British transport aircraft are now in their third day of delivering “thousands” of anti-tank weapons to Ukraine in the face of a massive build-up of Russian troops.

Minister James Heappey told Times Radio that the Ministry of Defence has given “thousands” of anti-armour weapons to Ukraine. According to a statement given by the Defence Secretary in the House of Commons today, the 17th of January 2022.

We have taken the decision to supply Ukraine with light, anti-armour, defensive weapon systems. A small number of UK personnel will also provide early-stage training for a short period of time, within the framework of Operation ORBITAL, before then returning to the United Kingdom. This security assistance package complements the training and capabilities that Ukraine already has, and those that are also being provided by the UK and other Allies in Europe and the United States. Ukraine has every right to defend its borders, and this new package of aid further enhances its ability to do so.

You can read the full statement here.

I was on the ground at RAF Brize Norton and photgraphed the arrival of vehicles carrying explosives to the base which were later loaded onto a C-17. An image of the arrival is shown below.

Image UKDJ.

The flights started on the 17th of January, with Royal Air Force C-17 aircraft departing RAF Brize Norton for Kiev multiple times per day, today is the third consecutive day of deliveries.

This is a screenshot of flight tracking software showing two British C-17s in flight at various part of their journeys to and from Ukraine.

Video from Ukraine even shows the aircraft being unloaded.

What weapons are being sent?

Next Generation Light Anti-Tank Weapon, or NLAW for short. The Next Generation Light Anti-Tank Weapon (NLAW) is described by its makers Saab in the following way:

“The Bofors NLAW (Next Generation Light Anti-tank Weapon) is the first ever single soldier missile system that rapidly knocks out any Main Battle Tank in just one shot by striking it from above.”

You can read more about the system from respected defence commentator ‘Think Defence’ by clicking here.

Here’s a video of the system in action.

George has a degree in Cyber Security from Glasgow Caledonian University and has a keen interest in naval and cyber security matters and has appeared on national radio and television to discuss current events. He also works for the NHS. George is on Twitter at @geoallison
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James
James
2 months ago

I’m just impressed we actually have stuff to give away, I’d love a look around these storage facilities are whats hiding in them

BB85
BB85
2 months ago
Reply to  James

I was going to say the same myself 🤣 we must be running low. I wonder if we still have Milan ATGMs for a rainy day. I’m sure they could take out an APC.
I take it we don’t publish our stock piles of NLAW, Starstreak, Javelin, 81mm mortars, Grenades and ammunition etc.

Tams
Tams
2 months ago
Reply to  BB85

I mean, we won’t need them in the short term and can easily get more if long term we did.

At least they are being put to good use. Most would likely have wasted away in storage anyway.

Quentin D63
Quentin D63
2 months ago
Reply to  BB85

What about supplying some surplus Rapiers?
Silly question, but why are we telling the Russians exactly what we’re sending? Sending ATMs is great and good on the UK but I’d also be worried about their artillery and attack helicopters and tanks. The two former will need to be effectively tackled.

Steve
Steve
2 months ago
Reply to  Quentin D63

This is more of a deterence move than a realistic hope of defending Ukraine. Russia has a massive air and artillery advantage over Ukraine and so they will pound defensive lines well before anything gets into range of these short range missiles.

I guess the hope is that by publically letting Russia know that it will be harder than they expected, might give them second thoughts.

The real question is what has the US given them.

James
James
2 months ago
Reply to  Steve

Stingers on the way from Lithuania

Roy
Roy
2 months ago
Reply to  Quentin D63

The Russian bear must be worried that a full invasion may not be a quick affair. This sort of publicity will heighten his doubts and raise the potential losses for him, on the other hand perhaps other hardware is already en route.

Tommo
Tommo
2 months ago
Reply to  James

Hope that was our stockpile of PIATs circur 1944 issue

FatDave
FatDave
2 months ago
Reply to  Tommo

You beat me to it!

Tommo
Tommo
2 months ago
Reply to  FatDave

I just Sprung into action couldn’t resist it

Paul.P
Paul.P
2 months ago

Global UK in action, exerting its influence for peace with freedom. On the one hand sending defensive weapons like NLAW but also inviting Lavrov to London for talks. Talks with the US have brought no result; Germany is no use. The EU is no use. Kudos to Ben Wallace. 👏👏

DanielMorgan
DanielMorgan
2 months ago
Reply to  Paul.P

Good Grief! Wallace is grandstanding. That’s his MO. The UK is a minor player in all of this and sending some antitank weapons to Ukraine won’t deter Putin if he decides to invade. Why would Lavrov talk with Wallace? Wallace has no power. The players here are the US, NATO, and Germany. Calculations by the Russians would most certainly come to the conclusion that the UK cannot affect the situation. It’s all fine to root for the home team but don’t get carried away and let’s deal with reality.

Anthony Chambers
Anthony Chambers
2 months ago
Reply to  DanielMorgan

The UK defence budget is the same as the Russian defence budget.

Marked
Marked
2 months ago

We should be looking to learn something from them then. Sure, not all is ideal with their forces, far from it. But they seem to have a hell of a lot more to show for their spending.

Steve
Steve
2 months ago
Reply to  Marked

can’t really compare based on budgets, since a lot of other things come into play, like relative pay of soldiers etc.

Alex
Alex
1 month ago
Reply to  Marked

A lot of old outdated stuff, the UK prefers quality not quantity.

Spartan
Spartan
2 months ago

Yes but they don’t have the incompetent UK defence procurement set up.

Graham
Graham
2 months ago

The Budgets might be the same but the forces certainly aren’t. The British have 80 tanks the Russians 15,000, the British have around 100 front line fighter Jets,the Russians over 4000, the British have only a tiny fraction of artillery,no S400,500 missiles,no hypersonic missiles,a few thousand troops, 12 navy jets, almost no troops ect…In short,the British force is tiny and would be swatted by Russia like a fly. The fact they are supplying a few anti tank missiles is nothing but propaganda to show they are supporting Nato’s aggressive expansion east to Russia’s doorstep.

sd67
sd67
2 months ago
Reply to  Graham

Please.
Russia has 2500 modern tanks of which half are facing china

The russian airforce has approx 450 su27 series ac. In both cases what is the real availability? Also note – zero 5th gen ac operational

The UK operates through ALLIANCES. Now this is a difficult concept to grasp for some. For example our close partner Poland operate 900 frontline tanks (and soon F35s). Andthey border Ukraine.

