The Ranger Regiment is a major part of the British Army’s new global posture and was established as part of Future Soldier, the biggest transformation of the British Army in over 20 years… but what is it for?

It is understood that as part of the newly established Army Special Operations Brigade it will be routinely deployed alongside partner forces around the world to counter Violent Extremist Organisations and hostile state threats.

With regards to the new Ranger Regiment, the British Army says the following:

“The Army’s Special Operations Brigade will complement the work of special operations troops across in the Armed Forces and those of our allies. The Ranger Regiment will be capable of operating discreetly in complex, high-threat environments, deterring adversaries and contributing to collective deterrence by training, advising and – if necessary – accompanying partners in support of our national interests.

The Rangers draw their name from an elite unit that fought in the British Army in the 18th Century in North America, using irregular tactics. The British Army shares this heritage with US Special Operations Forces, whose 75th Ranger Regiment traces its lineage back to the same grouping. In addition, our Ranger Regiment draws on the proud tradition of British Army units and formations honed for unconventional operations such as the Special Service Brigades, the Raiding Support Regiment, V-Force, the Chindits and T-Force during World War Two.”

Speaking to the House of Commons, Defence Secretary Ben Wallace said:

“On the Rangers, we envisage that a large proportion of their time will not necessarily be spent with NATO allies. They may be in Africa, the middle east or further afield. We have already started spending the money to equip them to be, if necessary, more independent. The reason that they are partly special is that they will often have to deploy without the usual huge amount of logistical support that a normal conventional unit gets, so they will have to be effectively a more selected cadre of people with better equipment to be able to be more independent and more 360 in their integration.

They may well be alongside an African country with a lesser communications capability. Part of what we are trying to do is to help those countries by sometimes being their enabler and giving them support in signals, helicopters, or intelligence and surveillance so that they can understand what is coming, and I think the Rangers will be able to do that. In anticipation of NATO’s requirements, we will be plugged into the NATO special operations forces to make sure that we are aligned where we can be.”

The Regiment, initially announced earlier this year, will stand-up on 1 December 2021, commencing cadres and training for its four battalions.

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Rob
Rob
8 days ago

Rangers are a good idea. Forward based, partnered with local forces, the aim is to snuff out trouble before it takes hold. I still don’t understand why they just don’t call them Army Commandos; that way we don’t need to create ANOTHER infantry Regiment in a small Army. I also think the new cap badge is a bit Action Man but overall it’s a good move. One problem I do see is that in such a small Army having yet another elite formation will mean that the recruiting base for exceptional soldiers, even if we are expanding elite roles, gets… Read more »

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
7 days ago
Reply to  Rob

Commandos as a title suggest raiding forces in littoral areas. These Rangers won’t be doing that.
But I do agree that there is a difficulty in having too many elite forces. There is a related problem in having a lot of highly specialised forces (therefore not too many general purpose forces) in a small army.

Rob
Rob
7 days ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

The term Commando comes from the Boer war where small groups of Boers were teamed into a group called a Commando (Dutch word for command group). They operated independently on the high velt miles away from the sea. I think the term fits exactly with the concept of operations these Rangers will undertake.

James Fennell
James Fennell
7 days ago
Reply to  Rob

Different CONOPS. They will not deploy as formed units, but in small teams of a a few dozen – like the advisers sent to Oman.

Airborne
Airborne
8 days ago

“Partly special” WTF is that? More spin in order to keep the Infantry capbadge mafia happy. Yes they may get some extra funding but I guarantee they will not be independent in any shape or form, and all these extra “assets” will just be ripped out of your normal Regiments to back fill as the task/org requires. Concept is good but let’s say it a it is, just a bunch of reduced manned Battalions to keep the cap badges alive!

Challenger
Challenger
7 days ago
Reply to  Airborne

Absolutely. The logical end point to this nonsense will be to end up with dozens of so called elite 200-300 man battalions with vague notions of providing training, reconnaissance and partnering with local forces upstream of the threats…..but with no actual Army that could take on anything like a pier adversary left because it’s been completely gutted.

