Typhoon jets and a Voyager tanker have arrived in Oman for Exercise MAGIC CARPET, an annual bilateral exercise between the UK and Oman.

The Royal Air Force say here that the Typhoons of II (AC) Squadron RAF Lossiemouth and 12 Squadron RAF Coningsby, and a Voyager from RAF Brize Norton with over 300 RAF support personnel have now started the two-week exercise.

“The RAF will be working with the RAF of Oman to deliver air-to-ground and air-to-air refuelling training to RAF and Omani pilots. The Exercise strengthens the RAF’s role as a key partner for Oman, demonstrates its ability to deploy world class capabilities and deliver high quality training opportunities. 

This bilateral, multi-domain exercise, while not unique, provides further evidence of the United Kingdom’s integrated approach to defence and foreign policy and the UK’s enduring commitment to working with Oman and Gulf partners on promoting regional security and stability.”

The Detachment Commander and Officer Commanding II (AC) Squadron was quoted as saying:

“During the two-week exercise we will be conducting challenging flying missions together with our Omani colleagues, continuing to build on our close longstanding relationship with Oman.  We are working together very much as equal partners in the relationship. Integrating every element of our operations from planning to briefing, flying and debriefing.

There are many opportunities to learn and develop from our collective experience. We have received a warm welcome from our Omani hosts and look forward to our opportunities to socialise together after work as well.”

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Mark
Mark
4 days ago

So how many typhoons have we sent over?

Challenger
Challenger
4 days ago
Reply to  Mark

Yeah how many aircraft took part. The press releases from the MoD never actually say!

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
4 days ago
Reply to  Mark

Between 8-10 would be the norm for such an exercise.

Phylyp
Phylyp
4 days ago

> to deliver air-to-ground and air-to-air refuelling training

What does air-to-ground refuelling entail? Filling fast jets from a tanker aircraft, whilst on the ground?

Watcherzero
Watcherzero
4 days ago
Reply to  Phylyp

Air to ground attacks Just worded badly?

Phylyp
Phylyp
3 days ago
Reply to  Watcherzero

Cheers. I wasn’t sure if it was ground pounding, or something to actually do with refuelling (like hot refuelling). Your comment makes more sense.

Joe16
Joe16
3 days ago
Reply to  Phylyp

I’m sure WatchZero has it right, and it is worded badly.
For true “air to ground refuelling” I’m currently imagining a Voyager with a particularly long hose flying circuits around the top of each aircraft to keep the drogue stable in the centre of the circle near the ground, the ground crew can then plug it into the Typhoon on the ground.

farouk
farouk
4 days ago

I’m just waiting for some wonk to become offended at the name of the excercise, Talking of offensive, it seems some have taken offense at the British legion for this tweet
https://twitter.com/PoppyLegion/status/1457983549454307331?s=20

Last edited 4 days ago by farouk
Airborne
Airborne
4 days ago
Reply to  farouk

Mate some people want to see any perceived offence or slight, where none is ever intended, no matter what the message means. Armed forces community, the key is in the name, it’s remembering all those who fought for, on behalf, or using this island as a location, to fight for themselves and us! These Twitter clowns are just that, clowns, hence why I don’t bother with Twitter, far to many keyboard specials cutting about. Cheers F.

Klonkie
Klonkie
4 days ago
Reply to  Airborne

Hi Airborne – how true. My current favourite being people who are offended on behalf of other people , like they were actually asked to.

Anyhow, enough of my moaning. Let’s take a moment at 11am to remember those lost in WW1 &2. I’ll be thinking of my late father who served in Italy in in 44/45 with the 6th SA armoured division.

Airborne
Airborne
4 days ago
Reply to  Klonkie

They are sad people but they can be offended and demonstrate their “offended” views ONLY due to the fact of the bravery and effort put in by everyone who faced up to absolute tyrant, from all nations. It’s thanks to courageous people like your late father, that they can do so, a fact they do seem to forget. Respect to your father and family mate, all are in my thoughts on remembrance.

