MV-22B Osprey aircraft with the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit, Iwo Jima Amphibious Ready Group, landed on HMS Queen Elizabeth earlier.

The U.S. Marine Corps say thatr the 24th MEU transported Marines and equipment assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 211 on HMS Queen Elizabeth’s Carrier Strike Group.

“The Navy-Marine Corps team is humbled and proud to represent the United States and serve alongside our UK counterparts.”

What is the Carrier Strike Group doing?

HMS Queen Elizabeth and her Carrier Strike Group are currently exercising alongside allied nations in and around the Scottish islands as part of the massive Strike Warrior exercise.

The Royal Navy say that Exercise Strike Warrior will involve more than 20 warships, three submarines and 150 aircraft from 11 nations and is a final test for the Carrier Strike Group ahead of its first operational deployment to the Mediterranean, Indian Ocean and Asia Pacific.

“The exercise, which will run for two weeks, will see the task group pitted against warships from NATO’s Standing Maritime Group 1 in waters off north-west Scotland to prove it is capable of undertaking high intensity operations against the most demanding adversaries. The culmination of Strike Warrior will see the Carrier Strike Group certified ready for deployment, at which point operational command will pass from the Royal Navy’s Fleet Commander, Vice Admiral Jerry Kyd, to the Chief of Joint Operations, Vice Admiral Sir Ben Key.”

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Ron
Ron
1 month ago

I would love to hear what the USMC really think about the QE or for that matter what the RN staff think about the capabilities of the MV-22.

fearlesstunafish
fearlesstunafish
1 month ago
Reply to  Ron

definately…..really hoping we get some articles in that vein in the course of this deployment!

Crabfat
Crabfat
1 month ago

Mother of God – look at the spelling – “definately” – fearlesstunafish is ‘H’!!!

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
1 month ago
Reply to  Ron

Quite a lot by all accounts.

Geoff Baker
Geoff Baker
1 month ago

I think the 7 month global deployment will be an interesting exercise, the USMC have been directly involved in the development of the QEC carriers so they will be interested to see it put into practice. As to articles i think you will get a few official ones the joint exercises, but i think the USN will ensure they focus on the achievements and joint exercises and play down on the life aboard. I think the BBC documentary next year will probably cover that better. Privately official reports will probably be generated for how to conduct future operations with the… Read more »

dan
dan
1 month ago
Reply to  Ron

I’m sure the Marines love the fact that British ships aren’t “dry.” lol

Geoff Baker
Geoff Baker
1 month ago
Reply to  dan

That is going to be interesting how the USMC will manage that, they cant make drinking off limits to the US crew with the RN crew making full use of the mess, So after a 7 month cruise those crews are likely to find their next USN deployment rather disappointing LOL

Jack
Jack
1 month ago

I wonder if this is a way for the US to demonstrate to the RN the benefit of having these rather than simply operating them. If the Royal Marines are to return to their raiding roots, surely the speed and range of the Osprey would ideally suit them.

DaveyB
DaveyB
1 month ago
Reply to  Jack

Yes, but the aircraft is now over 30 years old, blooming expensive and very maintenance heavy. I suspect the USMC will go will the Bell V280 Valor over the Defiant to replace their UH-1Y Hueys. The Valor has a much higher cruise speed and nearly twice the range of Sikorsky’s Defiant, so can keep up with an Osprey. Bell have promised that the asking price will be competitive and that maintenance will be much lower. The Valor is the aircraft I see replacing our Merlins in the near future. If Bell win the US Army contract along with the USMC… Read more »

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
1 month ago
Reply to  DaveyB

I agree for all their abilities the Osprey would be a pile of trouble financially and maintenance wise. Valor seems like a better more realistic bet and probably would suit the Marines needs better in potential operations while fulfilling other needs too in replacing more run of the mill operations the fleet and army need.

Pacman27
Pacman27
1 month ago
Reply to  DaveyB

I am a long term supporter of the V22 but have to say I believe the Defiant will wing against the Valor and that the UK should hang fire and replace all its non chinook/apache fleets with the defiant. The reason I have been turned around is that the defiant gives all the benefits of a normal helicopter, but with the speed and range of the V22. Support and training costs are likely to be less and most importantly the uk could order 400 of these at a very sensible price and reap the rewards of mass standardisation over a… Read more »

DaveyB
DaveyB
1 month ago
Reply to  Pacman27

I agree in some respects, the Defiant will provide a better battlefield support helicopter for the Army, as it will be nimbler, especially at low level flying. Whether it will be easier to maintain will be debatable. The main rotor gearbox and rotors will be under a lot more stress than the Valor’s prop-rotors. As they have to provide both lift and thrust (up to a certain speed). I can foresee issues with the rotors due to the speeds they will have to sustain over their lifespan. This is because Sikorsky can’t slow the rotor speed down, as the rotors… Read more »

Glass Half Full
Glass Half Full
1 month ago
Reply to  DaveyB

Seems like USAF may be aiming a little higher than just leveraging Valor for a V-22 replacement, with some intriguing technical capabilities per link below. From the article “…the US Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC) said it was looking ahead for a VTOL aircraft with “jet speeds” to replace its Bell Boeing CV-22 Osprey tiltrotor.”

