Admiral Sir Tony Radakin, Chief of the Defence Staff, has spoken on the staggering impact of the ongoing conflict in Ukraine on Russia, noting that 500,000 Russian soldiers have been killed or wounded since the war began.

Speaking on the significance of the UK’s contributions, Admiral Radakin stated, “The recent milestone of 500,000 Russians killed or wounded is a reminder of how badly this war has gone for Russia. Over the past year, with British help, Ukraine has driven the Russian fleet from Crimea and reopened the Black Sea for exports.”

Radakin also spoke of the strategic victories Ukraine has achieved with assistance from the UK and other allies. These victories include not only the reopening of critical maritime routes but also significant territorial gains.

“The battle on land is much tougher, but Ukraine’s future as a sovereign nation is not in doubt,” Radakin continued. “A free and democratic Ukraine, full of promise and hope, stands in jarring contrast to Russia’s trajectory of contraction and decline, and an increasingly authoritarian future under Putin.”

This perspective was echoed by Defence Secretary John Healey during his visit to Odesa. Healey reaffirmed the UK’s steadfast support for Ukraine and announced a new package of military aid, including artillery guns, ammunition, and precision missiles.

“Our commitment to stand with the Ukrainian people is absolute, as is our resolve to confront Russian aggression and pursue Putin for his war crimes,” Healey stated.

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Lisa has a degree in Media & Communication from Glasgow Caledonian University and works with industry news, sifting through press releases in addition to moderating website comments.
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BobA
BobA (@guest_833025)
11 days ago

To put this into context, British forces (including overseas crown territories) lost 383,700 casualties in WW2

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli (@guest_833042)
11 days ago
Reply to  BobA

Yes, staggering to compare our loss over the entire period of WW2.
But Russia lost over 20 million! So they see things differently as far as casualties go I think.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli (@guest_833043)
11 days ago

Though thinking of it, that 20 million is civilians as well.

Last edited 11 days ago by Daniele Mandelli
Dern
Dern (@guest_833083)
11 days ago

*Soviets. Not Russians.
That figure includes Estonians, Lithuanians, Latvians, Ukranians, Kazakhs, Georgians etc.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli (@guest_833090)
11 days ago
Reply to  Dern

Yes, fair comment, I use Russia interchangeably, which is of course not accurate. Soviets.

Andy reeves
Andy reeves (@guest_833110)
11 days ago

and the invisible casualties, scarred by it .

Barry Larking
Barry Larking (@guest_833149)
11 days ago

It is also a complete guess. Stalin eliminated so many of ‘the undesirable classes’ pre-war demographers struggle to create an accurate figure for that entire era. Certainly the last Red Army push in late summer 1944 into 1945 cost an immense number of casualties at the front.

Steve R
Steve R (@guest_833653)
9 days ago

27 million total, I’ve read, including 12 million military dead.

Insane numbers. But, I suppose, Russia is an insane country.

Jim
Jim (@guest_833063)
11 days ago

The actual figure for dead for the Russian’s in Ukraine is only 50,000. No one seems clear on how many of those 450,000 wounded are unable to fight again. But as you say when you’re dealing with animals like the Russians 50,000 dead won’t change their mind.

Given its an all out mechanised war the death toll is remarkably small on both sides but then the vast majority of deaths in World War II were civilians and a result of starvation.

I think the Orcs will run out of tanks long before they run out of bodies.

Jacko
Jacko (@guest_833065)
11 days ago
Reply to  Jim

Where do you get the 50,000 figure from RT? All official estimates are up in the half a million region!

Jim
Jim (@guest_833086)
11 days ago
Reply to  Jacko

No the half a million figure is killed and wounded it literally says it in the article above.

BBC estimates 50,000 Russian dead as of April based on independent research.