I wouldn’t underestimate poor little insignificant Britain

Airborne
Airborne
2 months ago
Reply to  sd67

Glad you replied in a little depth as I couldn’t be bothered to try to educate the uneducated!

Airborne
Airborne
2 months ago
Reply to  Graham

Oh dear, military knowledge and subject matter experience not your forte it seems.

FatDave
FatDave
2 months ago
Reply to  Graham

This doesn’t deserve a reply but sigh….

There is no aggressive NATO expansion. Merely democratic nations joining a defensive alliance because of an existential threat from Russia.

Anyone who believes otherwise is either a liar or stupid. Your call

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
2 months ago
Reply to  Graham

Britain would not plan to go to war with Russia without being part of some massive NATO effort.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
2 months ago
Reply to  Graham

Graham,

We have a declared 227 CR2 tanks out of 408 purchased. Where do you get the figure of 80 from?

Do you think Britain’s forces are going toe-to-toe with the Russians on our own??

I wouldn’t desribe NATO’s expansion eastwards to be aggressive, but it certainly rattles the Russkis.

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  DanielMorgan

Russia has indicated from its actions at the 3 meetings held last week that it is only interested in talking with the Boss, the US, not the underlings NATO. The UK is Russia’s eyes is just a poodle of the US and a badly defended one, against Russian weapons, at that. As to Global UK in action, that’s a farce if applied to the military.

AV
AV
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

You’re talking rubbish, show me the Russian carrier strike group?..

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  AV

Why would they need one? As far as I know they have no plans to attack some second or third world country. Anyway, they are not much use now against a proper foe armed with decent AShM.

AV
AV
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

You stated Global UK was a farce militarily, but as one of only 2 nations on the planet that can deploy a 5th gen CSG I disagree somewhat.

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  AV

The French might dispute that. Also it is a valid viewpoint that having a CSG is a bit of a millstone.

AV
AV
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Which 5th gen aircraft are the French currently fielding as part of their CSG?…

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  AV

Sorry I didn’t link the aircraft. They might argue that their carrier plus their aircraft would be an equal to ours.

AV
AV
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Suggest you do your homework re Charles de Gaulle v Queen Elizabeth at least…then overlay the air group comparison…and top it off with with a comparative study of ship compliment/ group make up re: CSG 21 and the French CSG.

Sean
Sean
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

You didn’t think of aircraft when discussing carrier capabilities? That’s like comparing battleships but forgetting their guns 😆

Airborne
Airborne
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Disagree as the French CDG was at certain times the only option for France to carry out offensive ops against IS from a sovereign location, without requiring overfly permission etc. And the CDG does not operate 5th Gen assets.

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Airborne

OK guys I probably got the comparison wrong, sorry.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

CSG is a millstone?? – more like an incredible strategic asset, globally deployable.

Last edited 2 months ago by Graham Moore
Airborne
Airborne
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

A proper foe? What would that be?

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Airborne

One of the increasing number of countries that have realised the potential of long range AShM both shore and air launched.

Airborne
Airborne
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Not quite that simple, as war is about evolution. Mitigation’s, TTPs and new and ongoing tech will have a solution both hard and soft kill defence, moving to a more kinetic reaction, until the next new “evolution” comes along. Military capability is about a balanced capability, and no country in the world, apart from the US at this moment, has that full spectrum.

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Airborne

You are correct but only the US and its allies have a need for full spectrum, most of the rest, including Russia, only have a need for the defensive part.

Airborne
Airborne
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Russia purely defensive? Your posts up to know have been reasonable and thought out, but including Russia in a defensive postured force only, unfortunately lets you down somewhat and maybe defines your politics.

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Airborne

That is not what I meant to say. Clearly many military assets can be used as offensive and defensive but very large amount of Russia’s military budget has gone into systems that are primarily defensive, especially their multi layer IADS with its SAMs and aircraft as well as their nuclear deterrent.

Airborne
Airborne
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Russian doctrine has always been about multi layered SAM and Arty. It’s part and parcel of the old Soviet doctrine, even when the “defensive” Soviet’s parked dozens of Rifle Divisions in Europe facing West. Situation, no change, it says nothing about any overt defensive policy on the side of Putin!

AV
AV
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

So you’re pushing a Russian defensive only agenda?…there lies your true colour my friend. Do you think us all that stupid?..

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  AV

Of course not, to both questions. My ‘colour’ is to present a view that others here might not agree with but is valid. Some of those views may be uncomfortable but that is the way of the World.

AV
AV
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Lol, a post that basically admits what we’ve all suspected…👍

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  AV

Thanks, I’ve had enough, off to bed.

AV
AV
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Yes sorry forgot you’re a few hours ahead of the UK (if not geographically, very much politically) Night night.

Sean
Sean
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Hilarious rather than uncomfortable 🤷🏻‍♂️

Sean
Sean
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

How was invading Georgia or Ukraine defensive?…

Sean
Sean
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Too busy invading first-world countries… 🤷🏻‍♂️

FatDave
FatDave
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

But they are about to attack a democratic European country

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  FatDave

That is not what they are saying in Kiev, they say that the current situation is similar to last April.

Jonathan
Jonathan
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

That John is just not true. The U.K. is as it has always been a great big European leveller. If you have significant Northern European ports and your trade or warships need to transit Northern European waters you simply have to always consider the U.K. view point as we do have a navy and airforce able deny access to the Atlantic if he UK got it in into head. You then also need to consider our other overseas assets which are in most cases significant geopolitical pieces and a nightmare to any other nation that engages in international trade. The… Read more »

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Jonathan

Thank you for your considered response and as a Brit I know exactly where you are coming from historically.   The problem as I see it is whilst we are still a top European power we are trying to behave as if we are a top World power which we no longer are. Just look at our shrinking MoD budget as an example.   Even as a top European power or strength is one sided, offence. If attacked we are effectively helpless, our only response would be to call on everyone else for help and pray that we were covered… Read more »

Airborne
Airborne
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Number of facts wrong John, budget increasing in real terms but not spent effectively, maritime movement will be just as important and more so in the future and the long oft repeated story we need US approval to use Trident. Also war is changing yes, but that’s moreover about individual countries inability to carry out effective and prolonged war independently and therefore all countries need and utilise Allies.

