ASRAAM Block 6 standard is due to enter service on Typhoon in 2022 and F-35 Lightning II in 2024.

John Healey, MP for Wentworth and Dearne, aked via a written question:

“To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether the ASRAAM Sustainment programme has entered service on the (a) Typhoons and (b) F-35 IIs.”

Jeremy Quin, Minister for Defence Procurement, responded:

“The ASRAAM sustainment programme continues to be delivered within Complex Weapons Portfolio contract price. On current plans, the resultant ASRAAM Block 6 standard is due to enter service on Typhoon in 2022 and F-35 Lightning II in 2024.”

ASRAAM is in service with the Royal Air Force as its ‘Within Visual Range’ anti-air missile. The weapon is also in operational service with the Royal Australian Air Force on its F/A-18 Hornet.

According to MBDA:

“In Within Visual Range (WVR) air combat, the ability to strike first is vital. A pilot engaging an enemy needs a missile that reacts more rapidly than ever before with the speed and agility to maximise the probability of a kill, regardless of evasive target manoeuvres or the deployment of countermeasures. ASRAAM has proven this capability.

ASRAAM accepts target information via the aircraft sensors, such as the radar or helmet mounted sight but can also act as an autonomous infrared search and track system. The RAAF has demonstrated successful ‘over the shoulder’ firing in Lock On After Launch (LOAL) mode against target drones that were behind the wing-line of the launch aircraft.”

The new block 6 ASRAAM was developed to meet UK requirements, and this incorporated new and updated sub-systems, including a new-generation seeker of increased pixel density, and a built-in cryogenic cooling system.

This new seeker is manufactured in Bolton, England, and is entirely U.S. international traffic in arms regulations (ITAR) subjected components free. Why does that matter? According to this source, a previous attempt to sell the missile to Saudi Arabia was scuttled because of objections from Washington. The missile’s seeker is made in American, thus requiring export approval from the United States.

MBDA has developed a new Block 6 variant of the ASRAAM dogfight missile that removes American-made components so that any export of the weapon will not be subjected to ITAR.

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Steve
Steve
22 days ago

RAAF only uses the ASRAAM on the original classic Hornets which will be retiring in the next 2 years. The RAAF Super Hornets, Growlers and F-35As use the AIM-X Block2.

John N
John N
22 days ago
Reply to  Steve

Actually the last Squadron of RAAF Classic Hornets retire within the next two months, eg, by years end.

Two Squadrons have already converted to F-35A, the third is currently in the process and the fourth, and last, starts conversion in the new year.

Cheers,

RobW
RobW
22 days ago
Reply to  Steve

Are you saying that AIM-9X is better than the new ASRAAM?

BB85
BB85
22 days ago
Reply to  RobW

A lot of competitors sacrificed range and speed for additional maneuverability, I don’t see how any manned jet is going to out maneuver an asraam turning at 50G though.

John N
John N
22 days ago
Reply to  RobW

I don’t think Steve was saying that one missile was better than the other, just the simple fact that ASRAAM is fitted to the soon to retire Classic Hornet fleet and AIM-9X is fitted to the three newer RAAF fast jets. And there is a simple reason for that, the RAAF has kept the configuration of the Super Hornets and Growlers identical to the USN, and at this stage, the F-35A to the USAF configuration. If you look at most of the ADFs more recent aviation acquisitions it’s made more sense to keep identical configurations to that of the primary… Read more »

Andrew Deacon
Andrew Deacon
21 days ago
Reply to  RobW

9x and the existing Asraam use the same seeker but Asraam has much longer range due to a bigger rocket motor, 9x is probably more manoeuvrable though as I believe it has some sort of thrust vectoring. I believe the Aussies chose Asraam over 9x as neither was integrated on the hornet at the time so they just went for the best option. Of course the supers and f35 come ready to go with 9x. It’s interesting that the Saudis use European weapons on their typhoons and tornados but US weapons on their f15’s. I guess the cost of integration… Read more »

Pete
Pete
22 days ago
Reply to  Steve
Rob N
Rob N
21 days ago
Reply to  Pete

Yes very interesting. It sounds like the 9X is more about using old stock then anything new. Once the new ASRAAM is in service with the new seeker it will dominate the short to medium range fight. With Meteor the Typhoon will have an unmatched capability.

