P-8 are in production so to speak, was as E-7s aren’t so its more of a bepsoke manufacturing process or conversion so takes longer.

John N
John N
25 days ago
Reply to  Geoffi

That’s like comparing apples and oranges. Boeing has now produced more than 120 P-8A from one single US production line, it should be working very efficiently by now, and it is. On the other hand, E-7A production has been spread across four nations, the UK will be the fifth location. The first two Wedgetail for the RAAF were built in the US, the next four here in Oz, for a total of six. Same for South Korea (4) and Turkey (4), the first for each was made in the US, then the last three in county. And now three in… Read more »

JohninMK
JohninMK
25 days ago
Reply to  John N

Also, ours at least are second hand airframes, so different but probably more work than building from scratch.

John N
John N
25 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

New or a second hand airframe shouldn’t make any difference.

Wedgetail is the result of a ‘conversion’, take a commercial B737-700 airframe, strip it down, modify, add all the new components.

Here’s a video of the first RAAF E-7A during its airframe manufacture and conversion:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=tpMk9R2vSSM

Poseidon on the other hand is not a conversion, yes the airframe is based on a B737-800, but it is purpose built from start to finish, in-line production.

John N
John N
25 days ago

Talking of the E-7A, it appears the USAF is getting closer to potentially replacing the ageing E-3 fleet with Wedgetail:

https://breakingdefense.com/2021/10/the-us-air-force-just-inched-closer-to-buying-boeings-e-7a-wedgetail/?_ga=2.260527949.1516622829.1634561566-1707674405.1609351286

Steve M
Steve M
25 days ago

Good news but we still need more 🙁 All these merry few can do is provide snapshots of an area, Nuc boats can be 1 side of this during they patrol as not 24;/7 even if P-8 goes back to same area next day Nuc boat gone past and disappearing further away, without enough t-26 to have perm patrol line above or below SOSUS line have no way of keeping tabs on them.

Peregrine16
Peregrine16
25 days ago
Reply to  Steve M

Can drones plug the gap do you think?

Bob
Bob
25 days ago
Reply to  Peregrine16

If they can monitor sonar buoy arrays as stated then they should be quite useful I would have thought?

Deep32
Deep32
25 days ago
Reply to  Steve M

For a OOA deployer coming down from the North, you usually find NATO assets get involved from the start, so it doesn’t just fall to the UK to police the areas.

Steve M
Steve M
25 days ago
Reply to  Deep32

I know it’s a team game but Norway only have 6 P-3 being replaced by 5 P-8, i don’t how many US p-8’s are at Keflavik but still North Cape down to SLOC’s is a big chunk of water for 14(13) aircraft to cover, even if they fly a lot with 3 or 4 crews per airframe? We have (or will) only have 8 ASW frigates and Norway has 4 and only 15? subs between us and that’s IF everything is operational. I just feel the amount of work being expected will lead to hi fatigue rates on the ships/aircraft… Read more »

Deep32
Deep32
25 days ago
Reply to  Steve M

Its not as bad as it sounds, the Danes, Germans and Dutch also get involved, as does the USN contributing both ships and SSN’s.

It goes without saying that the ‘peace dividend’ saw the draw down of NATO ASW assets to an all time low – a capability only just beginning to be reversed.

We appear to be setting a lot of faith in drones too, hopefully that faith will not be misplaced, as numbers of ASW assets across the board are far too low with all NATO members, barring the USA.

Steve M
Steve M
25 days ago
Reply to  Deep32

Feel the Danes/Germans will be stretched covering Baltic with their 5 p-8’s and 8 ASW capable ships, the dutch don’t really have ASW capability. But i was forgetting the might French Navy will be there too!

Deep32
Deep32
25 days ago
Reply to  Steve M

There is not much to cover in the Baltic these days,most of what the Russians have is surface units and aircraft, with the odd Kilo class SSK.

At its height there were only really SSK’s prowling around in there, as realistically its to confined and shallow for SSN ops. That can all be covered by surface assets, and most of the sea is well within range of ASW helicopters, leaving the ASW units to go further afield – ie Atlantic when needed.