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Airborne

Were our buget spent well, yes it would be different. Got the deterrent wrong, I now know better. Our views clearly differ on the other points. I’ll leave it at that.

Airborne
Airborne
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Agreed but the deterrent view is a very contentious one with people having different views and interpretation of its sovereignty. And it will always be so methinks.

Jonathan
Jonathan
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Hi john I very much agree on the comment around defence, I do think the U.K. has underestimated the risk around a European conflict or a conflict in which traditions alliances are less likely to be supportive of So I do think the U.K. needs to very much look at its own ability to defend its areas of responsibility and influence. That does mean looking at areas of weakness. Which I think you can see happening. Better ground based air defence capability, the ability to disperse aircraft more frigates for the RN ect. Because of our geography a lot of… Read more »

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Jonathan

More good analysis. Thanks.

AV
AV
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

You talk absolute tosh, ….and I love it (free evenings entertainment)…the truth is totally contrary to your agenda. The one thing the global pandemic has shown is the ‘Total’ reliance on the global free movement of maritime trade and goods hence a renewed importance with regards sea power and freedom of navigation. Total opposite of what you’re selling. The more you post the more you don’t make sense 👍

Jonathan
Jonathan
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

On your point about sea power I would argue that the sea is now even more strategically important, there is no nation on Earth ( or continent even) that has the required access to all the natural resources to run a 21centery manufacturing economy. China, Europe, America and Russia all need raw materials that are scattered across the globe. Chinese whole strategic goal ( the replacement of an American led liberal democracy hedgmony with A Chinese led hedgmony) is dependent on a Mercantile strategy than needs A web of interdependence things to succeed, remove any one and its strategy will… Read more »

Sean
Sean
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Then why is China obsessed with securing seaports around the globe and rapidly expanding its navy?…

Farouk
Farouk
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

John wrote:
“”, or in a final resort to plead with the US to be allowed to use ‘our’ Tridents.””

That is misinformation pushed out by the left of the political centre. The UK Nuclear deterent is a totally UK call.

Steve
Steve
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Realistically, we have zero influence over Russia. The only way to influence them is talking trade, and we wouldn’t remove our sanctions on them without the US first giving us the nod. That gives Germany more influence as they already have trade with Russia that they could cut.

Russia isn’t scared of the US military as it knows they won’t get involved and same goes for ours.

Sean
Sean
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Well ‘Global Britain’ currently has a RN vessel en route to deliver aid to Tonga, thanks to our new permanent presence in the Pacific.

As for talks, Russia wants to talk to the US rather than NATO because it uses every opportunity to try and drive a wedge between the US and other member nations.

Tomartyr
Tomartyr
2 months ago
Reply to  DanielMorgan

Care to explain what makes Germany a player?

Jonathan
Jonathan
2 months ago
Reply to  Tomartyr

Wealth, population and industrial base. they aways talk with a big voice in geopolitics. Normally the state of The Germam armed force And the nations lack of willingness to support armed conflict would lessen that voice (Consider the French third republic and how that went). But this does not matter one iota in The case of Germany, NATO and being surrounded by friends means the actual state of its armed forces is meaningless to its geopolitical power, it’s simply can ignore military power and it can with impunity throw around that very significant Wealth and economic power with its full… Read more »

Tomartyr
Tomartyr
2 months ago
Reply to  Jonathan

Ah the “We’ll just turn off the Russian gas ourselves” play.
Reminds me of when they were saying we’d use our economic weight, and threaten to stop buying German cars, to get whatever Brexit deal we wanted.

Jonathan
Jonathan
2 months ago
Reply to  Tomartyr

Yes well the less said about Germany making itself depended on cheap gas imports the better. But it’s no more stupid than us inviting china to build a nuclear power station or our 5G infrastructure ( thank god we saw sence). The west has been generally very foolish about both China and For Germany Russia. You don’t feed you strategic likely enemies money and influence and you do not destroy your own industries because they make stuff cheaper. The west dropped the ball big time from the 90s onwards, all the end of history, the world will become liberal democracy… Read more »

Last edited 2 months ago by Jonathan
Matt
Matt
2 months ago
Reply to  DanielMorgan

IMO Germany is more a supplicant than a player. They have spent the last years supporting Russia’s building up of its armed forces, whilst undermining Ukraine. Plus they have tied their future energy supply to Putin’s apron strings with no plan B, whilst closing down both their nuclear and coal-powered alternatives. They have not even built the LNG terminals to get gas supplies other than from Russia. To begin to remedy that will take 10 years or more. Until then their strategic autonomy from Moscow is limited. It’s not a pleasant thing to write, but that is how I see… Read more »

AV
AV
2 months ago
Reply to  Matt

Most accurate post out of some of the rubbish listed above 👍

Oliver LINES
Oliver LINES
2 months ago
Reply to  AV

Germany stopped the RAF using it airspace to transport weapons.

Meirion x
Meirion x
2 months ago
Reply to  Matt

Agreed!

Sean
Sean
2 months ago
Reply to  Matt

Spot on summary of the situation.

AV
AV
2 months ago
Reply to  DanielMorgan

Disagree, we’re an ally that’s offering and delivering assistance whilst half of Europe stands idle, Russia will certainly be taking note.

Oliver LINES
Oliver LINES
2 months ago
Reply to  AV

We should increase the credit line to Ukraine to allow them to buy more and include Georgia as well as Poland.