I understand that ASRAAM can be cued by either radar or EO and can lock-on-after-launch so you can shoot it in the direction of a target and it will do the rest…

An impressive weapone.

DaveyB
DaveyB
21 days ago
Reply to  Pete

It’s a good read, perhaps giving away a bit too much information in regards to specific performances. Though it does give a layman’s guide to their relative performance to each other. I’m glad he states the advantages that a throttle-able engine will have in an engagement along with the disadvantages that a thrust vectoring system has for longer distance engagements. In a close in dogfight, a missile with a thrust vectoring system (TVS) will have the initial advantage. However, as soon as the fuel runs out, it has to rely on the aerodynamic surfaces for steering and the built up… Read more »

pete
pete
20 days ago
Reply to  DaveyB

I’m with you on the Meteor and ASRAAM combination. Great capability and overlap. Have to say I’ve gone back to this link a few times over the past few years and I’m drawn to his comment (speculation) that ultimately air dominance may come from long range loitering type weapons fired from whatever aircraft can carry the most (he mentions 747’s to convey his point), or even just launched from trucks (in a defensive mode I assume). Keep thinking… is the future something like Wedgetail with 30 next gen meteors and 10 ASRAAM fitted, direct energy weapons to deal with incoming… Read more »

Daveyb
Daveyb
19 days ago
Reply to  pete

The future will belong to the person who can maintain and operate the most loyal wingman style UAVs. By which I mean operating in a hostile kinetic and RF environment with enough airframes to maintain attritional losses. Until UAVs use directional data-links (as per F35) they will be susceptible to hacking and jamming. Russia has so far proved that they are very good at both hacking and jamming of radio data communications, eg hacking and jamming GPS, hacking RAF personnel’s mobile phones in Estonia etc. How would a loyal wingman UAV contend with this level of attack, as by their… Read more »

Andrew Deacon
Andrew Deacon
19 days ago
Reply to  DaveyB

Interesting that German typhoons will have a standard fit of 4 meteor, 2 AMRAAM and 2 iris t , perhaps an admission that the Iris t is a bit short legged and perhaps meteor isn’t as good at closer in engagements 8-15 km as amraam?
What do you think of mica ? Available in both IR and radar versions and presumably somewhere between Asraam and amraam range wise. I think the french fly with 4 mica and 2 meteor on their Rafaels. Mica on its own was considered a bit lightweight but the combination looks good.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
22 days ago

It might be just in time. Will we, won’t we!

Another possible good reason for not retiring the Tranche 1s too early?

President Joe Biden said the US would defend Taiwan if China attacked, in an apparent departure from a long-held US foreign policy position.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-59005300

Last edited 22 days ago by Nigel Collins
BB85
BB85
21 days ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

His aids where quick to correct him, which is worrying. Taiwan is a wealthy country if they where given the same military support as Israel China would soon get the message

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
19 days ago
Reply to  BB85

They will increase their defence spending next year and possibly purchase more F-16s. I wonder if they’re considering the F-15EX?

Taiwan will spend $1.4 billion on new fighter jet as the island nation announces a modest rise in defence spending for next year.

https://www.aero-mag.com/lockheed-martin-f-16-31082021

Last edited 19 days ago by Nigel Collins
JohninMK
JohninMK
21 days ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Since corrected by the WH as the US Taiwan Relations Act does not include an explicit commitment to intervene militarily in the event of an invasion of or attack on Taiwan by the mainland.

Crabfat
Crabfat
22 days ago

Good to hear that the missile is not subject to US ITAR restrictions. Not getting into a discussion on the pro’s and con’s of arms sales but just saying it’s good that we can sell our own British made ‘goods’ to anyone, without permission from a 3rd party.

Anyone know what issues (legal or otherwise) the EU would have had, on UK arms sales, if we were still been a member?

Crabfat
Crabfat
22 days ago
Reply to  Crabfat

‘…had we still been…’

Steve
Steve
22 days ago
Reply to  Crabfat

EU has export controls, that limit sale of certain goods to certain countries. So the UK arms industry would need to follow those rules if we were still a member. Saying that they are countries I wouldn’t want us exporting to, so no issue there for me. Plus as a member we would have voted in them controls anyway, so it’s a mute point.

Last edited 22 days ago by Steve
Crabfat
Crabfat
22 days ago
Reply to  Steve

Thanks, Steve

Rob N
Rob N
21 days ago
Reply to  Steve

News update, we are no longer in the EU thank God….

