EXCLUSIVE – The UK Defence Journal can reveal the news that there has been an alleged incident of sabotage onboard HMS Glasgow, with claims that a group of disgruntled contractors have interrupted the fitting out process of the Type 26 Frigate by severing over 60 cables.

The suspected motive behind this destructive act is said to be an issue related to payment disputes, although this cannot be confirmed.

The reported incident had caused work on HMS Glasgow to come to a stop very briefly as investigators sought to identify the culprits and the root cause of their actions. Work resumed shortly after and crews are back onboard.

A spokesperson for the company stated:

“We uncovered a limited number of cables on HMS Glasgow earlier in the week, which appear to have been damaged intentionally.

We immediately launched an internal investigation, alongside our suppliers, and temporarily paused work on the ship to inspect every area of the vessel and ensure our high standards and quality controls are met.

Normal operations have now resumed and an assessment is underway to scope the repairs needed.”

In total and for context, approximately 23,000 cables will be installed on HMS Glasgow. They include data cables that provide a crucial role transmitting data between various systems, equipment, and personnel on the ship, and electrical cables which power the various systems within the ship.

BAE Systems, the main contractor responsible for the construction and fitting out of the HMS Glasgow, is understood to have taken the appropriate precautions and a source at the yard told me that there is likely no noticeable impact on the completion of the fitting out of the vessel. A source at the yard told me:

“Well, when the news broke about the sabotage on the HMS Glasgow, it certainly caught us off guard here at the yard. It’s not an everyday occurrence, that’s for sure.

But you know, despite the surprise, we’ve stayed resilient. We’re leaving the big decisions and responses to management, and focusing on our tasks at hand. It’s a testament to the spirit here – no matter what, we keep going. I don’t think we’ll be set back by this”.

In terms of the investigation, it will likely focus on identifying those responsible and understanding how they were able to carry out their actions. Measures will also be implemented to prevent similar incidents from happening in the future.

Incidents like these, while concerning, are not unheard of in large scale projects. Complex projects like shipbuilding often involve hundreds of subcontractors and a vast number of personnel, which can lead to disputes or disagreements.

A Police Scotland spokesperson said:

“Around 4.50pm on Thursday, 11 May, 2023, we were called to a report of damage discovered on a vessel in a dry dock at South Street, Glasgow. As a precaution, the ship was evacuated and enquiries are ongoing.”

Images show progress on first Type 26 Frigate in Glasgow

HMS Glasgow entered the water for the first time at the end of last year, the frigate was moved onto a barge at the Govan shipyard before being moved downriver to Glenmallan on Loch Long.

There, the barge was submerged, allowing HMS Glasgow to float off and be towed back to the city towards the BAE Scotstoun facility, where she is being fitted out.

In addition to winning the contract for the second batch of five Type 26 Frigates, BAE recently shared exciting information about new shipbuilding academy at their Clyde shipyard.

BAE planning Glasgow shipbuilding academy

Nadia Savage, Business Operations Director at BAE Systems, described the plans for an academy and why BAE Systems want to build it, “In the past, there’s no secret that shipbuilding, like many other industries, has gone through a cyclical kind of movement and that has had an impact on skills, not just in shipbuilding but across manufacturing in the UK generally.”

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George has a degree in Cyber Security from Glasgow Caledonian University and has a keen interest in naval and cyber security matters and has appeared on national radio and television to discuss current events. George is on Twitter at @geoallison
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Bill Masen
Bill Masen (@guest_722612)
11 months ago

Treason and terrorism in one go.

Drae
Drae (@guest_722649)
11 months ago
Reply to  Bill Masen

Nope, this is a public workplace if this was a Navy base then yes but it is not. This will be seen as a criminal act.

geoff
geoff (@guest_722742)
11 months ago
Reply to  Bill Masen

Agree entirely Bill. The scary thing is that on such a vital project, built-in sabotage of the kind that might only reflect later, is a real possibility on these projects. Security needs tightening up although it must be really difficult to guard against all possibilities with so many working onboard

Paul
Paul (@guest_722745)
11 months ago
Reply to  Bill Masen

I worked on a new corvette type vessel for the royal navy in ashipyard in the south of England which had been largely built in Scotland previously it was so badly tampered with in Scotland that all pipework had to be replaced they had put a full dustbin inside the funnel etc never seen anything like it before or since. Paul

Cygnet261
Cygnet261 (@guest_724013)
11 months ago
Reply to  Paul

⁹name it dickhead. The work that came up from Portsmouth sealed their fate.