Fine if you effectively want a purely peacekeeping and advisory force. Not so good if you want anything remotely impressive and useful to offer up to NATO to contribute to high-end warfare!

Airborne
Airborne
7 days ago
Reply to  Challenger

Spot on 👍

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
7 days ago
Reply to  Challenger

“The logical end point to this nonsense will be to end up with dozens of so called elite 200-300 man battalions with vague notions of providing training, reconnaissance and partnering with local forces upstream of the threats…..but with no actual Army that could take on anything like a pier adversary left because it’s been completely gutted.” In one, no meat on the bone left to cut and solely reliant on other nations if we ever do need to defend ourselves against a peer adversary. You would have to be blind not to see what’s coming next. China, Russia approve 2021–25… Read more »

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
7 days ago
Reply to  Challenger

You have a good point. The army will become too fragmented and too specialised and will only be able to do niche operations at small to medium scale – and for a short period of time.
We have moved a very long way from the 5 identical (versatile) multirole brigades (MRBs) under FAS (Next Steps) which ran up to mid-2012.

Tomartyr
Tomartyr
7 days ago
Reply to  Challenger

I don’t think there’s any real intent for the Army to contribute to NATO anymore, it seems that’s left to the Navy and Airforce.
And in fairness it would take years of rebuilding for that to change anyway. This seems like a good way of wringing some use out of otherwise useless numbers.

Stuart Crawford
Stuart Crawford
8 days ago

The more “elite” regiments you create, the less elite they become.

Airborne
Airborne
7 days ago

Correct! And who are the training teams to ensure they are elite? In house? Brecon? All getting a bit RAF Reg for me!

Jason M Holmes
Jason M Holmes
7 days ago
Reply to  Airborne

RAF Reg are the most over trained troops we have and not used at all to their ability

Airborne
Airborne
7 days ago
Reply to  Jason M Holmes

Have to massively disagree with that, they are quite narcissistic and believe their own press!

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
7 days ago
Reply to  Jason M Holmes

Do say more. How is the RAF Regt over trained? Their utilty as airfield defenders has reduced – they don’t do LLAD anymore – they gave their Rapier FUs to the Royal Artillery years ago.

Airborne
Airborne
7 days ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Correct never has an organisation believed they so good yet have no combat history to prove it! My son in law has done over 20 years in the RAF Reg (he is now allowed in my house so I’ve softened a lot with age lol) and he knows the score with their nonsense. But, FFS keep them in the ORBAT as real soldiers may get dicked to stag on bases/RAF based if they get binned!!!!!

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
7 days ago
Reply to  Airborne

They do at least provide a det for SFSG!

Airborne
Airborne
6 days ago

Yes mate a few JTACs, CBRN det and a few lads in a rifle company! But mostly as an organisation are full of self importance and not effective in most roles (and that’s from my son in law) 😂! They will be for the chop if the RAF need to lose PIDs mate believe me.

AG
AG
7 days ago
Reply to  Jason M Holmes

I personally think this could have been a role for the RAF Regt or a number of current Army units on rotation who already do this. Why create a ‘partly special’ unit. SFSG has worked imo so let’s not dilute our elite forces.

simon
simon
7 days ago
Reply to  Airborne

Germans found this in WW1,creating stormtrooper units due out the best from other infantry units which weaken them overall. When they broke through there was no back up from other units

Airborne
Airborne
7 days ago
Reply to  simon

And there’s the issue mate, correct 👍

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
7 days ago
Reply to  simon

I believe the Waffen SS took the best men. And it was the Waffen SS always on the scene as fire brigade to stem the breach or lead assaults.

Airborne
Airborne
7 days ago

Correct mate even later on in the war when it was conscription for the Waffen SS they still got all the hardest and most reactive tasks to stabilise fronts or extract lesser motivated forces!