Klonkie
Klonkie
4 days ago
Reply to  Airborne

cheers and thank you Mate- all the best

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
3 days ago
Reply to  Klonkie

I like to think we remember all those we lost in any war or conflict, not just in the world wars.

Lusty
Lusty
4 days ago
Reply to  Airborne

There’s a reason why this is one of my favourite images from the period:

ww2-poster-british-commonwealth-nations-14412659.jpg
Airborne
Airborne
4 days ago
Reply to  Lusty

Agreed lusty! Great image, portrays a meaning of equality and effort to achieve the aim!

Lusty
Lusty
3 days ago
Reply to  Airborne

Exactly!

Klonkie
Klonkie
4 days ago
Reply to  Lusty

thanks Lusty- the true embodiment of diversity and inclusion .

Klonkie
Klonkie
4 days ago
Reply to  Klonkie

P.S. Lusty, have you managed to creep into RAF Marham and change the sign to RNAS Marham yet?

Lusty
Lusty
3 days ago
Reply to  Klonkie

Agreed – and no, not yet. 😉

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
1 day ago
Reply to  Lusty

Just zap the new Tornado gate guardian with a ‘Fly Navy’ sticker will do 😄

Lusty
Lusty
1 minute ago
Reply to  Robert Blay.

😂

OldSchool
OldSchool
3 days ago
Reply to  Lusty

Great pic Lusty. I’m always very proud of how the Old Empire soldiered together thru its history thick and thin. The last two figures in the line remind us of the racial diversity in our Forces and their loyalty. I recall reading HW Tilmans remark how when trekking in Garwhal/India in the 1930s ( and a WW1 veteran himself) how the old soldiers of the Garwhal Regt were always the most helpful and proud of their army service. And of course there were many many others over many years. Bless all our servicemen and women from all our nations both… Read more »

Lusty
Lusty
3 days ago
Reply to  OldSchool

I completely agree.

julian1
julian1
3 days ago
Reply to  Lusty

fantastic

Joe16
Joe16
3 days ago
Reply to  farouk

I’m struggling to understand what they’re offended by? I suppose that it’d be good to highlight more veterans from the commonwealth to reinforce that it’s a memorial of all who fought, but I think the RBL make that as clear as possible.

Lusty
Lusty
3 days ago
Reply to  Joe16

Tbh, I’m at a loss as well. Veterans and serving members of our armed forces who are citizens of the Commonwealth or are anything other than white British have been criminally under-represented for generations now. It’s almost like the ‘all in it together’ message has been lost over the years. We need to tell their stories – and not just those from conflicts fought many decades ago, but more recent conflicts too. HK laundrymen, Afghan translators and Gurkhas all spring to mind. The people complaining about it seem to forget that people of many ethnicities and religious beliefs fought for… Read more »

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
3 days ago

Lest We Forget. On November 7th, 1920, in strictest secrecy, four unidentified British bodies were exhumed from temporary battlefield cemeteries at Ypres, Arras, the Asine and the Somme. None of the soldiers who did the digging was told why. The bodies were taken by field ambulance to GHQ at St-Pol-Sur-Ter Noise. Once there, the bodies were draped with the union flag. Sentries were posted and Brigadier-General Wyatt and Colonel Gell selected one body at random. The other three were reburied. A French Honour Guard was selected and stood by the coffin overnight of the chosen soldier. On the morning of… Read more »

Unknown Warrior.jpg
Lusty
Lusty
3 days ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

If I may, it was HMS VERDUN that carried the unknown warrior, escorted by SIX(!) battleships. Perhaps an obvious choice for the duty given the name. HMS Vernon was a stone frigate, and she wasn’t sailing anywhere.

But yes, the Unknown Warrior’s history is fascinating. He was buried along with soil from the major battlefields of the war. His tombstone was engraved with brass from munitions that were melted down, on Belgian marble. A lot of thought went into the symbolism of the memorial.