Joe16
Joe16
22 days ago
Reply to  Crabfat

Likewise, I wouldn’t be surprised if the mass take-up of AIM-9X isn’t just due to the wide use of US aircraft, but also because of ITAR-related restrictions that are imposed on us. The EU rules are more similar to embargoes in my understanding; if there is a country that is committing human rights abuses etc. then they are put on a red list. But I believe that all countries have a say in who goes on there, and the French are big arms exporters too- so it pays more than one country to keep that red list reserved for the… Read more »

Rob N
Rob N
21 days ago
Reply to  Joe16

The US often pushes its partners to buy US. Often linking platform sales to their kit. It is made the path of leat resistance to buy a US platform and its US weapons. Uk examples of this include UK P8s and AH64Es.

Rudeboy1
Rudeboy1
22 days ago
Reply to  Crabfat

Germany was/is one of the main hold ups on the sale of the additional 48 Typhoon to Saudi Arabia…its gone very quiet in recent years so might be dead. The German’s were making noises about opposing it however, due to the war in Yemen.

Dave G
Dave G
22 days ago
Reply to  Rudeboy1

Was the german ability to veto because of their membership of the EU or because Germany was one of the 4 partners in the eurofighter consortium though? I suspect the latter but don’t know…

James M
James M
21 days ago
Reply to  Dave G

Very much the latter. That’s mainly because the French are very keen to sell their kit to anyone that’ll buy it, so EU export regs rarely (if ever) stop countries selling weapons to whoever they want. The more common issue is specific member states who made components for the weapons objecting, and that’s an issue you’ll get in any system using components from a variety of countries (which is basically every modern weapon that’s not a rifle). Two good examples would be when Germany stopped us selling Meteor to the Saudis (the French sided with us on this, mainly because… Read more »

James
James
22 days ago
Reply to  Crabfat

A no undercutting rule existed whilst in the EU, in other words the Australian sub deal change of hands would not have happened and if it did the UK certainly wouldnt be involved in it.

ATH
ATH
19 days ago
Reply to  James

I’d like to see you produce that rule. I’d be very surprised if you can.

James
James
15 days ago
Reply to  ATH

Search it yourself, I found it quite easily.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
22 days ago

Carried on the outer wing pylons on the F-35B and only after Block IV software has been installed. Is that still the case as it would compromise its stealth characteristics? Block IV has been pushed back until 2026, has that changed which also includes the next generation of Spear? “ASRAAM Block 6 is currently scheduled for integration with the F-35B as part of the Block IV software release. F-35 Carriage The original intent was for four ASRAAM to be carried internally. This then changed to internal and external, some test fits were made on mock-ups and development aircraft. Following the… Read more »

Last edited 22 days ago by Nigel Collins
Ron5
Ron5
22 days ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

ASRAAM is already in service on the UK F-35B’s and have been carried on combat missions

comment image?auto=compress%2Cformat&ixlib=php-3.3.0&s=bd908b0814d417e7c9830e1c5bd7ff8d

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
22 days ago
Reply to  Ron5

First sentence.

There’s a very big clue in the F-35 Lightning II in 2024.”Good to know It’s already been flown successfully on combat missions though!

“ASRAAM Block 6 standard is due to enter service on Typhoon in 2022 and F-35 Lightning II in 2024.”

BB85
BB85
22 days ago

The US is a disgrace how they us ITAR to block other countries export sales purely for commercial reasons. They have no problem sell the Saudis billions in F15s but dont even thinking about buying someone else’s missiles

James William Fennell
James William Fennell
22 days ago

Block 6 makes sense for the RAF because it has benefitted from CAMM development. ASRAAM has recently been sold to India and will be licence assembled by India too.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
22 days ago

Should be a very useful addition as will the next-gen Spear family.

Last edited 22 days ago by Nigel Collins
David
David
22 days ago

How does the new Block 6 ASRAAM stack up against the newest Chinese/Russian short range AAMs? I read elsewhere they are very deadly and are to be respected.

Rudeboy1
Rudeboy1
22 days ago
Reply to  David

It will have a superior seeker and far superior range.
Russian ones are shorter ranged and are fairly outdated.
Chinese ones seem to be stolen IRIS-T’s and Python designs, likely to be inferior to both.
Asraam Blk.6 should remain the best WVR missile in the world.

