Technology to protect emerging wideband receivers from interference, enabling their use in contested and congested environments, is being developed by BAE.

BAE Systems say they will design mechanisms for the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) that protect emerging wideband receivers from interference, enabling their use in contested and congested environments.

“DARPA awarded two contracts to BAE Systems totaling $5 million under the Wideband Adaptive RF Protection (WARP) program which is designed to develop wideband adaptive filtering and signal cancellation architectures to safeguard emerging wideband receivers against both external and self-interference.”

“The ability to control signal strength across the electromagnetic spectrum is critical to the robust operation of wideband RF electronics,” said Chris Rappa, product line director at BAE Systems’ FAST Labs research and development organization.

“WARP signal filters and cancellers will sense and adapt to the electromagnetic environment through the intelligent control of adaptive hardware.”

The technical areas of the programme focus on enhancing electronic warfare technology to improve “adaptive control of electromagnetic spectrum” – enabling allied forces to freely operate while denying that advantage to adversaries.

Specifically, Technical Area 1 is focused on mitigating external interference and Technical Area 2 is focused on mitigating self-interference from co-located transmitters to enable same-frequency simultaneous transmit and receive, also known as STAR.

You can read more here.

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captain p wash
captain p wash
6 months ago

ermmm …. huh ?

Malcolm Rich
Malcolm Rich
6 months ago
Reply to  captain p wash

it would take too long to explain sorry as it is highly technical

captain p wash
captain p wash
6 months ago
Reply to  Malcolm Rich

init…… !

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
6 months ago
Reply to  captain p wash

I think it means defence for satellite bandwidth so we can operate UAV’S and share huge amounts of date between platforms when the bad guys are trying to be silly buggers.

dan
dan
6 months ago

RF stuff is hard. lol

George Royce
George Royce
6 months ago

That fighter design is something we should be doing. But apparently, that gets fellow commenters the hump. We all know tailerons are a thing of the past, just like canards are. They’re giant radar-reflecting surfaces that will ultimately be dropped for 6th gen jets.

All the more reason why we need to focus on jet thrust through the surface controls i.e. Bae Magma and rudder flaps on the wings alla Taranis.

captain p wash
captain p wash
6 months ago
Reply to  George Royce

Ermmm Huh ? (Again) lol……

George Royce
George Royce
6 months ago
Reply to  captain p wash

The fighter shown in the thumbnail. That’s the FA/XX.

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
6 months ago
Reply to  George Royce

And for all we know, Tempest may look something like that.

George Royce
George Royce
6 months ago
Reply to  Robert Blay.

No indications that it will; so far.

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
6 months ago
Reply to  George Royce

I would take the plastic mock up of Tempest with a very large pinch of Salt in reference to what it’s final design layout will look like.

George Royce
George Royce
6 months ago
Reply to  Robert Blay

I hope so

ETH
ETH
6 months ago
Reply to  George Royce

No indications it won’t. All concept images so far are very unlikely to resemble the final design.

Hermes
Hermes
6 months ago
Reply to  George Royce

At high speed its easy to suppress them today.
But for low speed it’s not the same.
Thats why the NGF comes from this view:
comment image

To this:
comment image

George Royce
George Royce
6 months ago
Reply to  Hermes

I don’t quite follow what you mean. Could you elaborate?

Airborne
Airborne
6 months ago

I’m pretty good with comms, modern military tech and the implementation of tactics and asymmetric warfare ISTAR etc…..but….sometimes I don’t have a clue what’s being said 😂.

Watcherzero
Watcherzero
6 months ago

Ok people seem to be struggling I will try and simplify with an analogy. Traditionally radios operated on a single frequency, you tuned a receiver to pick up that particular broadcast frequency and could filter out the noise to get the signal, if it was being jammed you and your partner will try switching to a different pre-arranged backup frequency instead. Nowadays with high bandwidth requirements and to try and defeat jamming they will broadcast a signal on several different radio frequencies simultaneously either the same data on different frequencies to try and find one which will break through jamming/interference,… Read more »

Last edited 6 months ago by Watcherzero
Joe16
Joe16
6 months ago
Reply to  Watcherzero

Good description. It may also help people to understand what jamming is: someone sending a more powerful signal at the same frequency as your signal to drown it out. Thus, in the same way as the signals Watcherzero described above, you can generally only jam specific frequencies at a time- depending on how many different channels you can broadcast your noise on at the same time. Similarly this is how spoofing works except that, instead of just white noise, the override signal is one that looks like the real thing. This is particularly of issue with signals to and from… Read more »

john melling
john melling
6 months ago

Something about protecting communications from the enemy

KPB
KPB
6 months ago

Say again, Over.

I had to google ‘self-interference’ but I wasn’t quite expecting the results I got back. No wonder planes have autopilots so they can fly hands-free.