Mark B
Mark B (@guest_722613)
11 months ago

Phoning up the accounts payable dept is the more traditional method of chasing an invoice – now they might deduct the cost of damages from the payment at best. Very strange behavior.

Jack
Jack (@guest_722614)
11 months ago

We used to hang for less.

Bob
Bob (@guest_722615)
11 months ago
Reply to  Jack

Wasn’t that “Arson in the Royal Docks?”

Jack
Jack (@guest_722674)
11 months ago
Reply to  Bob

Yup believe it was.

DH
DH (@guest_722687)
11 months ago
Reply to  Jack

Yerp, one days No. 1 punishment, as, awarded by courts Marshall. 1️⃣🙃.

FormerUSAF
FormerUSAF (@guest_722921)
11 months ago
Reply to  Jack

Hmmm… didn’t the RN have some salutary disciplinary practices in days of yore (e.g., lashes before the mast w/ cat of nine tails, walking the plank, drawing and quartering the hard cases)? 🤔😳😉

Smickers
Smickers (@guest_723015)
11 months ago
Reply to  FormerUSAF

Hi our American cousin I confess I am a fan of old naval fiction and factual of all eras Hanging by hauling a miscreant up a mast was the standard punishment for the worst offenders Lashes was the standard practice for disobeying the articles of war which covered a wide range of offences 5 or 10 strokes was common and by sadistic captains more than that and for hard cases flogging round the fleet would in most cases kill Also there was a rarer older punishment of keel hauling, pulling a man underneath a vessel ripping him to bits on… Read more »

FormerUSAF
FormerUSAF (@guest_723102)
11 months ago
Reply to  Smickers

Smickers,

Thanks, appreciate the tutorial! 👍 Knew that someone on this site would provide a more complete and accurate description of historical disciplinary practices. Wonder whether there is a difference in judicially prescribed punishment for acts of sabotage of military equipment during periods of declared conflict vs. ‘peacetime’? 🤔

Smickers
Smickers (@guest_723230)
11 months ago
Reply to  FormerUSAF

Hi ex USAF

Sorry mate didn’t want to tutor 🙂

The last time a Brit was hanged for treason was Lord Haw Haw (not a lord) in 1946 who broadcasted Nazi propaganda during WW11
Since then in peace imprisioned and exchange has been the standard

Also across the pond the same? I think

Barry Larking
Barry Larking (@guest_722617)
11 months ago

This bad news for the industry. Those responsible must be found and held to account.

Jonno
Jonno (@guest_722826)
11 months ago
Reply to  Barry Larking

Taken out at dawn would be the best way.

FormerUSAF
FormerUSAF (@guest_722958)
11 months ago
Reply to  Jonno

Curious re yardarms, realize it is a portion of the cross bracing of masts but diagrams appear to depict a relatively small length, difficult to attach a hangman’s rope. Would any ship’s crane prove be an adequate modern substitute? 🤔

Andrew Thorne
Andrew Thorne (@guest_722870)
11 months ago
Reply to  Barry Larking

The employees and the company that are sub-contractors should be forced to repay the costs (including selling their homes). Best way to punish people these days is through their pocket.

farouk
farouk (@guest_722618)
11 months ago

Simple, bill the idiots who did this, the full cost of repairing the damage, by taking it out of their pocket, (all in one go) you send a powerful message to other idiots

Last edited 11 months ago by farouk
Cj
Cj (@guest_722663)
11 months ago
Reply to  farouk

Can’t argue with that farouk well said.

Sean
Sean (@guest_722697)
11 months ago
Reply to  farouk

And jail them.

Quentin D63
Quentin D63 (@guest_722703)
11 months ago
Reply to  Sean

And possibly “shame” them or their company too. What a bunch of pratts! There should be proper channels to go through for disputes. A bit lax on worksite security by the look of it.