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
7 days ago
Reply to  Airborne

I’d suggest 2nd SS Panzer Korps around Kharkov offensive early 43 and of course the Roman army two of the most effective fighting forces ever seen.

Well off topic now.

Airborne
Airborne
6 days ago

Well off topic but very interesting subject, Kharkov and later tank battles are a subject I find most interesting.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
6 days ago
Reply to  Airborne

Likewise. The Eastern Front is my other main area of interest after our military.

Rfn_Weston
Rfn_Weston
7 days ago
Reply to  Airborne

Bunch of Crowbots.

Airborne
Airborne
7 days ago
Reply to  Rfn_Weston

😂👍!

Para Regt retd
Para Regt retd
6 days ago
Reply to  Airborne

Well put. Will ALL personnel attend selection or just the toms and JNCOs with the head shed having divine right

Airborne
Airborne
1 day ago
Reply to  Para Regt retd

Good question, and what sort of selection will it be? Probably quite naff TBH, as the Rangers will not be fighting anyone no matter what chuff the spin says to justify this rather poor idea. They may mentor, train and work with other developing countries militaries but as for kinetic ops, no chance.

farouk
farouk
7 days ago

Hollywood has a lot to answer for. It seems that after watching loads of vids where a single SF guy (or of late female) can drop into darkest Africa, armed with a paperclip, a roll of harry black maskers and a vegan ration pack can take out an entire army of ak47 carrying thugs, rescue the girl and be back before the 10pm news. As others have pointed out, when you reduce your recruiting pool, you reduce the calibre of people. Just glad I’m a big fat hairy civy.

the_marquis
the_marquis
4 days ago
Reply to  farouk

And the sad reality is, when US SOF units have dropped into “darkest Africa” as you say, they got ripped to shreds by the locals cos they were lightly equipped without the proper supporting arms, c.f. the Tongo Tongo ambush in Niger in 2017, and the infamous battle of Mogahdishu, which coincidentally involved a large Ranger force, and in true Hollywood tradition, was later turned into a major US military victory by Jerry Bruckheimer

Jason Surrage
Jason Surrage
7 days ago

Great idea, although I’m not sure why the “special” units currently in existence can’t be built on and used to do this job. We have the SAS, SBS, SRR, SFSG (as well as a more “commando” focused Royal Marines Commando force) already that if expanded and resourced sufficiently could surely do this job on top of all they already do. The SAS, SRR and SFSG already recruit predominantly from an ever decreasing infantry force within the regular Army and this is obviously going to put more pressure on an already under pressure part of the army. Not a great title… Read more »

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
6 days ago
Reply to  Jason Surrage

“I’m not sure why the “special” units currently in existence can’t be built on and used to do this job. We have the SAS, SBS, SRR, SFSG” Morning. Having units like “Rangers”, the SFAB, S OPs Bde and the FCF enables those true Tier 1 units to get on and do their stuff on more important operations that let them use their unique skills. SFSG was originally created to do exactly that, despite rumours of favouritism from General Mike Jackson. The SFSG themselves have seen an expansion in tasks. They are also not a Tier 1 SF unit like the… Read more »

Barry Larking
Barry Larking
7 days ago

The Royal Irish Rangers? You remember, even if Whitehall’s tactful memory lapse doesn’t. England, then the United Kingdom has fought no major war without allies (including Empire forces) abroad since William and Mary. Before that you have to go further back to the time of bows and arrows. We are too small a nation to fight such a war, though luckily, we have had some wonderful Jack Tars to level up the odds at sea. Almost by accident we have discovered a different way to fight, taught to us by our opponents and allies. We learned a few cunning plans.… Read more »

Last edited 7 days ago by Barry Larking
Tomartyr
Tomartyr
7 days ago
Reply to  Barry Larking

So I’m guessing the Falklands doesn’t count because it wasn’t a major war, and it wasn’t a major war because it didn’t involve two or more coalitions of allies fighting eachother? How nice neat and circular.