I doubt they would be interested in what’s illustrated, but those are just concept outline diagrams that probably bear little resemblance to what would result from a new design.

https://www.flightglobal.com/helicopters/us-air-force-signs-research-contract-for-bells-high-speed-vtol/143611.article

TrevorH
TrevorH
1 month ago
Reply to  Jack

Well according to an earlier ukdj article, the Osprey costs twice to run and carries half the troops of a Chinook.
Hmmm…
Osprey is faster and longer range. But is that the key? I mean do you want troops on a limb, 400 miles away?

The other point is… Well, what is intended. Raiding or Assault. What is the difference? And once we have determined what we are doing, what do we need to do it with?

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
1 month ago
Reply to  TrevorH

Exactly the simple fact is we really don’t have the capacity to use them to their strengths even if we could afford them raiding is going to be the priority over assault the latter would only be done in accompaniment with allies and in that case best to combine our elite troops with US Ospreys if required with all the support from US support assets they really require to be used to their advantage. Ultimately less ultimately capable (where we can’t exploit it much) but more useful (where we do) and more affordable and flexible over all is the better… Read more »

Martyn Parker
Martyn Parker
1 month ago
Reply to  Jack

It would cost well over a £1 billion just for a fleet of 7, what do you prefer, the Type 31 program or a few Ospreys?

Dern
Dern
1 month ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

We’ve got Argus for now. Better keep going with that as a Auxilliary Aviation ship and get a purpose build design when she needs replacing than get some sort of weird half LPD, half replenishment tanker, half auxilliary aviation hybrid that we already have most of the functions covered by other platforms.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
1 month ago

No, we cannot have any!

Herodotus
Herodotus
1 month ago

Oooh…go on…you nasty beast 😊

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
1 month ago
Reply to  Herodotus

😜

captain p wash
captain p wash
1 month ago

We won’t get any either. Way too expensive, We’ll just invite the USMC …. oh hang on, what a great Idea, lets not buy anymore F35’s either ! 😂

John Hartley
John Hartley
1 month ago

DM, sadly you are right. Being old enough to remember 1982, I can recall the problem of connecting with the fleet once it was beyond helicopter range of Ascension Island. My wish list still has 5 CMV-22B for the FAA, for that 1100 mile ship to shore connector.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
1 month ago
Reply to  John Hartley

In a world with money no object of course.

Til then, its extended range Chinooks or go without. Cost not worth it for the extra it brings. 1 billion buys lots of Blackhawk, for example, or T31, or Protectors, or dare I say more Merlins!!!!

John Hartley
John Hartley
1 month ago

The latest AW101 with the uprated engines, can reach out to 900-925 miles, which is getting close to the 1100 miles of CMV-22B. Fully equipped CMV-22B with the initial spares package cost $105 million each, so $525m for my fantasy 5.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
1 month ago
Reply to  John Hartley

Oh, cheaper than I thought. But still ridiculously pricy.

Martyn Parker
Martyn Parker
1 month ago
Reply to  John Hartley

You can then add in the cost of setting up maintenance lines and training the cost begins to rise extremely rapidly

John Hartley
John Hartley
1 month ago
Reply to  Martyn Parker

True, but that applies to any aircraft you buy.

Martyn Parker
Martyn Parker
1 month ago
Reply to  John Hartley

But why add the extra cost and infrastructure problems for a new type with negligible benefits when we are already committed to a different solution to the problem? It makes zero sense

John Hartley
John Hartley
1 month ago
Reply to  Martyn Parker

Staying in contact with the carrier group, may make zero sense to you, but it makes a lot of sense to me.

Martyn Parker
Martyn Parker
1 month ago
Reply to  John Hartley

You might think it’s worth losing the T31 or T32 fleet so that the mail can be delivered 200 miles further out to sea but I doubt many sane people would agree with you thankfully

John Hartley
John Hartley
1 month ago
Reply to  Martyn Parker

I am old enough to have seen, Labour, Conservative & Coalition Governments all claim to have no money, yet by magic they find billions for their pet projects. Those projects fail & are swept under the carpet, with no one held to account. It is an old trick to say that to have Peter you will need to rob Paul. Those of us with grey hair have heard it too many times for it to be credible.
Re CMV-22B. Its not just mail, but missing spare parts & crewmen with a needed skillset, without which the carrier group is compromised.

Paulo
Paulo
1 month ago

Would the MV-22 be a good AWAC platform using the Ericsson’s system.

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
1 month ago
Reply to  Paulo

UCAV is the future for carrier AEW.