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  AV

So you are happy that we are supporting a country ruled by oligarchs, is riddled with corruption (like Hunter Biden and Mr 10%, his Dad), that has, due to its policies since 2014, lost most of its working population (to both east and west) as well as its industry (aircraft, helicopters, ships, tanks etc), is heavily in debt (to the EU, IMF, US and UK) with no hope of repaying it, is authoritarian (all TV opposing the Government shut down), honours its NAZI heroes both now and in the past, actually has a NAZI type military unit, plus has virtually… Read more »

AV
AV
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

I think you’re reply says more about your politics than it does mine my friend 😉

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  AV

Maybe but that was all facts. I just missed out the bit about a very major source of Ukrainian revenue being gas transit fees, with the current contract ending at the end of 2024. So what is going on now has nothing to do with that and the risk that the West has of having to stump up another $1.5B in support.

AV
AV
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Have you an agenda with this topic?…or am I missing something lol

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  AV

Not really, just expressing a contrary view.

David Steeper
David Steeper
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

And whose people are free to express their opinions, demonstrate against their govt and vote for who they like. You do any of those things and let us know how you get on ?

AV
AV
2 months ago
Reply to  David Steeper

👍😉

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  David Steeper

Well I voted for Brexit and Boris, both went rather well.

AV
AV
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Your political views somewhat contradict that statement 😳😂🤪…

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  AV

Don;t see why, I’ve voted Conservative since roughly 1965.

AV
AV
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Lol, think you’re more John in Minsk, than John in Milton Keynes….even if I’m wrong I’d perhaps advise a move to the former..

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  AV

What, with the weather they have at this time of year? No way, there is no John Lewis branch there!

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Boris? Leader of the party Party.

Airborne
Airborne
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

So you don’t like the Ukraine? Putins Russia the democratic light of the East then?

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Airborne

Not particularly no. I saw enough of their actions in 2015 to put me off for life. I have claimed nothing here about Russia’s political system and wont as I know very little about it.

Airborne
Airborne
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Cheeks of the same arse in my view, but, regardless of this, Putin has no right to carry out further operations in another’s country, regardless of what justification he comes up with, ie ethnic Russians in Donbas etc. Same shit Hitler come up with in 38 regarding invasion of the Sudetenland.

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Airborne

Interesting turn of phrase there. The fundamental problem in Ukraine is that the Government will not implement the Minsk agreement that it signed up to in 2016 when they were under extreme military pressure. If they did all this would go away.

Airborne
Airborne
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

I thought it was 2015? But anyway which part is it not implementing as both sides do not seem to be complying with the requirements which were agreed?

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Airborne

You are right, my mistake. The onus is on the Ukrainian Government to implement it as it covers the whole country and they haven’t started to do so.

Airborne
Airborne
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

I will have to re-read the thing again but having read updates and reports on what is actually happening then our perception of events will be different. Both countries are not complying or implementing what was laid down and if we are honest it is in Putins favour for it not to be.

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Airborne

Only one country in the agreement, Ukraine, no other. Russia made sure that it was not part of the agreement and has the same status as France and Germany, the others in the Normandy Four. The Parties are the Ukrainian Government and Donesk and Luhansk..

Airborne
Airborne
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

I will need to peruse the details once more but verify you are talking the Minsk II?

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Airborne

Yes Minsk 11

Sean
Sean
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Perhaps Russia should first honour the Budapest Memorandum of 1994 to honour Ukraine’s sovereignty and existing borders?…

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Sean

From memory, Lavrov’s view on that was the Memorandum was abrogated when the elected Government in Kiev was overthrown by the coup in 2014.

Sean
Sean
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Well the guilty would claim that wouldn’t they 🤷🏻‍♂️

Jonathan
Jonathan
2 months ago
Reply to  Airborne

I like that, cheeks of the same arse, works for so many things,I’m pinching that. Can’t really disagree with the sentiment either.

Airborne
Airborne
2 months ago
Reply to  Jonathan

No worries 😂👍!

Meirion x
Meirion x
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Looking for NAZI’s as usual! Go look in Eastern Germany or France, sponsored of course by your friend Mr Putin!

Last edited 2 months ago by Meirion x
JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Meirion x

Try searching Azov in Ukraine, their logo is the “Wolfsangel” rune used by the 2nd SS Panzer Division ‘Das Reich’ or Stepan Bandera, the WWII leader of the Hitler supporting Ukrainian nationalists, who led the slaughter of thousands of Jews and is now a national hero. The Russians hate Azov.

Airborne
Airborne
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Interesting read John, but alas from my experience with Russians and certain military organisations, white nationalists and blatant right wing “Nazism” is rife in the Russkie mil also. Both countries are about 30 years behind when it comes to race relations, diversity, equality and fairness!

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Airborne

Agreed but Azov proved in 2014/15 to be not just ‘normal’ right wing militarism but an active unit that viciously and without mercy applied its techniques in an ethnic cleaning campaign agaist the DNR/LDR separatists. Very proud of their beliefs they were too. Which is why virtually everyone with any interest in the area believes that if Ukrainian forces striking south releases the Russian Army special measures are planned for Azov. Civil Wars can be extremely vicious, as we know from our past.

Airborne
Airborne
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Special measures are planned for Azov? See cheeks of the same arse, Russkie extremists taking revenge on Ukrainian extremists! Nothing changes or are the special measures planned for the Azov forces, by the Russians ok?

Meirion x
Meirion x
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Ukraine is a young democracy, the TV stations shut down were controlled by oligarchs you moan about. The country has set sights on the democratic road, unlike your friend’ country despot Putin.

SD67
SD67
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

RU troll alert?

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  SD67

Your troll alert is faulty. I just say things outside the Borg here.

Jonathan
Jonathan
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Hi john yes, Ukraine is not really any different from many other states and they don’t go over the real red lines. But we also support some completely totalitarian states that a pretty much on the same level as China in regards to oppression of their own population. In truth Ethics ( and don’t get me wrong I don’t like this fact) have no place in Geopolitics, all that matters is your own nations security and interest, that can be best served by enlightened self interest or supporting other nations. But no nation has ever done a single thing (… Read more »

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Jonathan

Very good, but what I can’t get my head around is why the UK Government thinks it is in our interests to pour thousands of good anti tank weapons into Ukraine, as opposed to the US’s 300? When everyone knows they can be used offensively. They are thus effectively encouraging Kiev to attack Donbas. It looks like the UK supplying munitions so the Ukrainians can die fighting Russia in the hidden interests of the UK.

