Amid ongoing tensions between Russia and Ukraine, a number of Russian amphibious assault ships have entered the Mediterranean Sea and are believed to be heading to the Black Sea.

Earlier we reported that a number of Ropucha-class landing ships and one Ivan Gren-class landing ship from the Russian Baltic fleet had passed through the English Channel. The amphibious assault flotilla is believed to be heading for the Black Sea.

IMAGE: José María Casanova Colorado, Cartagena from Los Barcos de Eugenio – Eugenio´s Warships, CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

 

 

The vessels have now started to enter the Mediterranean Sea. The below images were captured by David Parody, I recommend you follow him for updates on shipping in and around Gibraltar by clicking here.

The Ropucha-class landing ship can transport 10 main battle tanks and 340 troops or 12 BTRs and 340 troops or 3 main battle tanks, 3 2S9 Nona-S, 5 MT-LBs, 4 army trucks and 313 troops or 500 tons of cargo. The Ivan Gren-class can transport 40 BTRs or IFVs and 300 troops.

George has a degree in Cyber Security from Glasgow Caledonian University and has a keen interest in naval and cyber security matters and has appeared on national radio and television to discuss current events. He also works for the NHS. George is on Twitter at @geoallison
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David Steeper
David Steeper
2 months ago

They look in good nick. Baltic Fleets entire annual paint budget probably went on them. Now where they headed ? My pennyworth Odessa.

SwindonSteve
SwindonSteve
2 months ago
Reply to  David Steeper

Probably right. I reckon if the balloon does go up in Ukraine it might happen within the next fortnight to three weeks.

David Steeper
David Steeper
2 months ago
Reply to  SwindonSteve

When ? That sounds reasonable but I have no idea. Just can’t imagine an ego as fragile as Putins can just back down now.

Rob
Rob
2 months ago
Reply to  SwindonSteve

Putin has got 4 to 5 weeks of frozen ground upon which his tanks can operate. After that the thaw (rasputitsa) sets in on the steppe meaning that all movement off metalled roads becomes impossible.

Roy
Roy
2 months ago
Reply to  Rob

Or maybe not …

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Roy

Exactly so.

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Rob

Your comments are wrong. Even in WW2 Russian tanks operated across swamps, much of their armour can still do so today. To say that they are unable to operate for several months a year is not credible.

Richard
Richard
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

You’re also right, but it’s just not as easy. Tanks can get stuck in mud/swamps if it’s sufficiently deep or churned up. Besides, other ancillary and support vehicles must follow. And getting the lead tank stuck in a mine-cleared drive will cause traffic to stack up…

lee1
lee1
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

It makes things far harder though and also makes it easier for the defenders to bog them down (quite literally) and create ambushes. Yes they could still operate in those conditions but it would be highly desirable not to do so.

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  lee1

Agreed and a definite change in tactics, no doubt well practiced at this time of year, A case of rather not but can if have to, as opposed to can’t.

Peter
Peter
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Vityaz DT30 a very good swamp monster. Capable of handling soft ground with impunity. Russia has many others.

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  David Steeper

Those Baltic Fleet ships are two Ropucha along with the Ivan Gren-class Pyotr Morgunov. The three Northern Fleet Ropucha must be behind them. The Pyotr Morgunov was only accepted into the Fleet at the end of last year so should look in good nick. The others are some of the more valuable assets in the Russian Navy so they tend to look after them.

Their initial destination is probably Tartus, failing that Sevastapol. As things stand at the moment, with what happened in Paris, it is unlikely they will see Odessa.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

I’ve never been clear in my mind at how many vessels there are. Are you saying 6? I’d read in the original reports just 3. What escorts and tugs are with them?

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago

No escorts or tugs, just six landing craft in two groups of three.

dave12
dave12
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Ivan you have a obsession’s with Russian military for a guy who claims hes from Milton Keynes lol as one poster deluded has backed you up , keep trying Ivan lol

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  dave12

Hi Dave, good to see you, I thought you had deserted me.

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

My comment about the ships is the reverse of a WarZone thread so I might be wrong. It does seem that all are now in the Med tho’ but no photos of the group of 3 Ropuchas.
Edit: spelling mistake corrected

Last edited 2 months ago by JohninMK
Tommo
Tommo
2 months ago
Reply to  David Steeper

I wonder if we have an A class in the med which can shadow and silently observe ?

David Steeper
David Steeper
2 months ago
Reply to  Tommo

Possible. Probable USN.

Tommo
Tommo
2 months ago
Reply to  David Steeper

Have they got tanker support ?

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Tommo

None reported, if fully fueled they have a range of about 6,000 miles.

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Tommo

Not worth sub shadowing, the USN has lots of P-8A in the Med for that job.

Tommo
Tommo
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

That’s the only problem with SSNs not many jollies now maybe a Casing BBQ

Farouk
Farouk
2 months ago

Silly question,, and I’m pretty sure there is a very simple answer, but exactly how do huge ships like the above make themselves water tight.