Paulo Amante
Paulo Amante
1 month ago
Reply to  Robert Blay.

For sure but still needs to be a VSTOL platform for the likes of the UK and other navies.

DaveyB
DaveyB
1 month ago
Reply to  Paulo

If you talking about the sketch they did a while back with the triangular radome on the roof. It will suffer the same issues as the Hawkeye, namely the fuselage will obstruct the downwards view. The prop-rotors will need filtering out to prevent shuttering. One of the trials they did do about 20 years ago now, was to mount the radar from a Viking on the ramp. That then lowered further, below the aircraft so it had a clear view downwards. It failed miserably as they didn’t account for the ramp vibrating, which caused the radar to fail. One other… Read more »

Paulo Amante
Paulo Amante
1 month ago
Reply to  DaveyB

Hi DaveyB yes I was thinking of the AESA panels mounted on the aircraft and as an alternative to the Merlin Crowsnest option. But I understand that the Merlin Crowsnest was already a budget decision back in 2015 and I am sure has the same operating height as the Osprey while the Osprey would have a real advantage in terms of range and speed and probably in terms of system performance as the AESA system would have more range and sensitivity vs the existing option of Thales upgrade of the Cerberus radar system used by the Sea King ASaC.7 helicopters… Read more »

DaveyB
DaveyB
1 month ago
Reply to  Paulo Amante

Leonardo have developed the AESA Osprey radar. This a modular radar where you can additional panels to suit your requirement. Such as using four to give you a 360 degree view. It operates in the X band and has a published detection range of 200nm (370km). However, they don’t state the size of the target so it may be comparable to the Searchwater 2000 in performance. The Italian Navy are looking at this as a replacement for their HEW-784/APS-748E equipped Merlins. It has been plagued with issues, ranging from reliability to detection resolution. It replaces the standard under nose radar… Read more »

Paul.P
Paul.P
1 month ago

Carrier on board delivery, Merlin and Crowsnest successor, F-35B carrier refuelling? Look no further…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y9633v6U0wo

The Artist Formerly Known as Los Pollos Chicken
The Artist Formerly Known as Los Pollos Chicken
1 month ago

2 of these bad boys flew over me garden low this evening at 1650 hrs here on the north east coast (that’s far far away from weegieland 🚽💩for our wee pals doon sooth) 👍🏻

magnific they are most impressive in real life , I thought seeing Apaches that flew over a few months back were a sight but man these bad boys 👏🏻 A great shame HM didn’t invest for the RN . Not sure if they had been at Leuchars ? Or direct from US ship at sea?

🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿🇬🇧

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
1 month ago

Can Condor in Arbroath take helis?

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
1 month ago

Was an old airfield so assume so.

Pete
Pete
1 month ago

Blast from past. Been up in a glider out of Condor.

Lusty
Lusty
1 month ago

Look, Daniele. An Osprey and a bagger in their natural habitat.

It would be nice to have them, but I would rather focus on the projects in the pipeline. Buying some would cost a small fortune, not to mention the added requirements of training air crews, ground crews, and the additional training for operating from the carriers… all for what would likely be a small order.

Extended-range chinooks will suffice, and hopefully, the plans for a new type of helicopter will add some much needed volume to our rotary wing fleet.

geoff
geoff
1 month ago

Are the MV-22s staying on board for the deployment ???

Geoff Baker
Geoff Baker
1 month ago
Reply to  geoff

I don’t think so or we would have seen a definite detachment, plus with the 7 Merlin’s of 820 (Pingers & Baggies) and 18 F-35B they don’t really have hanger space for a dedicated V-22 flight as well. Even the Merlin HC4s are located onboard Fort Victoria for the deployment.

Mr Bell
Mr Bell
1 month ago
Reply to  Geoff Baker

The QE can fit upto 50 aircraft. So 18 F35B and say a dozen Merlin still leaves space for Osprey if they were needed on the deployment. The QE class was designed with a wide enough margin to take current and predicted aircraft and UAVs.
Osprey could easily come along if the USMC and RN wanted them.

geoff
geoff
1 month ago
Reply to  geoff

Good Morning geoff. This is geoff and just to confirm that you are not me!!😆 Please can you change your user name seeing I was here first and have been for a few years. Cheers mate

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
1 month ago
Reply to  geoff

There are geoffs. Then there is THE geoff. 😀

geoff
geoff
1 month ago

Hahaha Daniele-Aw shucks, my face is red with embarrassment!

‘Geoff the First’ perhaps🤔

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
1 month ago
Reply to  geoff

Haha! You’re fine mate.
Weather forecaster geoff?
I liked the “UKDJ Africa correspondent” one best. 😁

Lepke
Lepke
1 month ago

Too bad there’s no longer a rum ration. The marines would have enjoyed that.

Simon
Simon
1 month ago

I saw two of these flying side by side over the Yorkshire dales yesterday looked impressive very slow and noisy but impressive