Jonathan
Jonathan
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

No I think you need to remember we have a shared interest with Ukraine, they want to be free and independent and it’s in our interest that they stay free and independent. U.K. interest is best by free, strong independent European nations. At present Russia is using naked aggression so we do need to strengthen that nation to resist this. If Russia invaded it will not be Ukrainians dieing for a hidden U.K. interest it will be Russians and Ukrainians dying because Russia did not respect Ukraine sovereignty ( that’s the bottom line and you can’t wrap it up any… Read more »

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Jonathan

We have different views on Ukraine as a nation. Many on here disagree but I still believe that the only way that Russia will attack is if the Donbas is attacked. What Russia is doing now is maintaining its deterrence posture against a re-equiping Ukrainian army none of which was withdrawn from positions at the front last year.

Jonathan
Jonathan
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Hi john, yes but differing views is fine geopolitics is chaos and complexity incarnate when you add in the behaviours of individual people to the mix it’s impossible to predict and you never know if your right wrong or a bit right until the fat lady sings. Personally think this a more about a Russian Nato negotiation than anything else. I don’t think Russia wants a major war neither does Ukraine or NATO ( if I though anyone did I would be stocking the bunker now). This is about the future boundaries of NATO how russia can feel safe and… Read more »

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Jonathan

You are right but Russia views NATO as a US tool so is really only negotiating directly with the boss, the US. Trouble is that the State Department is not used to dealing with a country that is imposing demands on it instead of the other way round, so is having big internal problems coming up with a written response to Russia’s proposals.

Jonathan
Jonathan
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

The other key problem is that Russia has completely miss understood that NATO is not the US and actually the US cannot negotiate for NATO. It’s a really significant miss understand and not understanding power that even small NATO nations have in the decision making of NATO, the US can be considered first amongst equals but that’s it, it’s one reason Trump hated NATO so much.

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Jonathan

I think you are wrong but correct if it were the EU. Up until now the US has had economic, military and personal control over NATO, a factor recognised by Russia. It is clear that part of Russia’s strategy at the moment is to try and drive a wedge into that power structure and, with France, Italy and Germany breaking ranks re Ukraine responses, it seems that they might be making some headway. In some ways the current incompetence being shown by US diplomats could well lead to the end of NATO and the emergence of new groupings.

Airborne
Airborne
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Any kinetic active weapon system can be used in the offensive role! However the type and effect/range of NLAW ensures it is most effective in the defensive role to include OBUA, fixed or fluid defences.

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Airborne

Agreed, but they I assume could be useful in trench warfare when the sides are 1-200 meters apart as a bunker buster.

Tams
Tams
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

We don’t give a toss about your US domestic stuff.

But you seem hell bent on denigrating the West. I at least hope you don’t live in a Western country.

I’d want you to leave here, but your comments are good entertainment.

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Tams

I admire your confidence in using ‘we’. Shame you can’t take a bit of reality comment. All is not wonderful anywhere in the world and the West is doing its bit too. There is a hint in where I live in my name.

Oliver LINES
Oliver LINES
2 months ago
Reply to  DanielMorgan

Germany has done sod all. It stopped exports of defensive equipment to Ukraine according to the FT and stopped RAF flights using its airspace to transport any defensive equipment.

Oliver LINES
Oliver LINES
2 months ago
Reply to  DanielMorgan

Germany has not got rid of Nordstrum 2. It is too busy paying fhe rearming of Russia.

Airborne
Airborne
2 months ago
Reply to  DanielMorgan

Germany? Really? Germany certainly isn’t a player, it’s a payer, for Russki gas and Putin knows he has them by the balls and they won’t rock the boat.

AV
AV
2 months ago
Reply to  Airborne

Agree with most of your posts Airborne so take this as its ment…Germany certainly is a player but not in the military sense…they’ve been playing the EU and Russians for decades. Their toast always lands butter side up….and all whilst contributing the bare minimum 👍

Airborne
Airborne
2 months ago
Reply to  AV

Agreed in that respect mate 👍!

AV
AV
2 months ago
Reply to  Airborne

Thought you would mate 😉👍

Quill
Quill
2 months ago
Reply to  DanielMorgan

It won’t deter putin from invading. However you underestimate the effectiveness of the Nlaws in guerilla warfare, which is what these will be used for. Thought some old rpgs and milans were dangerous in Afghanistan? The Nlaws will be much more effective. Combined that with the fact that Ukraine has conscription and although standards aren’t very high, much higher than your average Afghani or Iraqi insurgent. So you have a decently trained population trained from conscription, carrying out guerilla warfare with much better weaponry, that and they don’t have a coalition like in the Gulf war so they’re effectively sinking… Read more »

AV
AV
2 months ago
Reply to  Quill

Spot on!…too many confuse NLAWS with the likes of ‘light’ LAW 80 etc…
This thing might be light in weight but certainly heavyweight in delivery …and all at the hands of a relatively un-trained operative. NLAWS will defeat all current MBT in top flight mode irrespective of counter measures or reactive armour. An inspired move by HM government as basically gives Joe Bloggs the ability to defeat a MBT….if that isn’t deterrence I’m not sure what is.

eclipse
eclipse
2 months ago
Reply to  DanielMorgan

One error by both of you; Wallace invited Shoigu, the defence minister, not Lavrov.  Now on to the important bits… calling the UK a minor player in most things, let alone global political influence, is not true; for political influence… well we’re in the top three. Debatable how you measure. Soft power number one, hard power perhaps four or five, overall probably right behind US and China. Calling Germany a player and not the UK is flatly ridiculous; their military capacity is far smaller than ours and their influence equally outmatched.  Calculations by the Russians? Well, I speak Russian and… Read more »

Jonathan
Jonathan
2 months ago
Reply to  eclipse

Russia will be very concerned about the U.K. we are in a position to isolate their shipping from the Atlantic. Most people really underestimate our strategic position sitting across most of Europe’s access to the Atlantic, although reduced in number the RN and RAF would still be able to pretty much completely interdict Russian movement in and out of the North Atlantic. To really have a chance to hit the U.K. hard back Russia would always have to stretch it’s armed forces which would likely hurt them very hard. How many bombers and fighters would make the trip back to… Read more »

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
2 months ago
Reply to  Jonathan

Our geographic position is only really of use in wartime. We surely are not going to inhibit the movement of Russian ships and submarines to/from the Atlantic in peacetime, even in times of tension.