James William Fennell
James William Fennell
22 days ago
Reply to  David

The Russian Vympel R-74 is more in the AIM-9X/Python-5/A-Darter/IRIS-T design concept – a smaller diameter rocket motor giving less speed and range (Mach 2.5 / 25Km range). IRIS-T is faster than the others at Mach 3. The Chinese PL9 and PL10 are heavily influenced by the Israeli Python and South African/Brazilian A-Darter repectively (indeed maybe developments of these missiles – again in the Mach 2.5 / 25Km range bracket). ASRAAM has a larger motor than these types and is in the Mach 3.5 / 40-50Km range (the RAF are coy about range). The French MICA IR version has longer range… Read more »

Last edited 22 days ago by James William Fennell
David
David
22 days ago

Hi James, Thank you for sharing your insights – much appreciated. Just a couple of questions if I may ask for your input: 1) How effective is the RAF Typhoon’s DASS (I understand the RAF has the most comprehensive suite of all Typhoon operators) against the current crop of Russian and Chinese AAMs. I understand the RAF’s Typhoon also operates the BriteCloud decoy. Not sure if we are the only Typhoon operator that does. 2) Do you think the Block 6 seeker upgrade will be ported over to Sea Ceptor? I understand they are essentially the same missile (ASRAAM and… Read more »

James William Fennell
James William Fennell
22 days ago
Reply to  David

1 Praetorian DASS is comprehensive but eye wateringly expensive. It comprises ESM-Radar Warning Receivers, a Laser Warning Receiver (only on RAF and Saudi Typhoons), wingtip ECM pods (capable of 360 degree jamming of multiple air and ground targets using classification data from the ESM) which are getting new antennas under P1E, three passive / active Missile Approach Warners in the wing roots and tail (360 coverage), SAAB developed Countermeasures Dispensers (carried externally underwing), which can carry flares, chaff, the Typhoon IR decoy and the new Britecloud Active Decoy. One or two Leonardo developed Towed Radar Decoys can also be deployed… Read more »

Last edited 22 days ago by James William Fennell
James William Fennell
James William Fennell
22 days ago

Interestingly Sea Venom uses an IR seeker, so that may be coevolutionary with Brimstone/Spear 3 and ASRAAM IR seekers.

Last edited 22 days ago by James William Fennell
David
David
21 days ago

Hi James again. Thank you for sharing your knowledge – I appreciate it when people on this forum share their comprehensive knowledge to help us all learn. With regard to Praetorian DASS, how effective would it be against the latest S300/400 systems? I get the impression NATO countries and even the Israelis are very, very cautious with it – some would even say fearful. I also read it’s very presence in Syria was enough to prevent us and the Israelis carrying out strikes against Assad – not all strikes to be sure but it was an effective deterrent. Even the… Read more »

James William Fennell
James William Fennell
21 days ago
Reply to  David

S300/400 is something of a moveable feast (literally). Its basically an updated and mobile version of the intergrated air defence system used by the RAF in 1940. Each system can have up to eight battalions of SAMs (6 long range and 2 short range), with 72 launchers for a full fat 8 battalion system (350+ ready missiles). Not all systems or operators use this many launchers. On their own each battalion of 9 launchers can only engage one target at a time but when used in conjunction with the 91/92N family of long range radars the S3/400 system can detect… Read more »

Last edited 21 days ago by James William Fennell
Netking
Netking
21 days ago
Reply to  David

Interesting. I came away with the opposite impression based on what I’ve read.

https://breakingdefense.com/2020/06/unanswered-israeli-air-strikes-against-syria-raise-s-400-questions/

If I remember right, at one point in time there was just a single battery deployed and even a system as supposedly sophisticated as the S400 is advertised to be, it stands little chance against a coordinated attack from NATO, especially the way that system was deployed. Remember all the videos of the IAF flying seemingly unbothered and killing several modern pantsir systems. The s400 was already deployed then as far as I’m aware.

