NATO’s advanced anti-submarine warfare exercise, Dynamic Mongoose, will begin on the 13th of June 2022 in the North Atlantic.

In a release, NATO say that the exercise will see the participation of Sailors and Airmen from nine NATO nations: Canada, Denmark, France, Germany, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, United Kingdom and the United States including 3 submarines, 11 surface ships and 16 Maritime Patrol Aircraft.

“Dynamic Mongoose is an exercise held in the Norwegian Sea every summer, where surface ships, submarines, as well as aircraft and personnel converge for anti-submarine warfare training. The aim of Dynamic Mongoose is to provide all participants with complex, realistic and challenging warfare training to enhance their interoperability and proficiency in anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare disciplines, while maintaining focus on safety. 

During the exercise, submarines will take turns hunting and being hunted, closely coordinating their efforts with the air and surface participants. Led by Allied Maritime Command, the long-planned exercise will also demonstrate the readiness and mobility of the maritime element of the Very High Readiness Joint Task Force (VJTF), the spearhead of the NATO Response Force (NRF).”

“These exercises are designed to gain experience, enhance teamwork, and improve knowledge of the operating area strengthening the NATO Alliance’s interoperability,” Commander, Submarines NATO U.S. Navy Rear Admiral Stephen Mack said.

“They will take place in the expansive waters of the GIUK Gap between Iceland and Norway, demonstrating NATO’s ability operate in the area, including our role in maintaining freedom of navigation for the international maritime community.”

Units participating in the exercise will pull into Reykjavik, Iceland on the 9th of June.

George has a degree in Cyber Security from Glasgow Caledonian University and has a keen interest in naval and cyber security matters and has appeared on national radio and television to discuss current events. He also works for the NHS. George is on Twitter at @geoallison
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Steve M
Steve M
3 days ago

Is this a new US super asset? https://globe.adsbexchange.com/?icao=ae1591

AlexS
AlexS
2 days ago
Reply to  Steve M

Why?

Steve M
Steve M
2 days ago
Reply to  AlexS

click on the history then click on pink part of track…………….I’ve never seen a UK apache fly at altitude/speed that this US one can…..😀

AlexS
AlexS
2 days ago
Reply to  Steve M

Missed it 🙂

Darren hall
Darren hall
2 days ago
Reply to  Steve M

Does seem a wee bit high for an Apache… Perhaps its inside a bigbird!!

Steve M
Steve M
2 days ago
Reply to  Darren hall

I’ve not seen a big bird (don’t think can fit one in Concorde?) that can do 830Kts at 32k Feet

Last edited 2 days ago by Steve M
Darren hall
Darren hall
2 days ago
Reply to  Steve M

Perhaps its Airwolf!!

Daveyb
Daveyb
2 days ago
Reply to  Steve M

Ground speed is not the same as airspeed. Its possible the Apache was in a strong tail wind, which will give you a high ground speed. I was in a Chinook once going to Ireland, where the ground speed reached 300 knots. This was due to a gale force wind pushing the aircraft. Airspeed still read 150 knots.

Steve M
Steve M
2 days ago
Reply to  Daveyb

At 07:46Z it shows 833kts at 32k’ and then goes to 583kts at 38k’ according Boeing never exceed speed is 197kts and service ceialing is 20k’ so unless there was a localised tornado wind funnel not sure i’ve ever seen 400kt tail wind 😂

Daveyb
Daveyb
2 days ago
Reply to  Steve M

Wow, I didn’t read it that closely to be honest. I think somebody is pretending to be somebody else.

eclipse
eclipse
2 days ago
Reply to  Daveyb

Pretending to be someone else…?

Daveyb
Daveyb
2 days ago
Reply to  eclipse

You can recode AIS to be something else.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
2 days ago
Reply to  Steve M

Oooh mate, this needs looking into.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
2 days ago

I wonder if France will be testing their new class of submarines in this exercise? Australia will be looking to follow suit! French Navy commissions first Barracuda submarine06 JUNE 2022 “French shipbuilder Naval Group is building six Barracuda next-generation SSNs under a contract awarded in December 2006. The Suffren class is intended to progressively replace the French Navy’s ageing fleet of five remaining Rubis Améthyste-class SSNs.” https://www.janes.com/defence-news/naval-weapons/latest/french-navy-commissions-first-barracuda-submarine Incoming Australian defence minister to focus on sovereign submarine capability02 JUNE 2022 “Australia’s intention to acquire at least eight nuclear-powered submarines from either the United States or the United Kingdom under the auspices… Read more »

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker
2 days ago

Sounds like a good exercise. I wonder what ships will be deployed and what subs? I think we can assume P-8 aircraft from the U.K., Norway, USA perhaps a P3 from Canada. Do the Netherlands, Portugal, Denmark have maritime aircraft just now?
A variety of subs could be on show. Lost Angeles, Virginia, seawolf(doubtful), walrus, rubis, barracuda, astute, type 212 and Portugal and Norway subs(can’t remember names). Pick 3 and the winner gets a prize.

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker
2 days ago
Reply to  Monkey spanker

Haha lost Angeles. They one that got away

AlexS
AlexS
1 day ago
Reply to  Monkey spanker

Portugal have P3 and C-295 – last one is maritime patrol only , don’t think it has ASW items besides the radar/FLIR/ESM.
Submarine are based on Type 214.

Last edited 1 day ago by AlexS
Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker
1 day ago
Reply to  AlexS

Ahh. Portugal could be forgiven for not putting any effort into defence. They must feel safe minus the coastline but they still have an ok defence for there size. Nice country.