Jonathan
Jonathan
2 months ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Hi Graham it depends, although you can not deny passage to one specific nation ( onside of war). The U.K. could start ensuring complete compliance with legislation around pollution control of shipping, by stopping and inspecting all ships of a specific age or without prior evidence of compliance with national legislation on pollution control. So actually a nation that manages a strait can if so wishes make it very problematic especially for a nation with a very old and likely polluting warships. But the reality is Russia always has to have in the back of its mind a war between… Read more »

sd67
sd67
2 months ago
Reply to  DanielMorgan

Nice try. The reality is Putin is a bully of weak people. He’s never had to face serious pushback. The reality of the situation is Ukrainian is a sovereign strategy and senior nato partner with whom we have a longstanding defence relationship including trainers on the ground now

FatDave
FatDave
2 months ago
Reply to  DanielMorgan

So what are the Germans doing!? Waiting to deploy the medium range Nord Stream 2?

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
2 months ago
Reply to  DanielMorgan

Daniel,

Is Germany a player, really? Or a victim of high Russian gas prices, like the rest of us. What military hardware has Germany supplied to Ukraine? Are they involved in talks with the Russians? Their military readiness is appalling and they have scarcely any more tanks than we have.

I am certainly not arguing that UK is a major player in all this – you are right there.

Alex
Alex
1 month ago
Reply to  DanielMorgan

The UK is the second most powerful member of NATO.

chris stocken
chris stocken
2 months ago

Are They from British stock?.

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
2 months ago
Reply to  chris stocken

Interesting question, from what other stock could they come from?

chris stocken
chris stocken
2 months ago
Reply to  Spyinthesky

The yanks have a massive store at RAF Welford!!

Andrew
Andrew
2 months ago
Reply to  chris stocken

The US don’t use it.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
2 months ago
Reply to  Andrew

Don’t use NLAW or Welford? They do use RAF Welford.

Last edited 2 months ago by Daniele Mandelli
James
James
2 months ago

I was just enjoying reading your other comment😂

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
2 months ago
Reply to  James

Yes, and realised I probably had the wrong end of the stick!!

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
2 months ago

He means NLAW of course

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
2 months ago
Reply to  Spyinthesky

Yes, my 1st comment was wrong.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
2 months ago

Sky News!

Britain’s armed forces have flown some 2,000 anti-tank weapons to Ukraine this week amid fears of an imminent, new Russian invasion.

“George Allison, of the UK Defence Journal, a website focused on defence news, posted on Twitter a time-lapse of the flights, which he said began on Monday.”

https://news.sky.com/story/russia-invasion-fears-as-britain-sends-2-000-anti-tank-weapons-to-ukraine-12520950

Daniel
Daniel
2 months ago
Reply to  chris stocken

The US doesn’t use the NLAW

Coll
Coll
2 months ago
Reply to  Spyinthesky

It looks like there’s manufacturing in the UK for the NLAW.

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
2 months ago
Reply to  Coll

In Northern Ireland I think with Contributions from various other sites. All under the auspices of Thales it seems.

Goldilocks
Goldilocks
2 months ago
Reply to  chris stocken

Surplus, war or reserve stocks – these weapons will probably need replacing soon – so it’s a win win – Ukraine get more weapons, and we get rid of the stuff we don’t need.

Ian M
Ian M
2 months ago
Reply to  Goldilocks

SAAB say a shelf life of 20 years so as it came into service c.2009 there’s a few years left yet.

Mr Bell
Mr Bell
2 months ago
Reply to  Goldilocks

Agree. Manufactured in Belfast so we should be able to replace relatively quickly. Id like HMG to announce a follow on order asap

Jonathan
Jonathan
2 months ago
Reply to  Goldilocks

The treasury will ask for them back if there is no invasion 😂🤣

Farouk
Farouk
2 months ago
Reply to  chris stocken

Chris wrote:
Are They from British stock?.

The UK MOD ordered 20000 so I presume yes

Sceptical Richard
Sceptical Richard
2 months ago

Blooming heck! Didn’t know we had so many NLAWs to give away! Someone asked why Atlas was not used. I suspect the A400M is not cleared by the RAF as yet to carry explosives?

David
David
2 months ago

Wiki says the UK purchased 20,000.

Watcherzero
Watcherzero
2 months ago

Its the long way to go simply carrying freight, for this role the C17 is better.

Watcherzero
Watcherzero
2 months ago

And so far over 2000 have been counted being unloaded (eight flights each carrying around 17 pallets holding 18 missiles)

Rob
Rob
2 months ago

Let’s just hope these NLAWs aren’t used. If they are it will mean that the dug in Ukrainian infantry are under close assault from Russian armour; it will not be a small war. Such a battle would be more akin to the eastern front battles of WW2 than the limited battles of recent wars. Even a limited offensive would produce thousands of casualties and many thousands of refugees. For an idea of the ground and likely course of such a conflict look at the 1st & 2nd battles of the Donbass.

