Being rolled out for use on front-line operations around the world, the Commando Raiding Craft (CRC) is a redesigned version of the tried-and-tested Offshore Raiding Craft – commonly known in the Corps as the ORC.

The service say in a news release that after two decades’ service with the Royal Marines around the globe, it’s been given an overhaul to meet the demands of the commandos in the mid-21st century as they return to their WW2 raiding roots: coastal landings behind enemy lines with small teams wreaking havoc on enemy infrastructure and systems.

“Repainted in grey to help concealment, the CRC also has new engines providing increased range – more than 200 nautical miles – and speed – up to 40 knots – and a new configuration with driving position moved from the back to front for better manoeuvrability. It also has new cooling systems, mast, trim for better protection from sea conditions and a sophisticated electronic suite for communications and navigation.

The CRC has three crew who rotate on long journeys but also space to launch drones, carry payloads and to store a smaller Inshore Raiding Craft to deploy on some landings if required. Crucially, this is a life extension and upgrade to the ORC and, although it is more than just a stop-gap, in the long run Commando Forces are developing a boat that will replace the ORC, CRC and larger Landing Craft Vehicle Personnel.”

Plymouth-based 47 Commando – the amphibious warfare experts of the Commando Force – will be at the controls of the CRC wherever it deploys around the globe.

The unit’s Commanding Officer, Colonel William Norcott, said:

“The CRC is multi-purpose and more supportive of the Commando Force model, working in small disaggregated teams that are structured to deliver a lethal punch. You can configure the craft to the way these teams are operating. This is exciting for us, because it’s a much more powerful craft, the coxswains will tell you, it’s much more enjoyable to operate, it’s more tactical and we don’t need the different variants like we currently have. We are really excited to have something that does what it says on the tin.”

In the meantime, CRC is already deployed on operations – namely with 47 Commando’s 539 Raiding Squadron and the Littoral Response Group (South) task force in the Mediterranean.

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George has a degree in Cyber Security from Glasgow Caledonian University and has a keen interest in naval and cyber security matters and has appeared on national radio and television to discuss current events. George is on Twitter at @geoallison
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David Barry
David Barry
15 days ago

I never abseiled from a helicopter;
I never went on one of these craft.

Bucket list moment.

And before Airborne asks, no, I don’t want to jump out of an aeroplane capable of landing.

geoff.Roach
geoff.Roach
15 days ago
Reply to  David Barry

I’ve done a ride in a Wessex, a platform jump and a cliff abseil. Does that count?🙄

Ian M
Ian M
15 days ago
Reply to  David Barry

Puma and Gazelle deployments and FF parachuting. Can’t stand cold water, so rigid raiders etc are NOT on my bucket list, although whale watching in a one piece survival suit was just about tolerable.
All respect to these guys😎

Frank
Frank
15 days ago
Reply to  David Barry

I’m a member of the 200mph club (two wheels) if that’s any good ?

farouk
farouk
15 days ago
Reply to  Frank

👍
You’ve done Jasper Carrot proud.

David Barry
David Barry
15 days ago
Reply to  Frank

Naw, screw that, I’m a member of the iconic, stylish ride and have been for over 41 years.

Vespa P200E.

Lambourghini driver pulled up at the petrol station at Newby Bridge, Cumbria, and was looking at my P2… “You can’t afford it!” Left him speechless.

farouk
farouk
15 days ago
Reply to  David Barry

David Berry wrote: “”I never abseiled from a helicopter;”” I have, a number of times just try not to be the last man in the queue, because if the Pilot isn’t that clued up, as the helicopter becomes lighter , they do have a habit of gaining height and I have seen the last man having to drop a good few feet because of that. ““I never went on one of these craft.”” I trained as a Combat Support Boat Operator and it’s a blast. Just be prepared to get wet. Its why I never wore boots on the boat… Read more »

David Barry
David Barry
15 days ago
Reply to  farouk

You’re making me envious and upset now 😉

Gunbuster
Gunbuster
13 days ago
Reply to  farouk

Rapid Roped from Lynx and Seaking.
Been out in 539 ORCs and LCVP and LCUs
I also jumped from a perfectly serviceable aircraft on AT at Netheravon…

Steve
Steve
15 days ago

Wouldn’t putting the driving position at the front be a negative, if these crafts came under fire? Surely if the driver or the drive unit was hit your going to likely lose everyone on the craft.

Frank
Frank
15 days ago
Reply to  Steve

Being such small craft, it probably makes no difference where the Driver sits…..

Steve
Steve
15 days ago
Reply to  Frank

You would have the other crew members in the way. Not ideal but losing one soldier is better than all, plus wouldn’t you want a forward facing machine gun for a raiding craft.