Rudeboy
Rudeboy (@guest_722720)
11 months ago
Reply to  farouk

Personally I’d charge them under the Terrorism Act…

It might get the rest of Glasgow’s dire shipbuilding workforce to up their game after glued on bolts on the River Class amongst other things…

Expat
Expat (@guest_722760)
11 months ago
Reply to  farouk

It’s actually gross miss conduct and typically instant dissmusal. I would hope in cases like this no union rep would argue otherwise and therefore these individuals can be swiftly removed.

This is why future employers need to check references as a record of gross miss conduct would be reported back making it hard to get future employment.

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke (@guest_722797)
11 months ago
Reply to  Expat

Problem is that with construction related trades as soon as you ask for a reference you are listening to the dial tone.

There is such a shortage that they just zig and zag their way round issues without ever dealing with them.

That is slowly changing as construction is now gradually slowing.

But most of them will still walk away rather than engage!

Andrew Thorne
Andrew Thorne (@guest_722873)
11 months ago
Reply to  farouk

Very good idea Farouk and I fully support that idea. This should include being forced to sell their homes if needed to repay costs if needed. People will think twice when they lose their own homes.

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke (@guest_722623)
11 months ago

Typical of agency labour employed by electrical subcontractors.

Big problem is how you let people go. It sounds like the actions of an individual who got back in after he was let go.

I had the same on a major listed building refurb – cables cut and tucked into the joists. Caused havoc with the project as the underfloor heating and floors were down!

Electrical contractor wouldn’t take responsibility, quite grinningly.

mikezeroone
mikezeroone (@guest_722624)
11 months ago

Pay your people rightly. Simple. Enough cases of local builders going ‘kill dozer’ over no pay.

Gavin Gordon
Gavin Gordon (@guest_722626)
11 months ago
Reply to  mikezeroone

Angered the Shipbuilder, the Contractor, the Union.
On an individual level; proven unworthy of efforts being made on their behalf, losses job, criminal record. Nice One, then.
Lesson to draw; think before you precipitate a course of action.

Sean
Sean (@guest_722700)
11 months ago
Reply to  mikezeroone

Your evidence they weren’t being “paid rightly”? Or are you just jumping to conclusions…

Davy H
Davy H (@guest_722627)
11 months ago

I’m sure many of us have seen this with regard to disputes over quality and/or payment. If feeling wronged, some less than bright workmen see a red mist and think they are perfectly justified to retaliate by dismantling their work instead of taking the dispute through the legal progress (it’s the tough and simple world they work in where fists often settle disputes). Probably simple vandalism and not sabotage by an elite foreign spy force. I hope they find them and blacklist them for life.

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke (@guest_722635)
11 months ago
Reply to  Davy H

Exactly this.

R.Leake
R.Leake (@guest_722628)
11 months ago

Beginning to think that the royal navy’s security needs to be examined very quickly as I’m be ginning to think that some Russian have infrilltated the workforce also beginning to think that G.H.Q. and all of our security services need a kick up the ass i can remember 20 years ago when I was a royal mail worker I was delivering mait to a top secret firm called.S.E.R.L. I used to get a cup of tea here most days but on one day I was told by security that there was a flap on and I couldn’t have a cupper..I… Read more »

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke (@guest_722636)
11 months ago
Reply to  R.Leake
Tom Riley
Tom Riley (@guest_722779)
11 months ago
Reply to  R.Leake

GCHQ does communications intelligence – they were likely listening in on what the Russians were saying. MI5 is the security service (counter intelligence) of course if you stop people spying you can’t let them see what you want them to think – it’s all smoke and mirrors.

Bubblehead
Bubblehead (@guest_722638)
11 months ago

Not everyone despises what the nation stands for, merely a small ever shrinking minority that the Scottish local council have done a great job of ensuring.

Davy H
Davy H (@guest_722645)
11 months ago

I object to that. So where should British war ship building be located? When you say “our” do you mean England only by any chance? I voted to stay in the Union and so did more than 55% of Scottish voters. Why does your kind continue to push your anti-British agenda and ignore that more people in Scotland not only consider themselves Scottish but also British? The attitude of your kind is the reason why so many Scots are swayed towards independence.