Frank62
Frank62
2 months ago
Reply to  Farouk

Rubber seals around the bow/stern doors I think.

Watcherzero
Watcherzero
2 months ago
Reply to  Frank62

Also the walls between the main hold and hull are watertight compartments to help generate buoyancy.

Farouk
Farouk
2 months ago
Reply to  Watcherzero

Yeah, I went down to the falklands on my second tour in 1983 on the Lancelot and one of the engines broke down during a storm and for some strange reason we had to go into the main hold and I can remember looking at the bulkhead at the front, thinking, if they go, we are brown bread. still haven’t a clue on how they keep the sea out

Last edited 2 months ago by Farouk
Tommo
Tommo
2 months ago
Reply to  Watcherzero

And lots of buckets watcher

Tommo
Tommo
2 months ago
Reply to  Watcherzero

Bulkheads Not Walls any matelot will tell you Walls make Ice cream LOL Watcher

Watcherzero
Watcherzero
2 months ago
Reply to  Tommo

A bulkhead is a wall that runs abeam or longitudinally wholly within a ship, applying it to the outer hull is misuse of the word.

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Farouk

The basic principle is that the doors open outward and are larger than the hole in the hull with, as Frank62 says, really good seals. Then any water or other pressure just forces to doors harder onto the hull seals. Much less of an issue at the stern but the same principle applies. Car ferries have been using these techniques for decades pretty safe apart from operator error like on the Free Enterprise.

dave12
dave12
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Yes the usual tripe to try and go around the nonsense you speak , to deflect the fact that in the west the people their have the freedom to choose their leaders, in Russia they do not have that freedom.

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  dave12

I write a pretty factual post, nothing to do with Russia and you come back at me with that bile. Its you who has a problem not me.

dave12
dave12
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

But can you still answer , do the Russian people still have the freedom to choose their leader ?

Ulya
Ulya
2 months ago
Reply to  dave12

As a expert on all things Russian you should know the answer Dave. Do you know how many political parties there are?, do you know who the second largest party is?

christopher oates
christopher oates
2 months ago
Reply to  Ulya

You guys are funny!

dave12
dave12
2 months ago
Reply to  Ulya

As you should know Ulya being this websites Putin loyal that political parties in Putin’s Russia means jack Sh#t and so does your vote and Quite publicly Putin is self anointed into the 2030’s lol

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  dave12

I do not see it as my role to educate you on the current Russian political system. So, please Dave do some homework yourself rather than pathetically spouting ‘past its sell by date’ propaganda. Anyway, what’s it got to do with my comment of this thread?

dave12
dave12
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

You really are a couple of sails short of the wind, lol

Boo
Boo
2 months ago
Reply to  dave12

Wake up folks, Democracy is the illusion of choice. What Tory made laws have Labour rescinded, and vis versa. In the West we get to choose which ‘establishment picked’ party/leader erodes our freedoms, while serving the interests of the elites.

As Mark Twain said, ‘If voting made any difference, it wouldn’t be allowed.’

Tommo
Tommo
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Herald of Free Enterprise TT sad story the CDs of the Hunts had too search her cleared the DFs of perfume and Aftershave smell was that bad

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Tommo

Very, have a friend who worked for Sealink at the time and was in Dover at the time, very traumatic. Many of my partner’s friends, she came from Deal, were on that ship.

Last edited 2 months ago by JohninMK
Tommo
Tommo
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

My First LT Paddy got the Queens Medal for the task of recovery didn’t talk about it Johnin ,I can guess why

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Tommo

Something you want to drive to the depths of your mind asap.

Tommo
Tommo
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

The little man in your Sub conscious puts those memories in his Filing cabinet but doesn’t lock it and without warning the cabinet flings open and spills those memories out That’s a Layman’s version of a case for PTSD Johnin

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Tommo

I regard myself as really lucky not to have been there. My late father in law was Norwegian and whilst he flew Catalinas out of Woodhaven on the south side of the river from Dundee they were station at Leuchars with their Mosquito colleagues. Whilst he had a pretty boring time they didn’t and even though its once removed I can’t get some of the horrors in the sights he saw out of my head. It helped him to talk about it but my grandfather, who won a MM in WW1 never did.

Tommo
Tommo
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Thanks Johnin seems like our Grandfather’s were from a generation who’s stoic reserve was that of the Stiff upper Lip at the time of the Great War it was all Hoorah and flag waving 4 years and 800,000 dead later returning men didn’t talk about what they’d seen and done they were not hungry for making a quick quid with stories for sale The only men who spoke would only speak too those that had been there that’s one reason why the British legion was such a pressure relief valve

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Tommo

We have one in Newport Pagnell, proudly on the wall is a VC where the winner got a wounded General out of gunfire at the time of the Light Brigade. Bloody Russians, never forgiven them since!

Tommo
Tommo
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

VCs made of Bronze from a captured Russian Cannon can’t be much left of it now 170yrs worth of Valour I suppose we could ask Vlad for another one hee hee

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Tommo

Hope we never put one of our military in the position they might earn one again.