Steven Alfred Rake
Steven Alfred Rake
7 days ago

I just wonder why we are reinventing the wheel, give 42Cdo its support company back free up 1 Para from SF duties and you have the core of a Ranger force right there, the old red and green kick arse machine. Also when you think of all the old cap badges we have lost including the Irish Rangers the pessimist in me is saying this is just more political BS for the media to say they are making the Army bigger and more effective.

farouk
farouk
7 days ago

Steven wrote:
“”the pessimist in me is saying this is just more political BS for the media to say they are making the Army bigger and more effective.””

Oh how we all laughed at the carry on up the Kyber film and the Devils in skirts, now it reads as dev and bill in a skirt

Steven Alfred Rake
Steven Alfred Rake
7 days ago
Reply to  farouk

Been on the night nurse have we!!

Klonkie
Klonkie
7 days ago
Reply to  farouk

ay yes- the 3rd Foot and Mouth Regiment

Klonkie
Klonkie
7 days ago

It’s a good point you raise Steven. I thought this was the role for Para and Commando units?

Steven Alfred Rake
Steven Alfred Rake
7 days ago
Reply to  Klonkie

The Paras are down to just 2 units as 1 Para is permanently assigned to SF protection something the Spearhead battalion could do, 47Cdo was stood up a couple of years ago for fleet protection but it was 42Cdo that lost its support company and has now become the fleet protection specialists so now there is just 2 Cdo units. Both the Para and the Marines specialise in out of area operations and so by bringing 1 Para and 42 Cdo together you would not be reinventing the wheel and ripping the hart out of other regiments who will lose… Read more »

Klonkie
Klonkie
7 days ago

Than you Steven – worrying points that you have raised.
How right you are in your concluding sentence.

Airborne
Airborne
7 days ago

In regard to 1 Para they do a lot more than SF protection! Teams take on many tier 2/1 type tasks without SF teams involved, or form part of the actual assault teams etc. Their role is vast and has increased certainty over the last 10 years. I agree with your overall thought process however but the Rangers are more akin to the old BATTs but with a lot more government spin!

Steven Alfred Rake
Steven Alfred Rake
5 days ago
Reply to  Airborne

Sorry for the delay in getting back to you I have been out and about for a couple of days, I know 1 Para are well integrated into the SF and it would have been a non starter as the dirty deal has already been signed, I just do not understand the thinking behind what the MoD are trying to prove, we have the Riffles who would have been ideal for this as well but seem to be being pushed to the side line ready to be axed quietly when no one is watching. The MoD keep blowing their trumpet… Read more »

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
7 days ago
Reply to  Klonkie

Paras and Commandos (highly agressive warfighting troops are classically inserted in a novel/specialised way). They have a completely different role to the new Rangers who are “capable of operating discreetly in complex, high-threat environments, deterring adversaries and contributing to collective deterrence by training, advising and – if necessary – accompanying partners in support of our national interests”.

Klonkie
Klonkie
7 days ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Thanks for the clarification point Graham , appreciate that

Airborne
Airborne
7 days ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Agreed and see my answer to Steven above

James Fennell
James Fennell
7 days ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Yes they will not deploy as battalions – rather as small advisory teams of a few dozen.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
7 days ago

The regimental badge is already coming In for a bashing. It looks like that of an “Apartheid” unit apparently?

Though I recall that the same happened with the badge of the SFSG. It looked to Waffen SS for some! 😆

Whatever. To work the S Ops Bde needs enablers of its own. None if which yet exist.

I, like Rob, don’t see why they just designate individual battalions “commando ” within existing regiments.

I guess that doesn’t give enough spin or headlines while the army’s kinetic ability is further reduced.

