Zulu Company from 45 Commando, based at Arbroath in Scotland, are to be the first on the ground should the Royal Marines be called on to deal with a chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear (CBRN) incident.

Exercise Toxic Dagger is the second major chemical and nuclear warfare workout for the Royal Marines inside 12 months.

Military and civilian specialists from the Defence Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear Centre at Westdown Camp on Salisbury Plain helped the Royal Marines perfect their skills, according to a news release.

“After a week in the classroom learning about the latest threats and how to deal with them both practically and in planning a co-ordinated response, the marines moved on to a week of practical training – called Exercise Toxic Dagger – which culminated in an all-out attack on Imber village, testing all they had learned.”

According to reports, the final assault incorporated pyrotechnic and electronic battle simulators to make the experience as real as possible.

“The recent attack on British soil highlighted the importance of this capability and it is more important than ever for us to be able to operate effectively in this environment should the need arise,” said Sergeant Ben Fail from the Defence Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear Centre.

9 COMMENTS

  1. Olé zooma zooma zooma
    Olé zooma zooma chief
    Drink it down you Zulu warrior
    Drink it down you Zulu chief
    Drink it down you Zulu warrior
    Drink it down you Zulu chief, chief, chief!

  2. Wasn’t it the RAF regiment that was the specialists in this area?, anyway great that the RM commandos have yet another skill that might be needed one day.

    Do the Marines in Arbroath have access to their boats and craft for training around Arbroath waters?

    • Yes, its a good point.

      RAF Regiment 20 Wing. Also known as DCBRN Wing, including 27 Sqn.

      They and other small units from the Royal Signals and Royal Engineers form the TRF “Technical Response Force” which responds to terrorist incidents of that nature and support NARO too.

      The role is due to pass back to the army after the 2010 SDSR cock up of removing the JNBC Regiment at Honington.

      28 Regiment RE will be taking the role, I assume joined by Falcon Sqn RTR.

      Interestingly 45 Commando are one of the two remaining Commando meant to provide teeth to 3 Commando Brigade. 42 are the specialists.

      So why, with those other units of the RAF Regiment and the army in role or preparing to take the role, are they using one of our elite rapid reaction units?

  3. I served in Army in late 1070s early 80s and served in Germany, was regularly having NBC (Nucular,Biological,Chemical) warfare exercises & every soldier had own NBC Suite & respirator. In heat of summer not good but the kit saves lives in that environment.I would imagine, now bulk of UK Military are back in Europe.Most, if not all will be given intense training in NBC warfare training & decontamination of personal & equipment. UK NBC clothing & respirator was the best back then & would think it probably is still today,with up dated NBC kit.

  4. I know I am pedantic but why is an article about the Royal Marines under the category of land. Does not the Royal Marines come under the control of the Royal Navy. I would not expect the RAF regt to be in the land category but air. So I would expect an article about the Marines to come under the category of sea.
    This slippage with the Royal Marines is not only here but in the media in general, due to this many think that the RM belongs to the Army and that they are soldiers, they’re not they are Marines. By getting the terminology and categorisation correct it can then be seen how much the Royal Navy actually brings to the table. It is the same with the Fleet Air Arm,if the media starts getting this wrong especially when the F35 FAA squadrons become operational people might think that they are just RAF in different uniform.

    • Sadly, isn’t that what is happening by stealth? The FAA will never really feel to the outsider that it has any ‘fighter’ aircraft. Based on an RAF station and without so much as a winged fist on on a tail. And the Royal Marines appear to have spent much of the last 20 years operating as infantry to bolster the Army. At least that’s the impression I get anyway.

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