A Royal Air Force C-17 Globemaster recently delivered Army Air Corps Apache helicopters to Royal Norwegian Air Force Base Bardufoss.

Joint Helicopter Command personnel were hopeful that they could successfully train and complete environmental qualifications in the Arctic Winter and to learn how to live and operate in one of the world’s most hostile environments where temperatures can fall to -30°C, according to a news release from the RAF..

“The survival and operational training ensure that UK military personnel can operate globally to protect the UK’s interests, particularly alongside NATO and partner Nations. Cooperation and interoperability enable the projection of lethal force and also an ability to sustain deployments.

Once arctic training is complete, the Joint Helicopter Force’s Apache will be staying on in Norway to take part in another exercise involving 20,000 personnel from 14 countries.”

Avatar photo
George has a degree in Cyber Security from Glasgow Caledonian University and has a keen interest in naval and cyber security matters and has appeared on national radio and television to discuss current events. George is on Twitter at @geoallison
Subscribe
Notify of
guest

20 Comments
oldest
newest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments

Jonathan
Jonathan (@guest_789716)
3 months ago

The C17 is a profoundly use useful capability that very few nations have…heavy strategic airlift is profoundly important….

klonkie
klonkie (@guest_789891)
3 months ago
Reply to  Jonathan

Spot on Jonathan👌

Chris
Chris (@guest_789949)
3 months ago
Reply to  Jonathan

The French learned this lesson the hard way.

Jonathan
Jonathan (@guest_790068)
3 months ago
Reply to  Chris

Indeed they did…

Levi Goldsteinberg
Levi Goldsteinberg (@guest_790109)
3 months ago
Reply to  Chris

They’ve totally neglected sea logistics and heavy air lift

klonkie
klonkie (@guest_789890)
3 months ago

The c17 is an excellent asset. With the reduction in transport aircraft , the RAF should have a word with US to acquire say another 4 used/second hand C17S.
I’d be happy to leave the A400 fleet at 22 units.

John Clark
John Clark (@guest_789898)
3 months ago
Reply to  klonkie

Absolutely agree, though I think the A400 fleet should be increased by 8 to replace the lost C130 capability.

Andrew
Andrew (@guest_789939)
3 months ago
Reply to  klonkie

I don’t think the US Airforce have any spare c17’s…

Frank
Frank (@guest_789965)
3 months ago
Reply to  klonkie

More of both would be better, the Atlas is pretty amazing too.

Chris
Chris (@guest_790181)
3 months ago
Reply to  Frank

It should have been built as a turbofan like the C-17, with engines from the A320/737 series for cost and parts availability. The French had to Frenchicize it, with exotic, unnecessary turboprop developments.

Frank
Frank (@guest_789964)
3 months ago

Santa’s getting serious this year ! …. Looking forward to seeing Georges article about Typhoons escorting heavily armed Apache’s….. 😄

Graham Moore
Graham Moore (@guest_790026)
3 months ago

One or several Apaches transported?

Frank
Frank (@guest_790154)
3 months ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

I believe it’s two due to their length but a C17 could carry 7 or 8 in weight.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore (@guest_790197)
3 months ago
Reply to  Frank

My comment related to both Apache and Apaches being referred to in the article. Seems odd for just one Apache to be on an exercise.

Frank
Frank (@guest_790297)
3 months ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Oh…. well I just saw the Transported bit and assumed you were asking how many a C17 could carry….. sorry, I don’t know how many will be taking part.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore (@guest_790322)
3 months ago
Reply to  Frank

Thanks Frank. I had a flight in a C-17 coming back from Afghan back in 2009. Awesome size when you have been used to Hercs.

Frank
Frank (@guest_790327)
3 months ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Nice experience to have, especially coming home from there…. I’d love a trip on one, and a Galaxy ….

Mark F
Mark F (@guest_790078)
3 months ago

Yes, an excellent Heavy Lift Asset, but I suspect that all the travels in and out of the Sand Pit probably added a considerable amount of hours to the air-frames than originally factored in.
Anyone with some knowledge able to confirm or deny this.

Exroyal.
Exroyal. (@guest_790311)
3 months ago
Reply to  Mark F

Not sure about the hours on our ones or the US. Probably similar. For years on ADSB there has been a constant bus service of C17 from US to Germany and the Gulf. You see them cross the coast near Glasgow then out over just above Hull to the Wash.
US has bigger fleet but further to go. US is a big country geographically. You take into account bases in Alaska, the Pacific and the far east. It’s a lot of air miles.

Exroyal.
Exroyal. (@guest_790312)
3 months ago
Reply to  Mark F

I also know as it was being introduced in the US the planned per annum hours was 1000. The US normally has SLEP for all aircraft. I have not seen that for the C17. Others may know better. C5 certainly has a SLEP. If there is one it would make sense to me we piggy back on it.