Farouk
Farouk
2 months ago

I had a butchers last night and to be frank the Ukraine isn’t short of Anti-Armour weaponary: SPG-9 range 800 metres (Able to kill a T64BV) RPG-29 range 800 metres (Has proven effective agaisnt the US M1 Abrams) RPG-26 RPG-22 RPG-18 RPG-16 RPG-7 RK-3 Corsar range 2500 metres Skif (ATGM) range 5 kilometres Barrier range 5 kilometres KOMBAT range 4 kilometres Stugna-P range 4 kilometres 9K115 Metis range 1000 metres (extra stocks received from Lithuania ) 9K115-2 Metis-M range 2000 metres 9M113 Konkurs range 4000 metres 9K111 range 2500 metres 9M14 Malyutka range 3000 metres FGM-148 Javelin range 2.5 miles… Read more »

Last edited 2 months ago by Farouk
Donaldson
Donaldson
2 months ago
Reply to  Farouk

Perhaps they could do with some starstreak HVM as they don’t have anything to counter RuAF assets I believe? I don’t think we have much ourselves when it comes to AA

Paul T
Paul T
2 months ago
Reply to  Donaldson

Ukraine,as you would expect from an ex – Soviet Republic is not short of capable AA/SAM systems.

Donaldson
Donaldson
2 months ago
Reply to  Paul T

Russia has moved 2 S-400 battalions into Belarus along with 3 squadrons of Su-34 which speculating could be for a no-fly zone, Given the list OP gave from ATGM capabilities I think they could do with some additional AA systems.

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Paul T

Quite a lot of SAM systems but getting left behind update wise, particularly in their ability to hit small targets like cruise missiles and shells. There is a reason the US has not supplied MANPADs, they are regarded as ‘offensive’ so not allowed in.

Farouk
Farouk
2 months ago
Reply to  Donaldson

Just picked up this months Airforce monthly, and it includes 8 pages on the state of affairs regards Ukraines air defences. haven’t rad it yet, but once I will do, I will upload the entire article on a time out basis.

Oleg
Oleg
2 months ago
Reply to  Farouk

Soviet weapons are very old, in addition, they rotted, plundered and sold for 30 years, in addition, Russian saboteurs blew up several large warehouses with the remains
P.S.
Ukraine, even in nightmares, was not going to fight with anyone until 2014
greetings from Kiev

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Oleg

It seemed at the time that those ammo dumps may well have been blown to hide the thefts, as you say, the contents having been plundered and sold. Am I correct in thinking that you don’t have the manufacturing capability to make new 122mm and 152mm shells?

Airborne
Airborne
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Mmmmmmmmmm…..?

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Airborne

Not sure what that means. I have been watching the conflict from the start and when these dumps went up it was via a US site MP.net now defunct. There was a lot of information on there that led not just me to that conclusion. As to the shells AFAIK they were made in Donbas and Ukraine has had to strip the old WP countries of their stocks. I asked the question to see if I could get a more up to date view.

Airborne
Airborne
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

An up to date view, ok thanks for the comprehensive reply.

Tomartyr
Tomartyr
2 months ago
Reply to  Airborne

Can you explain why everyone is suspicious of John?
I’ve seen other people post similar sentiments, or claim we should just let Russia so what it wants, or even claim that we are the aggressor in Russia’s rightful lands and still be considered patriotic pillars of this site’s small community. I feel I’ve missed something.

Last edited 2 months ago by Tomartyr
Airborne
Airborne
2 months ago
Reply to  Tomartyr

Don’t worry just pulling his leg a little. Most of his responses and replies are well thought out and respectfully put! However he does occasionally fall foul of that well known trait of doing our own capabilities down with minimum depth to his comment! We aren’t the biggest, and have suffered neglect but we are still a major player with rounded capabilities that few others have. We are both a hard and soft power, still with influence, no matter what our continuous stream of useless politicians say or do to the opposite! Cheers

Airborne
Airborne
2 months ago
Reply to  Tomartyr

Oh and asking a Ukrainian if they are still able to produce 122 and 152mm Arty shells prior to a possible war……int gathering never sleeps 😂

Oleg
Oleg
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

I don’t know much about shells production in Ukraine, but I found a video from one of the Kiev factories. It seems they are doing shells https://youtu.be/jjAM-1b31cE

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Oleg

Thank you, I’ll check it out.

David S
David S
2 months ago

I think some payback for MH17 and the Salisbury poisonings! “What goes around, comes around”.

John Clark
John Clark
2 months ago
Reply to  David S

Ah, beat me to it David, the Russians ‘demand’ we don’t let Ukraine, Finland, Georgia and Sweden into NATO!

Or they will start a war …. Well, yep we owe them for Salisbury, this seems like suitable payback, hope we’ve written a few slogans on the NLAW warheads.

“Greetings from Sailsbury and all at Malaysian Airlines” might be apt…..

I say invite all those countries to join, throw an iron curtain around Russia and call their bluff…

Geoffi
Geoffi
2 months ago
Reply to  John Clark

Whilst I share your gung-ho desire, you do realise this could go all the way ???

David Steeper
David Steeper
2 months ago
Reply to  Geoffi

I have no doubt if the Russians start taking heavy losses Putin will throw a hissy fit. So we back down if Putin starts rattling his rockets. When do we stop ? The Baltics ? Poland ? Finland ? The Isle of Wight ? If Putins a big enough nut to start a nuclear war someone in the Russian state will arrange an accident to take care of him.

Jonathan
Jonathan
2 months ago
Reply to  David Steeper

I would not lay my families life on that one to be honest. A military conflict that involves competing Nuclear powers has been avoided for 75 years for a reason. Im happy that we support Ukraine in every way that it’s not direct war with Russia. To be honest I don’t think Russia will mount a full invasion, I just don’t think it has the mass to conquer Ukraine without massive casualties, and the fallout would hurt to much for very little gain. I do think something will happen and there will be “minor incidental clashes that can be caused… Read more »

David Steeper
David Steeper
2 months ago
Reply to  Jonathan

Russia invades Baltics and informs other NATO states that if they get involved they will go nuclear ?

Jonathan
Jonathan
2 months ago
Reply to  David Steeper

I think at that point nato would push on with an intervention. The real problem would be if Russia then fires one nuclear weapon in theatre, that is the real problem will America be willing to end humanity for a small Eastern European nation?

This is the big problem As in the end we are talking about species destruction not a war with specific aims.

As lines are pushed people make mistakes and misjudgements It’s a worrying time.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
2 months ago
Reply to  David Steeper

Putin won’t start a nuclear war – and I doubt he will launch a mass invasion of Ukraine. What does he have to gain? He stands to lose too much.