Last edited 21 days ago by Netking
DaveyB
DaveyB
21 days ago
Reply to  David

Praetorian is up there with the best. In a lot of respects it is better than the Rafale’s Spectra. As each element can function independently from the rest, but still combine the information easily for the pilot. Spectra has an issue that when it’s jamming it blanks out it’s RWR. Praetorian is built by Eurodass, which is made up by the four partner Nations. As part of a further upgrade they have agreed on further evolution of Praetorian. This is being led by Leonardo. This will look at future proofing the Typhoon’s DASS to meet current and predicted threats. It… Read more »

James William Fennell
James William Fennell
21 days ago

As a correction, the Python-5 and A-Darter are shorter ranged (20km) but quick around Mach 4 (similar to ASRAAM) and agile. The Chinese PL9 and 10 are liely to be similar, AIM-9X, IRIS-T, R-73 are a little longer ranged (25km) and around Mach 3. The most similar to ASRAAM is the Japanese AAM-5, which has 35km range at Mach 3+. ASRAAM is rumoured to be good out to 50km and make Mach 3.5-4.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
21 days ago
Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
22 days ago
Reply to  David

China has introduced a new variant of the PL-15, which will be used on their J-20 and J-16 fighters.

Mach 4 capable, but the seeker will not be quite in the same league as Meteor which will be updated in the 2024/6 timeframe with a Mitsubishi AESA seeker if all goes to PLAN!

Russia and China are currently developing BVRAAM with AESA seekers so the race is on in this area too!

The picture shows an A J-20 carrying four PL-15 missiles and two PL-10 missiles.

89079624-2114-11ec-83d0-b8338c7f9150_1320x770_024706.jpeg
Last edited 22 days ago by Nigel Collins
Peter tattersll
Peter tattersll
22 days ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

China a Russia make a lot of claims

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
22 days ago

I think it’s time to start taking both very seriously! “China reportedly tests a nuclear-capable hypersonic missile 03:02 (CNN)China’s test of a nuclear-capable hypersonic missile has given new fuel to critics of President Joe Biden’s ambitious agenda to scale back America’s nuclear arsenal, with intelligence and defense officials warning that the Chinese launch marked a significant technological leap that could threaten the US in new ways. Intelligence officials told the Senate Intelligence Committee in private briefings that the Chinese test — which they tracked closely as it was happening — marked a substantial advancement in China’s ability to launch a strategic first strike against… Read more »

Last edited 22 days ago by Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
22 days ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

“China also built and successfully tested the technology faster than the US predicted they might be able to, according to a former arms control official who served until January. A hypersonic test carried out by the Pentagon on Thursday, meanwhile, failed — the second failed test since April.”

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
21 days ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Do you think the governments and militarys of the west and APAC region aren’t taking China seriously? Do you know something they don’t?

Pete
Pete
22 days ago
Reply to  David

Read the debate / article I posted further up. Interesting discussion on the relative merits and disadvantages of alternative WVR design philosophies.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
21 days ago
Reply to  David

It will also be interesting to see how the F-35B will be configured due to its limitations for intercept missions and dogfighting capabilities, so I’m guessing potential adversaries will be aware of this and could very well take advantage of it? “This issue was closed on December 17, 2019 with no further actions and concurrence from the U.S. services,” the F-35 JPO statement read. “The [deficiency report] was closed under the category of ‘no plan to correct,’ which is used by the F-35 team when the operator value provided by a complete fix does not justify the estimated cost of… Read more »

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
21 days ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Hopefully, we will have a better and factual idea as to how these weapons will perform sometime next year. “Assessment • The JSE is required to complete 64 mission trials against modern, fielded near-peer adversary threats in realistic densities. The JSE is the only venue available, other than actual combat against near-peer adversaries, to adequately evaluate the F-35 due to inherent limitations associated with open-air testing. The delays in having the JSE ready for formal test events will likely slip completion of IOT&E into mid-to-late CY21. • All results of the F-35 IOT&E, including the weapons trials, will be included… Read more »

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
21 days ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

In relation to Russia and Chinas airpower, this comprehensive report sheds more light on the subject thanks to Google!

Whitehall Report 3-20

Russian and Chinese Combat Air Trends Current Capabilities and Future Threat Outlook Justin Bronk

https://static.rusi.org/russian_and_chinese_combat_air_trends_whr_final_web_version.pdf

Gunbuster
Gunbuster
22 days ago

ITAR and ECR are a US way of ensuring you only buy American. The things covered by the rules are very wide ranging… The obvious stuff like high tech electronics, oil industry and underwater tech but also things like life jackets and horses! There where issues with the single 30 fitted to a middle east countries Mine Hunters. The same mount fitted to RN vessels. The very small gyro used for mount stabilisation was from the US and until it was replaced with a French unit the gun mounts couldn’t be sold. The thing with ITAR is it affects whole… Read more »

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
22 days ago
Reply to  Gunbuster

The other side of the ITAR coin is you don’t use US bits if you can help it.

