Noting the restrictions currently in place on the UK population during the effort to combat the spread of the Coronavirus, the Royal Air Force has suspended all displays from its various teams and bands until further notice.

This suspension follows the similar announcement this week of the pause in the Red Arrows display season.

“This decision will affect the following formations: Battle of Britain Memorial Flight, the Typhoon Display team, the Queen’s Colour Squadron, the Chinook Display team, the RAF Falcons, the Grob Tutor Display Team, RAF Music Services, all RAF voluntary bands, and the RAF Pipe Band. No decision has been taken on this year’s display season for all RAF display teams. The RAF will work with event organisers and adapt to the rapidly changing situation as it develops.”

Earlier, we reported that the Farnborough International Airshow has been cancelled.

A statement on the Farnborough International Airshow website reads:

“It is with great regret that we announce the Farnborough International Airshow 2020, due to take place in July, is cancelled. After very careful consideration, the unprecedented impact of the global Coronavirus pandemic has forced this decision in the interests of the health and safety of our exhibitors, visitors, contractors and staff. This decision was reached taking into consideration several major factors surrounding the outbreak of COVID-19, all of which we have concluded, make it is impossible for us to create and host the Airshow this July. 

We understand this news will be an incredible disappointment to all across the international aerospace industry, not to mention our important exhibitors, suppliers and visitors. We at Farnborough International share your disappointment that we are unable to present the Airshow as planned , but rest assured, we are determined to continue to work together and will ensure  the Farnborough International Airshow  returns in 2022 better than ever.  It’s important to us that we speak directly to anyone who may have concerns about the Airshow’s cancellation; however, we are a small team and it may take a few days for us to make contact. We appreciate your patience, these are incredibly difficult times but we are absolutely committed to maintaining strong relationships.”

Farnborough International Airshow is a trade show for the defence and aviation industries. The organisers announced in 2019 that there will be no public days from 2020 onwards. The show will reduce from 7 to 5 days, dropping the entire weekend section. Instead, they were planning to offer access to the public on Fridays.

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Andy P
Andy P
5 months ago

With all these different display teams are there any crabfats actually doing their core 9 to 4 (wednesday afternoons off for sport of course) day jobs ?

Alan Reid
Alan Reid
5 months ago
Reply to  Andy P

Hi Andy, There was a time when almost every aircraft type in the RAF inventory had its own display team – 1980s for instance: Tornado GR1, Tornado F2, Jaguar, Buccaneer, Phantom, Lightning, Harrier GR3 (plus the FAA Sea Harrier!), Nimrod, Hercules, and the Jet Provost – and the Hawk. Plus helicopters – Puma and Chinook, and the FAA’s Sea King & Lynx. And the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight! And the Red Arrows! And they had to fight the Cold War, as well! To maintain skills and flight safety, when manoeuvring so close to the ground in front of thousands… Read more »

Andy P
Andy P
5 months ago
Reply to  Alan Reid

Aye, I grew up next to RAF Leuchars and loved watching all that stuff. Was just having a wee dig at the RAF’s hours Alan, they’re not renowned for doing evenings and weekends.

Alan Reid
Alan Reid
5 months ago
Reply to  Andy P

Hi Andy, Those were the days! I made that trip to RAF Leuchars almost every year until 2013. Thanks for the memories! LOL

Crabfat
Crabfat
5 months ago
Reply to  Andy P

Hi Andy OK, I’ll rise to the bait… not sure where you get this fantasy air force from. I was one of those who (for most of my 24 years’ service) was constantly working a shift pattern – days, nights, weekends, Christmas Day, New Year’s Day etc. You name it I worked it. And, for many years, down a hole. Yes, some guys (and girls) got time off for sport – as in all three services – but that left a gap in the manning scheme, which others had to fill. Nevertheless, I had a great time in the RAF,… Read more »

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
5 months ago
Reply to  Crabfat

Down a hole.

ASCS Force in an R3?

Crabfat
Crabfat
5 months ago

Sorry Daniele – I’d have to kill you…

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
5 months ago
Reply to  Crabfat

Fair one.

Andy P
Andy P
5 months ago
Reply to  Crabfat

Just pandering to the ‘reputation’ mate. Guilty confession time, I did 4 years as a crab before going to the dark (blue) side. I also spent time down holes working shifts, Pitreavie as was. No insult intended, all about the #bants….

Crabfat
Crabfat
5 months ago
Reply to  Andy P

No insult taken, shipmate!

Andy P
Andy P
5 months ago
Reply to  Crabfat

I left the RAF in 1990 and I found the way they treated people back then was better than the RN treated people when I left in2014. There’s a lot to be said for that.

Crabfat
Crabfat
5 months ago
Reply to  Andy P

Well Andy, my perception of the RN (and it’s only a perception, from the little I’ve seen) is that RN ratings were treated far differently than their equivalents in the RAF. A lot more discipline (necessary on board ships perhaps?). But my impression was of the large gap between officers and ratings. There seemed to be very little, shall we say, ‘informal communication’ between them. RN officers appeared less approachable. Unlike the RAF officers where, to a degree, you could have a laugh and a chat. Ah well…
Could be a lot different nowadays (I left in ’82).

Andy P
Andy P
5 months ago
Reply to  Crabfat

There will be differences between services, I spent most my time on submarines although I did have limited time on ‘big ships’ and ‘small ships’ and the ‘small ship’ approach was more like submarines. The navy just seemed a bit more selfish to me, maybe others will have a different take on it. I doubt I’d have stayed in if I’d spent my career on ‘big ships’.

maurice10
maurice10
5 months ago

Let us hope that a flat Arrows year will save the team some money over and above the standard overheads? I’m sure the individual Red Arrow pilots will stay fresh with training flights etc.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
5 months ago
Reply to  maurice10

Well yes. And they should still deploy to Cyprus for the annual practice camp too.

Mark B
Mark B
5 months ago

I feel they should disband the red arrows until things improve. Potentially there will be gaps as other pilots get ill and recover. It will not do the pilots any harm to plug those gaps as and when necessary

Harold
Harold
5 months ago

Another waste of money which could be better spent actually looking after people. Teir continued existence should not be an encumbrance on the public purse. Nearly £9 million a year of utter waste.