Last edited 11 months ago by Davy H
Jonathan
Jonathan (@guest_722665)
11 months ago
Reply to  Davy H

Well said.

John Stevens
John Stevens (@guest_722666)
11 months ago
Reply to  Davy H

‘Well said’

Jacko
Jacko (@guest_722675)
11 months ago
Reply to  Davy H

👍

Andrew Bruguier
Andrew Bruguier (@guest_722696)
11 months ago
Reply to  Davy H

Well said Sir.

Sean
Sean (@guest_722698)
11 months ago
Reply to  Davy H

👍🏻

Meirion X
Meirion X (@guest_722723)
11 months ago
Reply to  Davy H

👍
Me too, well said!

Barry Larking
Barry Larking (@guest_722729)
11 months ago
Reply to  Davy H

Agreed.

Wolf MacHatch
Wolf MacHatch (@guest_722733)
11 months ago
Reply to  Davy H

👍

geoff
geoff (@guest_722741)
11 months ago
Reply to  Davy H

100% agree Davy. I should ignore truly stupid comments such as this and would not discount the possibility of it being part of an orchestrated attempt to sow discord among the peoples of the UK. Surprised though at my namesake as in the past I recall he has made some good comment. Is that really you Geoffi?

River Rha
River Rha (@guest_722755)
11 months ago
Reply to  Davy H

Independence nowadays is a Moot Point: Perhaps even more so with the powers that be in the Hierarchy of the Scottish Government and the Scottish National Party whom, Perhaps, reading Writing on the Wall with the Conundrum of a lack of Social Policy working for Indigenous Scottish Populations here since birth, yet being Also-rans when Compared With the Jonny Foreigners being encouraged to come to Scotland for Repopulation Reasons and Showered With Scottish Government Incentives for doing so, Such as Repurposed Social Housing benefits when Indigenous Scots would seem to be Ignored and Provided Grievances that are Encouragements for Independence… Read more »

Andrew D
Andrew D (@guest_722648)
11 months ago

Very sad indeed hopefully the management fine out who was responsible,and both managers and work force will learn from this so it won’t happen in other defence industries .🙄

Frank62
Frank62 (@guest_722652)
11 months ago

Pretty insane. Any contractor sabotaging a RN ship build will never get any more work from the MOD & probably will black list itself with anyone else. Then there’s the criminal prosecution that will follow.

Andrew D
Andrew D (@guest_722682)
11 months ago
Reply to  Frank62

To think that theses ships are built to defend this island nation and them selfs from other nations with bad intentions is despicable .😟

Bob Young
Bob Young (@guest_722744)
11 months ago
Reply to  Frank62

They keep getting the contracts! Type 45s, B2 OPVs were all a victim of this. The same blokes glueing bolts and cutting brass off hoses are probably still working in this industry. Need more buy in from the RN and staff everywhere.

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke (@guest_722818)
11 months ago
Reply to  Bob Young

Dockyard culture wasn’t that great historically.

This wouldn’t be the first time. I can recall examples from the ‘80’s.

Jonno
Jonno (@guest_724245)
11 months ago
Reply to  Bob Young

There are some strange loyalties doing the rounds these days esp in the North. Somehow we have to isolate disaffection, not cave in to it. Working alongside people should be the best way but my experience says its hard to sus out trouble unless you are clued up by the signs and tackle it early.
One of the reasons Naval ships were UK built was to avoid sabotage.

Bam bam
Bam bam (@guest_726681)
11 months ago
Reply to  Bob Young

Once we become independent. You can build your warships in england you can also take yir nuclear weapons with yi. Think its funny yir all greeting about some disgruntled employees ‘alleged’ cutting cables when the designers cock up every new piece if mod equipment from jets to tanks to ships. 😘🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿

Cj
Cj (@guest_722661)
11 months ago

Rude.

Morgan
Morgan (@guest_722672)
11 months ago

Terrorism Act and Criminal Damage Act. I wonder if there’s more damage that hasn’t been noticed yet that could risk lives in the future?