Last edited 11 days ago by Jim
Wasp snorter
Wasp snorter (@guest_833105)
11 days ago
Reply to  Jim

The tracing team at the BBC who scour social media and grave sites confirm that, but that’s only the verified and the BBC state a lot more is likely to be dead.. Bear in mind there are many mercenary and prisoners who go unaccounted for, and as WW2, ‘missing in action’ was not assumed as dead for many years. If you have been burnt to ashes in a tank, there is no body and no official death sometimes, just forever ‘missing’, my personal guess is around 150k dead.

Last edited 11 days ago by Wasp snorter
Andy reeves
Andy reeves (@guest_833112)
11 days ago
Reply to  Jim

the BBC has become an embarrassment it should not be paid for by us

Simon
Simon (@guest_833155)
11 days ago
Reply to  Jim

They said that Russia’s military death toll in Ukraine has now passed the 50,000 mark. And that was by looking at grave yards and social media. they then said that ” The actual number of Russian deaths is likely to be much higher.” which is to be expected.

Ian Skinner
Ian Skinner (@guest_833841)
9 days ago
Reply to  Jim

The Casualties since May have been horrendous, Ukrainian intelligence estimates that 91% of the troops committed to the Kharkiv offensive have been killed, wounded or captured since May: The Ukrainians call it “The Meat Offensive”.

AlexS
AlexS (@guest_833089)
11 days ago
Reply to  Jacko

Half a million are causalities not only deaths.
It is even possible that a soldier hurt twice are double counted.

Last edited 11 days ago by AlexS
Graham Moore
Graham Moore (@guest_833099)
11 days ago
Reply to  Jacko

Casuaties = KIA+DOW+WIA+missing.

Marked
Marked (@guest_833101)
11 days ago
Reply to  Jacko

It’s way more than 50,000. The Russians have been using meat wave tactics with losses in the hundreds every day.

The BBC reporting, where the 50k came from, is atrociously bad.

Andy reeves
Andy reeves (@guest_833114)
11 days ago
Reply to  Marked

like everything else it does especially strictly come dancing.i REALLY HATE IT

Marked
Marked (@guest_833135)
11 days ago
Reply to  Andy reeves

It’s not a credible news source. A lot of what they report is twisted to suit whatever agenda they are pushing.

I get the impression they exaggerate Ukraine’s struggles and play down Russia’s pain to persuade the electorate that it’s right to keep on funding Ukraine. Not that I question us funding them, I wish all of us in the west would do more to get this war won as fast as possible. They don’t stick to doing what a news provider should do though, provide facts and nothing but the facts.

Jacko
Jacko (@guest_833131)
11 days ago
Reply to  Marked

Exactly There is no way that with the tactics the orcs have been using that 50000 is the correct figure! There are plenty of videos about with Russians telling of whole units being decimated.

Andy reeves
Andy reeves (@guest_833109)
11 days ago

the russians are the biggest hypocrites anywhere, they are always banging on about what the Nazis did to them.THEY have inflicted the same atrocities onto the Ukrainian people. I hope each and every on of the face the true reality in this life and the next in the flames of Hades

Cymbeline
Cymbeline (@guest_833124)
11 days ago
Reply to  Andy reeves

And what’s the best way to inflict casualties on Ukraine? I know we’ll hit the children’s hospital. They really are a bunch of scumbags along with thise country’s that give them there backing and support, shamefully you have to chuck India in that group now.

AlexS
AlexS (@guest_833125)
11 days ago
Reply to  Andy reeves

the russians are the biggest hypocrites anywhere, they are always banging on about what the Nazis did to them.

Worse, they supported Hitler until June 1941

Ian
Ian (@guest_833044)
11 days ago
Reply to  BobA

That’s 383,700 dead. The total ‘killed or wounded’ was about double that. Nonetheless a staggering death toll for a ‘special military operation’ that was supposed to be concluded in a matter of days. Then again, Soviet casualties in WWII were of the order of 20 million. The Russians consistently seem to favour the ‘send wave after wave of my own men at them’ tactic.