Rob
Rob
7 days ago

Daniele. Maj problems with this new review: Artillery (or Fires – a horrible Americanism). We still don’t know what replaces the 105mm light gun, what SP wheeled 155mm we are getting or the numbers including enhanced GMLRS. A stand off Army surely needs plenty of artillery. Air Defence. Yes we have the new Land Ceptor but so few. How will these light forces based over seas defend themselves? Why, if the Brigade Combat Teams are meant to be all arms self supporting units, are the logistics, Signals and Engineering forces organised separately? Oh and then there is the omnishambles of… Read more »

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
7 days ago
Reply to  Rob

Snap mate. The enablers have remained separate. Sceptically? It makes 3 Div look bigger when a layman looks at a website with the orbat.
Look at 6 Div. It has a S Ops Bde and 77 Bde in it. Neither are full brigades. Divisions in name Only.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
7 days ago
Reply to  Rob

Rob, the article is about the Ranger Regt. Are you suggesting they need huge arty sp? They exist to: be capable of operating discreetly in complex, high-threat environments, deterring adversaries and contributing to collective deterrence by training, advising and – if necessary – accompanying partners in support of our national interests.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
7 days ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

To do that should they not require?

Their own AAC element.

Their own Logistic tail – RLC Regiment, REME Bn, RAMC unit.

Artillery – not necessarily a regiment of guns, but how about a regiment of agile vehicles with Brimstone or Spike NLOS?

Signals Reg for EW/SIGINT.

None of which exist. Or if they do they are pulled from other areas. They could exist, if the army distributed the headcount it has better, but that would mean upsetting the Cap Badge Mafia.

I read that the reg will be spread from the Middle East to Africa.

Airborne
Airborne
7 days ago

Mate they are going to be a little like the old BATTs but with more spin and possible kinetic capability (but not much). As I’ve said mate any other assets they need will be ripped from other big standard units to cobble together for whatever op they are deployed on.

Airborne
Airborne
7 days ago
Reply to  Airborne

Big should say bog

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
7 days ago
Reply to  Airborne

BATTs, which in recent years were the “Specialised Infantry Group” of up to 5 battalions, which were halved in size and called “new” by the MoD.

Which are now morphing into the Security Force Assistance Battalions. Which by my understanding do much the same thing, train and advise while letting proxies do the bulk of the fighting.

SF from a non CRW or deployed sqn were also used for that, and made good money for HMG.

They should keep the Reapers and assign them directly to S Ops Bde for starters.

Airborne
Airborne
7 days ago

You know that the Ranger units and the SFA units will all end up doing pretty much the same thing mate.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
7 days ago
Reply to  Airborne

This is the issue, yes. Which makes me think it’s at heart a cuts exercise “getting rid” of battalions from an all arms brigade format as the enablers from the CS and CSS arms don’t exist for them.

If the enablers were found for it fine, as I understand the rationale behind the Grey zone jargon.

Rob
Rob
7 days ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

In short, YES. If you deploy a light force forward they need to be backed up with something. For the new Ranger Regiment that means good local air defence, secure logistics and long ranged fires. If we are moving to a stand off strategy, and we are, then you need stand off weapons.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
7 days ago
Reply to  Rob

Just read of the 1st enhancement to S Ops Bde.

The HAC Patrols Sqn will provide Sp OP patrols to the Bde.

They already do this in support of 4/73.

RobW
RobW
7 days ago
Reply to  Rob

The upgrade to GMLRS is the one known quantity in all this. All 44 launchers are being upgraded by 2025 and will be able to fire the US Precision Strike Missile. The first batch will be sent in March 2022.

Upgrades to Multiple Launch Rocket Systems Strengthen Deep Fires Capability | The British Army (mod.uk)

Airborne
Airborne
7 days ago

People have said it’s like the Rhodesian Selious scouts? If that’s the case then what’s the issue, the scouts were absolutely the best at what they did mate. Very interesting combat history for those lads.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
7 days ago
Reply to  Airborne

Are they C Sqn Rhodesian SAS? Or am I getting mixed up?
I read somewhere 22 tried to retain some lineage with them.