Matt C
Matt C (@guest_722673)
11 months ago

Interesting historical precedent: HMS Conqueror’s completion was delayed by sabotage at Cammell Laird.

Black Sheep
Black Sheep (@guest_722752)
11 months ago
Reply to  Matt C

And don’t forget, that same sub went on to carry out some fantastic work in the Falklands, and only a few months later, delightedly stole a top-secret, Russian sonar array. 😀

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke (@guest_722819)
11 months ago
Reply to  Matt C

I was just thing about that.

George Allison
George Allison (@guest_722684)
11 months ago

The team that I’m told was involved was from an English subcontractor.

DH
DH (@guest_722688)
11 months ago
Reply to  George Allison

Oooh, fricken ooops.
👌😳

DH
DH (@guest_722693)
11 months ago
Reply to  DH

Well, better break out the PFHC to correct this’ dispisation’ overload 😜👍

Esteban
Esteban (@guest_722731)
11 months ago
Reply to  George Allison

And the source of that information is what George?

Sean
Sean (@guest_722699)
11 months ago

Ignorant comment.

Tom
Tom (@guest_722716)
11 months ago

Once the culprits have been found, a minimum 30 year sentence should be imposed on them for their dangerous criminal actions.

Whoever employed them should be held responsible, and made to pay the full cost for the criminal damage, as well as time wasted etc.

Do f all about it, and it could end up with other clowns doing something similar in the future.

This is a crime against the ‘state’ and it’s citizens.

Palf
Palf (@guest_722746)
11 months ago

Another reason why not to have civilian contractors working on military ships

Stephen
Stephen (@guest_722754)
11 months ago

The problem is, we have put all our eggs in one basket. BAE Systems make everything, they are the Jack of all trades, but the masters of none.

Graham
Graham (@guest_724459)
11 months ago
Reply to  Stephen

They make pretty good AFVs and artillery systems.

John
John (@guest_722762)
11 months ago

Probably the same guys that cut the cables short in Fergusons . Kick them off the job and fine their employer the full remedial costs , then ban them for life .

Geo stat
Geo stat (@guest_722765)
11 months ago

Disgraceful but not unheard of behaviour. Culprits need found and serious charges laid and make it clear anyone found to be involved will be hammered as will their employer. Interested to hear if its a failure of clearance and can be associated to any groups bouyed by apparent lack of action percieved to have been taken on groups such as Stop Oil etc

Cpl. Carrot
Cpl. Carrot (@guest_722771)
11 months ago

Hmmm, kinda reminds me of Glasgow School of Art. You know, job nearly done, no work lined up. Fuck it, torch the place. Another 3years work. Sorted.

Tom Riley
Tom Riley (@guest_722778)
11 months ago

Remember how they kept goingon about quality Scotish ship building. If a contractor with a beef can do that if the FSB put their mind to it I’m sure they could do far worse. To be honest after the cutting of the Shetland cable, US Navy ship falling over in the drydock in Perth and now this it does seem like someone might well be sabotaging ships.

Bloke down the pub
Bloke down the pub (@guest_722783)
11 months ago

When the completion of HMS Invincible was delayed, the decision was taken to bring the old HMS Bulwark out of mothballs to fill the gap. When they first tried to fire The Rusty B up, they discovered someone had poked a length of 2×2 up a steam line. Unfortunately, this sort of thing is nothing new and while some will look for motives the real reason may be as simple as ‘because they could’.

Jo Clark
Jo Clark (@guest_722791)
11 months ago

Security needs to be stepped up on the people being employed there. This is a serious matter and if done by UK nationals needs to be treated as treason.National security at these works on defense vessels is important.

ABCRodney
ABCRodney (@guest_722802)
11 months ago

I have been involved with Employee relations as both a Union Rep and a Disciplinary Manager for over 30 years and what actions you can take are limited by Employment Law. Due to those laws there are very few instances where an employer will risk summary dismissal, you would suspend and go down the disciplinary route. You need an absolute squeaky clean, solid investigation which provides the evidence, any mitigating circumstances and doesn’t infringe on their civil rights. Then you go through the process of a hearing and decide on a verdict and appropriate penalty, which would probably be dismissal.… Read more »

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke (@guest_722820)
11 months ago
Reply to  ABCRodney

It has, absolutely, to be fair.