Baker
Baker (@guest_833060)
11 days ago
Reply to  Ian

The 20 million figure was only a guess though and don’t forget the staggering numbers of women and children who were raped on both sides started by the Germans and repeated on an epic scale by the Russians.That war was disgusting on so many levels.

FormerUSAF
FormerUSAF (@guest_833070)
11 days ago
Reply to  Ian

Believe that reasonably accurate estimates of Russian military KIA in WWI were ~1.8M, and Soviet military KIA in WWII were ~8.7M. Not certain whether Mad Vlad strives to more closely model the Tsar or Stalin as a wartime leader. 🤔

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli (@guest_833093)
11 days ago
Reply to  FormerUSAF

Many millions of Soviet POW were literally allowed to starve to death by the Germans too, or handed to the SD. So not KIA as such but included in the figures.

AlexS
AlexS (@guest_833092)
11 days ago
Reply to  Ian

I am very suspicious that UK had same number of deaths in combat as wounded in WW2.
I would have expected many more wounded.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore (@guest_833100)
11 days ago
Reply to  AlexS

The old yardstick was 4 x as many are wounded as are killed.

AlexS
AlexS (@guest_833127)
11 days ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Yeah. And today with health care improvements should be even more difference.

DaveyB
DaveyB (@guest_833057)
11 days ago

The issue for Ukraine is mass. Mass in bods and mass in equipment, they are shy on both. So don’t have a large strategic reserve, to counter major breakthroughs or go on the offensive, unless they are hiding it well. They seem to have enough to stem the flow, but no more. Even if they had an infinite amount of materiel, do they have enough manpower to exploit it?

Baker
Baker (@guest_833062)
11 days ago
Reply to  DaveyB

What really confuses me though, is the reporting of “Facts” and “Figures” of lost Russian Equipment. If you take a look at the available Tank numbers @3 years ago, and compare them with the reported losses, you will see that there is a real discrepancy here. I would love to believe the Ukraine Propaganda but there seems to be a rather large discrepancy in the actual reality.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli (@guest_833096)
11 days ago
Reply to  Baker

I thought those figures were also based on OSINT from photos and film, so pretty accurate.
I’d take the MoD figures as accurate given the intelligence sources they have access to.

Baker
Baker (@guest_833185)
11 days ago

Yes, i also look to official MOD figures which differ from the Ukrainian figures. That’s the confusion.

FormerUSAF
FormerUSAF (@guest_833576)
10 days ago
Reply to  DaveyB

Davey, Believe your assessment is substantially correct–a virtual stalemate after an additional period of trench warfare. Even this outcome may prove to be overly optimistic. In 2025, if Biden remains POTUS, he will predictably err on the side of caution in supporting UKR, and if Trump becomes POTUS, anticipate a severely restricted level of military and financial support by US for UKR, in a bid to compel UKR to negotiate a ceasefire. Absent extraordinary events, anticipate ceasefire line to be substantially the current line of demarcation. Eventually, a heavily fortified border is developed, the remnant UKR will join EU, rebuild… Read more »

DaveyB
DaveyB (@guest_833676)
9 days ago
Reply to  FormerUSAF

I don’t believe Ukraine will arbitrarily agree a ceasefire, unless they are forced to. Which may come if Trump gets re-elected. It will be a sad day for Ukraine if that happens. Personally I think it would be a mistake, as Ukraine will deliberately blank the US for post war assistance in rebuilding their country. If they are forced to by the US, could you blame them? Europe is only now ramping up the production of ammunition. It will still take about a year to be on par with what the US can currently deliver. It won’t be enough if… Read more »

Baker
Baker (@guest_833058)
11 days ago

War, is a game of numbers, that’s pretty much all it is in the minds of those who start them. Putin needs to go to the afterlife now, before he draws others into his personal war. I can’t even begin to explain my hatred for dictators and deluded egotistical maniacs with power over the many. No-one really wants to invade Russia, none of us really wants to cause harm to Russian people, quite why this latest historical Mass Murderer wants to poke the world in the eye, is beyond me. Here we are a whole 100 years after WW1 and… Read more »

Andy reeves
Andy reeves (@guest_833115)
11 days ago
Reply to  Baker

it’s interesting that parents who lost their loved ones inWW1 received £10
and their personal belongings so there you have it the true value of a life

Jacko
Jacko (@guest_833067)
11 days ago

And now the bastards have targeted a children’s hospital! How much more will it take for the international community to declare Russia a terrorist state? Anywhere else and it would have been done by now.