geoff
geoff
7 days ago

Hi Daniele/Airborne. I have a friend who is an ex Selous Scout-a mild mannered and genuinely devout Christian who just had his church with a largely Black congregation, looted and badly damaged in the July unrest. They were a unit much in the mould of many specialised units the world over. If they were a Death squad then basically not much different from soldiers the world over-that is their trade. The men they were opposing used similar tactics-downing civilian aircraft for example in the shooting down of Viscounts and in one case butchering the survivors including women and children. No… Read more »

Last edited 7 days ago by geoff
Airborne
Airborne
7 days ago
Reply to  geoff

Mate they were tough professionals in their trade, the same as many other previous and current units and operators. You fight the wars that you are sent to and on occasion have to fight the way the opposition does, otherwise you will not have the impact required. Cheers mate.

Airborne
Airborne
7 days ago

The scouts were initially recruited from C Sqn in the 60s although my knowledge on the subject is sadly limited, as my time was with 44 Bde when I was in SA. Although the Scouts and Rhodesia were still a popular subject for the blokes to chat about.

geoff
geoff
6 days ago
Reply to  Airborne

Howsit Airborne. Have you seen the video of colourised pics from the Boer War? Having spent time in Bloemfontein you would I am sure, appreciate this
Cheers
Geoff

http://youtu.be/thz3DQQNjTwr

Airborne
Airborne
6 days ago
Reply to  geoff

Hi Geoff damn great pictures, once in colour it really does bring the conflict to life! The faces are so clear and dare I say hard as nails!!!!

geoff
geoff
6 days ago
Reply to  Airborne

Hard as nails indeed Airborne and a damn pity we had to fight them.

James Fennell
James Fennell
7 days ago

Very similar to the Selous Scouts capbadge – this Rhodesian Army’s premier counter-insurgency unit. Formed from C Squadron 22 SAS (22 SAS had been called the Malayan Scouts and was formed by Mike Calvert (former Chindit and WW2 SAS commander) from the territorial 21 SAS (Artists Rifles) and a contingent of Rhodesian volunteers (with experience with Z Force in Burma in WW2, fighting alongside the hill tribes) for the Malayan emergency. After three years C Squadron went back to Rhodesia and was replaced by an ANZAC squadron (which later became the Aus and NZ SAS). After UDI in 1965, C… Read more »

Last edited 7 days ago by James Fennell
Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
7 days ago
Reply to  James Fennell

Thanks for that detailed overview James.

Joe Jarvie
Joe Jarvie
7 days ago

Does this mean that with so many elite units, the Queen will be guarded by the SAS at Buckingham Palace? Will we have enough “ordinary” troops to do any war fighting?

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
7 days ago
Reply to  Joe Jarvie

Your irony is acute! The Queen is guarded by Protection Command of the Metropolitan Police, as I am sure you know. But I do agree that with too many specialised units there will be less ‘core’ units for conventional warfighting.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
7 days ago
Reply to  Joe Jarvie

 “Queen will be guarded by the SAS at Buckingham Palace? “ No. Public duties are unchanged and are split between LDist and 4LBCT. We have Infantry but many of the battalions have been reduced. What the army lacks is the CS and CSS formations to organise them into effective all arms formations. Which is what these BCT are supposed to be about. Tier 1 SF are from UKSFG, assisted by the SFSG, which are Tier 2. The Ranger Regiment acts much as the FCF will do. In the Grey Zone, where most of the operations currently are. “Under the threshold” as… Read more »

Jacko
Jacko
7 days ago

So what will they be able to do that an ordinary infantry battalion couldn’t do with a bit of extra training?
Where is the crown on the badge?

Rob
Rob
7 days ago
Reply to  Jacko

Jacko,’where is the crown on the badge?’ Absolutely.That’s why I said above it looks a bit Action Man. Even if they aren’t a ‘Royal Regiment’ (yet?) they need some British heraldry somewhere.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
7 days ago
Reply to  Rob

SRR does not have any heraldry in it.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
7 days ago
Reply to  Jacko

The Ranger Regiment is a brand new regiment and does not have Royal in its title – such an honour can take 50 or more years to earn – hence no crown in the badge.