As you say blacklists are, rightly, illegal.

So the only way of making sure that they are out of sensitive jobs is to get the police to investigate and at least charge them. That way it will show up on a records check and they can be asked about it at a screening interview.

Rotten sods who sabotage the employer are no friend of the job security of their fellow union members or non members.

ABCRodney
ABCRodney (@guest_722840)
11 months ago

The odd thing about our Judicial system is that the courts are far less forgiving and apply far harsher sentences for crimes against an employer than a private individual. If you steal a £40K car as a 1st offence it is a suspended sentence, a fine /costs and community service. Pinch £40K from your employer it is 5 years and confiscation of property to repay the loss (proceeds of crime). IMHO there needs to be more reform of how employee relations work in the older manufacturing industries. Some of our best companies have excellent profits, H&S and employee relations. And… Read more »

ABCRodney
ABCRodney (@guest_722917)
11 months ago
Reply to  ABCRodney

Hi Andy, The point is that in ER cases you have to do everything by the book. Over 30 years I have unfortunately dismissed over 20 individuals. That isn’t something I am proud of as it is effectively destroying someone’s income and effects families. But not one person ever successfully appealed my decision and no one ever took my employer to a Tribunal due to me. The key expression is to be be “fair and consistent” to be fair you have to demonstrate you have taken into account all the facts and circumstances. Hence the investigating manager has to look… Read more »

SD67
SD67 (@guest_723345)
11 months ago
Reply to  ABCRodney

Fascinated by your assertion that blacklists are illegal. You need Security Clearance to get onsite at a defence facility, including a shipyard – I certainly did at Barrow. These are difficult to obtain and easy to take away. Without SC they may no be formally blacklisted but the fact is they wont be able to work in defence. The bit about Glasgow not being government property – not necessarily. Much of the material is purchased by the MOD. It remains government property throughout the whole build – those components are tracked separately in inventory. Not sure if cabling falls into… Read more »

ABCRodney
ABCRodney (@guest_723373)
11 months ago
Reply to  SD67

My assertion regarding Blacklists is 100% factual within the context of Civil Employment Law and has been backed up by the Courts on numerous occasions (some of the fines were eye watering). Which is why an employer cannot pass on any information that would be detrimental to an individuals character (nor the reverse of a glowing reference). The security clearance implications are a completely separate issue as are Criminal investigations and override Employment confidentiality. Fair to say when someone gets caught they will never go near anything important again. Which is why IMHO this should be a Police matter and… Read more »

SD67
SD67 (@guest_723385)
11 months ago
Reply to  ABCRodney

Thanks, I wasn’t aware of that Black list thing at all. And firms were convicted? Which means someone in HR formally wrote the blacklist down as a policy, staggeringly dumb if so, I bet they were popular. Yes absolutely this is a matter for the Police.
Weird things go on in shipyards

ABCRodney
ABCRodney (@guest_723395)
11 months ago
Reply to  SD67

The most notorious incident in recent years was when dozens of major building firms were taken to court by the GMB on behalf of 50 union members. They were actually operating a database of black listed workers, who were mainly Union Activists or H&S savvy. It was settled out of court and £1.9 million in costs plus over £30 million in individual compensations, plus retraining costs.
Moral is just conform basic info and nothing else on a reference.

Colin
Colin (@guest_722832)
11 months ago

A terrorist act against our Armed forces culprits should be named/shamed and jailed.

Andrew Thorne
Andrew Thorne (@guest_722869)
11 months ago

I looked up the treason laws in the UK. In principle you can get a slap on the hand to a whole life tarriff. One thing I noted is you also lose your right to vote a well and from holding public office. It;’s not likely this would fall under treason unless they acted for a foreign power and even that it’s unlikely they would be charged with that offence as it pertains more to state and military secrets and working directly for foreign governments we are at war with. However, the government is looking at a law on sabotage:… Read more »

G. Weare
G. Weare (@guest_722898)
11 months ago

Perhaps it was down to cash flow problems and late payment of wages?
However. A serious criminal offence has occurred, and the above possibility – if the cause – is no excuse.