Andy reeves
Andy reeves (@guest_833116)
11 days ago
Reply to  Jacko

if the Ukrainians had asked for the same protection as Korea did maybe things might have been far different

DaveyB
DaveyB (@guest_833678)
9 days ago
Reply to  Jacko

Got to be careful with jumping to that conclusion. I’m playing devil’s advocate here. A lot of Russia’s cruise missiles are using GPS. Which as we know can be jammed or spoofed fairly easily. If Ukraine had a jammer on one of the military or government buildings. It may have thrown the missile’s guidance off.

Though with Russia’s past record of targeting civilian infrastructure. I am not surprised if the hospital was deliberately targeted, as they’ve targeted hospitals in the past. Sadly it’s going to be unlikely that anyone in Russia will face a war crimes trial.

Jacko
Jacko (@guest_833681)
9 days ago
Reply to  DaveyB

NO sorry that doesn’t wash at all,over 1140 civilian schools,hospitals,libraries etc have been hit!did all those have jammers near? so play what you like it’s deliberate targeting.

Last edited 9 days ago by Jacko
Bringer of facts
Bringer of facts (@guest_833076)
11 days ago

It appears the Russian military has not moved on from the Soviet days. They are using mass and attrition tactics to try and wear down both the Ukrainians on the front line and the West’s political will to stay in the fight. Bakmut and Adviika are very much pyrrhic victories for Russia. Adiivka especially shows what can happen if Western support drys up. In that scenario, attrition tactics worked. It has been predicted on a few mil blogs that Russia can sustain these losses for another 2 years. so the West needs to be prepared to keep the supplies to… Read more »

AlexS
AlexS (@guest_833094)
11 days ago

Note that Russians are learners.

Bringer of facts
Bringer of facts (@guest_833113)
11 days ago
Reply to  AlexS

Well then, they should have learned by now that the war in Ukraine won’t bring them any meaningful gains or glory and it certainly will not intimidate NATO. Withdraw the troops, and go back to Russia.

AlexS
AlexS (@guest_833128)
11 days ago

Combat learners, they improve a lot, so prepare for that.

DaveyB
DaveyB (@guest_833679)
9 days ago

A lot of the mass wave attacks are conducted by the conscripts that have had 3 to 4 months worth of training. There’s going to be huge demographic hole in Russia’s population following this war.

AlexS
AlexS (@guest_833087)
11 days ago

Causalities do not means deaths.
It means everyone hurt.

Terence Patrick Hewett
Terence Patrick Hewett (@guest_833104)
11 days ago

Great War casualties or will be before the end.

Andy reeves
Andy reeves (@guest_833106)
11 days ago

slava Ukraine

John
John (@guest_833194)
11 days ago

Radakin showing his “support” for Starmers politburo. Another useless piece of braid clad brass with ambitions. Wonder if he will howl when the inevitable Labour defence cuts come to the navy.

Jon
Jon (@guest_833204)
11 days ago
Reply to  John

At some point during his tenure as First Sea Lord he seems to have sold his ability to tell the truth. Not sure what he got in return. I hope it was more than a shiny title, because there’s no point in having the job if you can’t use it to advance the cause of the military with the public as a whole.

John
John (@guest_833220)
11 days ago
Reply to  Jon

They have all been the same since Blairs day. Yes men who want a peerage after retirement to eke out their overinflated pensions.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore (@guest_833492)
10 days ago
Reply to  John

General Patrick Sanders did not fit that description at all.