So it is kind of driving down US parts usage.

Rudeboy1
Rudeboy1
22 days ago

Initially it benefitted US industry, but then US manufacturers started to really use it to their advantage and pushed the legislation far further than it was supposed to go. A sensible bit of legislation is now having the opposite effect as competitor’s and allies are developing their own gear and cutting the US out of the equation.

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
22 days ago
Reply to  Rudeboy1

Yes indeed and they wonder why so much electronic input and cooperation is now headed to the east than across the pond. America First for others means America Last and is inevitably hitting them hard but there is always going to be some interest group there to stop a more enlightened approach and then of course there is the endless legal challenges….

Quentin D63
Quentin D63
22 days ago

Is there any development of a twin launchers for the ASRAAM on the F-35B or can the outer launch rail only take one? And can the inner pylon’s take a Meteor on the F-35B so potentially in “beast mode” up to 8 meteors? Can the Typhoon take up to 6-8 Meteors?
I think I read somewhere that the P8s going to be fitted out for ASRAAMs too but I could be imagining that.

jR
jR
21 days ago
Reply to  Quentin D63

The RAF have never destroyed another aircraft in combat since WW2. Wonder how soon this could change?

James William Fennell
James William Fennell
21 days ago
Reply to  jR

Not exactly true, the RAF shot down three Egyptian aircraft in 1946, and RAF loan pilots shot down MiG 15s in USAF F-86s over Korea. A Javelin is rumoured to have shot down an Indonesian C-130 and a Hunter a MiG 17 in 1963-5 and RAF Flt Lt David Morgan shot down two A4s on one mission during the Falklands war in a SHAR. An RAF F4 accidentially shot down a Bruggen Jag in the 1980s. On the other side of the coin 3 RAF Spitfires and a Tempest were shot down by the IAF in 1947 (by IAF Spitfires… Read more »

Last edited 21 days ago by James William Fennell
James William Fennell
James William Fennell
21 days ago

An interesting interception was by an ECM Valiant over Suez at night, which managed to track an Egyptian Meteor nightfighter, but had no means to shoot it down!

Pete
Pete
21 days ago
Reply to  jR

A2A no…but plenty on the ground

Ron5
Ron5
21 days ago
Reply to  jR

An RAF Phantom shot down an RAF Jaguar over Germany.

James William Fennell
James William Fennell
21 days ago
Reply to  Quentin D63

These days sensors and BVR weapons are so good that SRAAMs are really for last ditch use – so more likely to carry more Meteor than ASRAAM.

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
21 days ago
Reply to  Quentin D63

I’ve seen a CGI image of a Typhoon carrying 14 Meteors and 2 ASRAAM. But know idea if the load out in the image will become a reality.

Quentin D63
Quentin D63
20 days ago
Reply to  Robert Blay.

Wow, that’s quite a load and many million of pounds hanging under the wings!

DaveyB
DaveyB
21 days ago
Reply to  Quentin D63

According to the hard-point’s maximum weight, the outer pylon is limited to 300lbs (136kg). iASRAAM weighs 194lbs (88kg). Therefore, it can’t carry two ASRAAMs.

James William Fennell
James William Fennell
21 days ago
Reply to  DaveyB

You mean it can’t carry two on the outer pylon like this?comment image&f=1&nofb=1

Last edited 21 days ago by James William Fennell
James M
James M
21 days ago

That’s just an optical illusion. This photo was taken a minute before the one you’ve linked and shows the missile is on the next hardpoint along.

Quentin D63
Quentin D63
20 days ago
Reply to  James M

Lol… 😁

James William Fennell
James William Fennell
20 days ago
Reply to  James M

😀 Indeed, many pylons makes light work – no need for draggy solutions to carry two weapons on a single pylon as on earlier designs.

Andrew Deacon
Andrew Deacon
21 days ago

Interesting article on Asraam block 6 below:
https://www.timesaerospace.aero/features/defence/asraams-six-appeal

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
21 days ago

How to put 4th gen fighters back in the game!

The Navy’s new missile could make non-stealth fighters viable again
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MCqky2-AtvA&t=627s