Steph
Steph (@guest_722899)
11 months ago

Disgruntled contractors lol yeah right. I’m sure.

Something Different
Something Different (@guest_722907)
11 months ago

UKDJ’s coverage made it to the BBC website, George’s (and the team’s) influence keeps on growing:

‘The military news website UK Defence Journal, which reported the incident, suggested that it may have been sabotage by a contractor in a payment dispute.’

simon alexander
simon alexander (@guest_723009)
11 months ago
Watcherzero
Watcherzero (@guest_722908)
11 months ago

Is this contractor a certain other government owned shipyard currently building ferrys who have suffered a host of wiring problems?

Steved40
Steved40 (@guest_722911)
11 months ago

Treason. Pure and simple. Find them, prosecute them, lock them up and throw away the key.

Paul
Paul (@guest_722922)
11 months ago

The law should be applied in full force and the individuals should be sacked and made to pay for the damage. Security in on and around all navel vessels yards and docks and bases should be tightened as soon as possible especially with russia threatening all sorts of things nowadays. Military personnel should be on all projects and building of allroyal navy ship’s. Also I think and believe that in future especially with Scotland clearly hating England and the uk that new ports and yards also current existing ports and yards ect should be built in England as well as… Read more »

George
George (@guest_722923)
11 months ago

Deja vu. Type 42 Destroyer. HMS Glasgow shipyard fire 23 September 1976. That was a rather suspicious event too. Identification of one of the bodies raised some questions. I’m not sure if that was released to the public or not.

Tom
Tom (@guest_722925)
11 months ago

The culprits could be found out, however it may require some ‘harsh or draconian’ measures in order to do so. The modern world does not have the stomach for such things, so I can see criminal damage such as this, happening again.

jon
jon (@guest_722926)
11 months ago

Oh Dear BAEs and its contractors either its Supa-Glue or walking around clipping cables, now the only thing is they would of all logged into the system. and if they know when this happened. they should be Arrested and Charged because that will remove there SC clearance. BAEs will just pay to replace the cables and hush it up. Maybe pulling them from tendering again as a sole bidder needs to happen. but then other yards are just as bad.

Patrick morgan
Patrick morgan (@guest_722928)
11 months ago

We need our ships built here and this won’t help the quest. Further, if some slimy toad management types are holding back payment- then these individuals should be named and shamed then dealt with in similar manner.

Andrew Bailyes
Andrew Bailyes (@guest_722942)
11 months ago

This ought to be treated as treason. If the suspects are identified and charged with just criminal damage then they’ll be let off lightly.

Wasp snorter
Wasp snorter (@guest_722953)
11 months ago

Surely this is classed as treason, wilfully sabotaging defence.

Michelle
Michelle (@guest_722960)
11 months ago

Well if true they should close the whole yard until they have found the culprits, their reason behind it and make them repair what they cut, allegedly. After that close the shipyard crew down and replacebthem temporarily whilst the reasons behind it are met. Then reinstate them unless there is a security risk.

Gunbuster
Gunbuster (@guest_723006)
11 months ago

It happens.When Rosyth went from Royal Dockyard to Babcock there with “issues” with the ships in refit up there. Stuff removed to the workshops became lost ( Ships Siren for example) , smashed gauges on equipment.
The shot blasting of the deck inside the GT down take wasn’t sabotage that was just someone who was thick as mince and didnt know what they where doing. Engine out. Hung upside down. Shaken until all the shot fell out of it then back in. It worked. Job done.

Gunbuster
Gunbuster (@guest_723007)
11 months ago

The repair may be simple or not. Multi core cables mean a re run. You cannot add Junction boxes . If its HVAC cables, re run. So through bulkhead connectors ripped out cables pulled , re run and new through bulkhead connectors . Most multi way connectors are just like small horizontal manholes. Cables go through, some packing pieces go in and then intumescent mastic goes in. Hopefully they havent been filled with mastic yet as she’s still fitting out. You also need to make sure the cables go in the right way round. Looking at the ends of a… Read more »

A Humphrey
A Humphrey (@guest_723078)
11 months ago

Should withdraw the contract with BAE that way nobody will get their pay rise until someone tells on someone