Steve M
Steve M
25 days ago
Reply to  Deep32

Hopefully it will be good, i know there are fewer subs but they are quieter which means same size area with less targets but smaller detection areas

David Steeper
David Steeper
25 days ago
Reply to  Steve M

There subs are quieter but our sonars are more sensitive. We’ve got the edge on them. Their resistance is futile.

Last edited 25 days ago by David Steeper
Quentin D63
Quentin D63
25 days ago
Reply to  Steve M

With you Steve. Germany has just ordered 5 P8s. Are there any plans for a possible another 3 or so for the RAF? Could be money well spent and the delivery time seems to be very efficient along with the maximising pooled logistics, spares, weaponry.

OkamsRazor
OkamsRazor
25 days ago
Reply to  Steve M

We have more there called UAV

DP
DP
25 days ago
Reply to  Steve M

I’m still hoping we’ll add the maritime pod planned to be used on the Sea Guardian UAVs for our Protector fleet. Maybe base half of them up at Lossie or Kinloss to cut transit time to the GIUK gap, augmenting P8 operations.

Charles Verrier
Charles Verrier
25 days ago

Is it me, or is this the lowest-drama bit of defence procurement in a very long time?

Geoffi
Geoffi
25 days ago

Probably because it was the most necessary…

Jonathan
Jonathan
25 days ago

love the little Jeri Ryan tribute in there.

Mark Forsyth
Mark Forsyth
25 days ago
Reply to  Jonathan

  :wpds_smile: 😀

Crabfat
Crabfat
25 days ago

Going a little sideways from this topic and following up the breakingdefence.com link that John N supplied below, I came across this link re the chronic cock-ups of MoD (and UK Govt) procurement. Very succinct and just what us bloggers have been saying for years.

https://breakingdefense.com/2021/09/the-problem-at-the-heart-of-uk-defense/

Crabfat
Crabfat
25 days ago
Reply to  Crabfat

Correction ‘…link that John N supplied above…’

Paul T
Paul T
25 days ago

I’ll put my Hat into the Ring – how about one named after Eric ‘Winkle’ Brown ?.

Mark Forsyth
Mark Forsyth
24 days ago
Reply to  Paul T

Now that would be a great choice.

Alan Reid
Alan Reid
24 days ago
Reply to  Paul T

Another brilliant suggestion – our greatest pilot!

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
24 days ago

Is it generally agreed that the P-8 Poseidon is a better MPA that Nimrod MRA.4 would have been?

Alan Reid
Alan Reid
23 days ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Hi Graham – we’ve had some good-natured stramashes on this forum about the cancellation of Nimrod MRA4. Nimrod MRA4 was a bespoke solution to the RAF’s needs and in terms of operational performance would have out-classed the Poseidon. After a costly and protracted development: to the incredulity of the armed forces, the industry, and the project teams – the MoD cancelled the aircraft when it was finally working, and entering service. To cover up the incoherence of the decision, it was spun that the wings didn’t fit, and the aircraft was a death-trap – all nonsense. It can be argued… Read more »

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
23 days ago
Reply to  Alan Reid

Thanks Alan. I am sure that many who worked on MRA4 were devastated and astonished that it had been cancelled, when the capability was excellent, at least 3 aircraft had been mostly or completely built and a key training course for the RAF personnel was days away from starting. The Treasury had originally fought BAE’s proposal to build new airframes and forced the rework of existing airframes – a poor judgement call – which lead to the ‘wings don’t fit’ episode, which added cost. It meant the end of the British-designed & built military aircraft industry, as we had stopped… Read more »

Alan Reid
Alan Reid
23 days ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Hi Graham
There is some evidence from BAE sources that “wings didn’t fit” is a myth.
https://www.secretprojects.co.uk/threads/bae-systems-nimrod-mra-4.32010/
The evidence suggests difficulties with MRA4 were a failure of project management.

Heidfirst
Heidfirst
1 minute ago

Next one ZP808 arrived RAF Lossiemouth this morning.