Paul.P
Paul.P
7 days ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Roundheads?

geoff
geoff
7 days ago
Reply to  Paul.P

Haha Paul-when SA became a Republic in 1961 many of the “English” Army regiments lost their Royal titles. The (Royal) Durban light infantry had to say goodbye to the’R’ but hung on to the Crown by referring to it as a heraldic device-a rose by any other name! For many years thereafter they toasted the Queen on her birthday in the Officers Mess

Paul.P
Paul.P
7 days ago
Reply to  geoff

No problem. I think the professional Roundheads beat those effete amateur Cavaliers 🙂

James Fennell
James Fennell
7 days ago
Reply to  Jacko

They will not be deployed as battalions – they provide a cadre of ‘advisers’ who can lead and mentor groups of local forces. The Russians do this with their Wagner Group, the Americans Green Berets. We have used SAS and SBS to do this in the past, but there are nowhere near enough to go around, and its a waste of their skills. They will be deployed in small teams of probably no more than 10 to 15, expected to operate independently from thier battalion HQ, embedded in local forces. They will be deployed in regions semi-permanently, so build up… Read more »

Last edited 7 days ago by James Fennell
Tommo
Tommo
7 days ago

Envisaging, the future Army being leaner ie regular force 70.000 with 30.000 reservists Creating another Batt/ Regiment of Rangers from a shrinking Pool .Would this mean that Other Regiments such as 1 of the Rifles would disappear as for the New Cap Badge its already ruffling feather for its similarities too the old South African Apartied Death squad

geoff
geoff
7 days ago
Reply to  Tommo

Hi Tommo. just a comment-the unit was not South African but was the Rhodesian Selous Scouts. It was named after the early pioneer Frederick Selous, a fine soldier and multi talented naturalist. Apartheid was never official policy in Rhodesia and the cap badge featuring a raptor-eagle or similar bird of prey is used all over the world in Military insignia. In short this Daily Mail article is a pile of Horseshit!!!

Tommo
Tommo
7 days ago
Reply to  geoff

O bugger , looks like I’m going too have to cancel my Daily Mail subs thanks Geoff, Rhodesia, can I say that name without upsetting wakey Wokies

geoff
geoff
7 days ago
Reply to  Tommo

Hi Tommo. At the risk of provoking further Wokie anger I could say that I only read it for the Tits and Ass 😄. It is however an enjoyable read full of appalling grammar and syntax and lots of really shoddy journalism!!

Tommo
Tommo
7 days ago
Reply to  geoff

Should I dare say that English Grammar in Schools is now being taught as a Second Language 🤔 Innt.

geoff
geoff
7 days ago
Reply to  Tommo

😄

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
7 days ago
Reply to  geoff

Morning my friend.

We get the DM, but are increasingly wondering why! I’d never use any newspaper for defence related stuff.

geoff
geoff
6 days ago

Hello Daniele. Hope you and your family are well. On the subject of Rhodesia and mention elsewhere of the English Civil War,many forget that the Rhodesian conflict on the ground and politically had elements of Civil War about it. Much of the settler population was British born or the sons and daughters of British parents including Ian Smith, much of his cabinet, his Police commissioner,the first President and many of the military men-top brass and enlisted men. My late father in law was ex RAF and flew as a spotter pilot for the RhAf. Much of the Army had strong… Read more »

Last edited 6 days ago by geoff
Richard Kehoe
Richard Kehoe
7 days ago

I have been on regular army reserve of officers for many years now and would rejoin immediately if asked

Tams
Tams
7 days ago

Some of the pictures trying to sell this new force are shameful. Shoddy uniforms and terrible postures.

geoff
geoff
7 days ago

On the subject of the Rangers and the history of names how about the Commandos (Kommandos) inspired by the horsemen and other irregulars of the Boers that fought Britannia, have a look at these men of steel…

https://youtu.be/thz3DQQNjTwr

dave12
dave12
7 days ago

Remarketing of a force so small it cannot do its main task which is take and hold ground.

Joe16
Joe16
7 days ago

There’s a lot of mixed up descriptions in the news about the Ranger Regiment, which is frustrating me in understanding what the intention is with them (maybe that’s the point?). They’re supposed to be SF and provide support and training in the “grey zone” to allies and stuff like that. Which is sort of like the US Army Green Berets (which I’ve heard them referred to), except that those guys are very much top tier SF and specialise in all kinds of other stuff too. But they’ve also referenced the US 75th Ranger Regiment, which is an entirely different outfit… Read more »

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
7 days ago
Reply to  Joe16

Because we have so many infantry battalions and so few CS and CSS to pair them with, creating proper all arms formations.

So get rid of 4 with Rangers, another 4 with SFAB, and reduce them to 250, 300 men while we’re at it.

Yes SGSG exist.

I don’t describe Green Berets as teir 1 though.

Angus
Angus
7 days ago

Sad Future for once a proud force, all little bits that just do not work together with no real weight of fight. The Top Brass have to take their share of blame for ripping the heart out of what once was the best in the World. With regards to Scots serving, it provided way more than it’s share of the fight in the past, that’s how we had an Empire and kicked ass. Sorry to say the WOKE Brigade have gotten in and you can’t even call your mate ‘MATE’ in case it upsets someone. God help us all if… Read more »

John doe
John doe
7 days ago

As a Ex Special Forces lad I think this is absolutely ridiculous we are taking off Paul to give to Peter if you see what I mean but this is just the NON MILITARY HELMETS trying to be clever..

John Hartley
John Hartley
7 days ago

I can’t help but think that all those M1117, the Americans left in Afghanistan, would have been ideal for this UK Ranger unit.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
5 days ago
Reply to  John Hartley

Most of the time they will be training and advising foreign armies – if it all turns to warfighting, won’t it all have gone horribly wrong?

John Hartley
John Hartley
5 days ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

The reports say the Rangers are expected to fight alongside the friendly armies that they train. I am too old to be a Ranger, but if I was, I would rather be in an armoured, ied proof M1117, than an open land rover.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
23 hours ago
Reply to  John Hartley

It sounds as if they are too lightly equipped to be credible as warfighters. Why be sucked into some other country’s war, particulalary one where there are no ‘British interests’?
What if that war goes badly – would we reinforce the Ranger unit from the UK – or pull it out with some embarrassment? Who has actually thought this through?

John Hartley
John Hartley
7 minutes ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Think things through? Have you looked at our officials & politicians lately? They think it more important to virtue signal than to deal with the real world.

DanielMorgan
DanielMorgan
6 days ago

Whereof the British insistence on designating what are really battalion size units as regiments? Although technically correct, it gives off a false impression and certainly does not deceive a potential adversary.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
5 days ago
Reply to  DanielMorgan

There are 4 Ranger battalions in the Ranger Regiment.

Dan
Dan
5 days ago

So they are somewhere between the Royal Marines and sas?

John Richardson
John Richardson
4 days ago

Amateurs creating a Fred Carno’s Army. Absolutely mad idea in my opinion.

Cripes
Cripes
4 days ago

While it is possible to paint an alluring picture of all the things these Rangers will be able to do, the concept is basically flawed. As I understand it, when an infantry bn is given a training and mentoring role, it keeps the 250+ officers, WOs and NCOs, who will organise and lead the training/mentoring – but loses nearly all its 300 squaddies, who are distributed between the other battalions in their infantry admin Division. It means the battalion ceases to exist as a combat unit and becomes the equivalent of the old British Army Training team (BATT). It will… Read more »

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
23 hours ago
Reply to  Cripes

You have spotted this politician’s trick. It is Defence Diplomacy – worthwhile (conceptually) but not to the extent of losing so much of your (now) scarce Infantry frittered away across the globe.