David S
David S
2 months ago
Reply to  Geoffi

I think Putin wants to play toy soldiers and he’s perfectly prepared to bet other peoples lives on it. Am I the only one who sees the parallels with 1930’s Europe here? Let’s call it what it is; a narcissistic dictator claiming to protect his own people so as to invade a sovereign nation. The question is; did he learn anything from history or is he about to make the same big mistake?

simon
simon
2 months ago
Reply to  John Clark

and on top of that saying that NATO should not deploy forces in the county s that joined in Eastern Europe post Cold War!!

Mr Mark Franks
Mr Mark Franks
2 months ago
Reply to  David S

Thinking the same.

Bob
Bob
2 months ago
Reply to  David S

Hope the boys and girls at Cheltenham are on the ball, if this does kick off I suspect the UK might have a few internet problems.

David
David
2 months ago

Just a thought – how many flying hours are left on our C-17 fleet? For such a small size (8 aircraft) they do get worked hard. Still, I’m glad we have them as they are a great asset that not many countries have. I know the line is down and there will be no new airframes but just wished we could have picked up a few more before it closed. I read the price tag was 200m each at the time, so not cheap. Any ideas what we might replace them with when the time comes? – and yeah, I… Read more »

Bob
Bob
2 months ago
Reply to  David

Maybe RAF should look at purchasing a high capacity freighter for general duties and save airframe life on the C17 for tactical requirements?

Mr Bell
Mr Bell
2 months ago
Reply to  David

Plenty of old boeing 700 400+x series and transport aircraft around. Could just buy an old civillian plane add a few RAF systems and use that for ferrying supplies around.

Tams
Tams
2 months ago
Reply to  David

It’s a shame that Airbus didn’t design the A380 with freight in mind as well as passengers.

Paul T
Paul T
2 months ago
Reply to  David

The C17’s were designed for a 30,000 hour lifecycle,this may possibly be extended to 45,000 hours so there’s plenty of life in them.

Geoffi
Geoffi
2 months ago

Hmmm, maybe publishing the departure base is not wise.
Tomorrow a segment of the Loony Left will be camped outside.

Gavin Gordon
Gavin Gordon
2 months ago
Reply to  Geoffi

…. but it’s not a safe space.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
2 months ago
Reply to  Geoffi

I think everyone knows where the C-17s are based.

Mr Bell
Mr Bell
2 months ago

Great. Agree. Get the supplies in now before any conflict. That way Russia cant use the excuse of newly delivered British weapons killing their soldiers once conflict has been joined.
The more we deliver now the better the chances Ukrainian military can put up a stiff resistance.
We should be able to replace these weapons fairly quickly as UK manufactured. In Belfast I believe.
Follow on order for 50,000 more needed.

Dude
Dude
2 months ago

Just below the picture of a delivery to Brize Norton the paragraph says deliveries started on 27th January. Either the UK has a time machine (flight departs 27th and arrives on 17th) or someone should be reminded that, especially with defence matters, accurate proof reading is important.

Gavin Gordon
Gavin Gordon
2 months ago

I magine that average Russians have a niggling doubt in their minds. They’ve seen Putin invade Crimea relatively easily, and the Donbas not quite so smoothly. Neither time having been directly threatened by Ukraine with regard to their own legal sovereign borders, and with the latter conflict still in swing. Now, they are being primed for attacks deeper into Ukraine, extent unascertained, but involving potential fronts to the east, south and north with Belarus (i.e. close to Kiev). All allegedly for the security of Russians – who have still not remotely been invaded during not far short of a decade… Read more »

Rob
Rob
2 months ago
Reply to  Gavin Gordon

Gavin, Russian public opinion is key. Don’t believe all this nonsense about Putin getting 97% of the popular vote. Russia is, understandably after the horrendous casualties of WW2, very casualty averse (remember they lost in Afghanistan precisely because of this). Once the body bags start coming back in large numbers Putin’s position will be hard to maintain. And the body bags will come back in numbers; the Ukrainian armed forces are large and well armed. It will not be a walk in the park for Ivan and even once they’ve taken whatever chunk of Ukraine they want an ongoing insurgency,… Read more »

Gavin Gordon
Gavin Gordon
2 months ago
Reply to  Rob

To succeed, it requires that elysian field for all invaders, the short war. Much predicted, rarely if ever attained. Nazis’ came close with Blitzkrieg; if you ignore the following five years.
AND we have Churchill, who’s determined to save the day. For someone, at least. 🤔

Meirion x
Meirion x
2 months ago
Reply to  Rob

We should help the Ukrainians defend their airspace especially, don’t lose it in begin with, the Ukrainians have substantial ground forces with armour to defend their territory.

Oleg
Oleg
2 months ago
Reply to  Gavin Gordon

the average Russian does not think in the coordinate system you proposed. they are sure that no Ukraine exists. In their opinion, Ukraine is such a ridiculous misunderstanding that should be eliminated.
P.S.
greetings from Kiev
we are all here in high spirits about the received missiles

David Steeper
David Steeper
2 months ago
Reply to  Oleg

No one knows what most Russians think including Putin. If the last 100 years has taught the Russian people one thing it’s to keep their thoughts to themselves. We’ll find out if thousands of Russian soldiers start arriving home in body bags. You can bet Putin and his cronies are thinking about that too. Good luck and I hope for better days for your people.

SD67
SD67
2 months ago
Reply to  Oleg

A few years ago I worked on a big project for rollout of corporate IT systems to Moscow, Kiev, Kazakhstan.

As you say the Russian team on the project basically did not believe in the existence of Ukraine. They see it as just a different postcode within greater russia. Some fun discussions we had!

Meirion x
Meirion x
2 months ago
Reply to  Oleg

Hi Oleg, I been posting for a few weeks, about helping Ukraine to keep control of it’s airspace, this would be most advantageous to your ground forces. I think the West needs to supply early warning radar systems and supply AMRAAM missiles for your Migs.

Last edited 2 months ago by Meirion x
James
James
2 months ago

Does the mod have any stinger manpads in storage I wonder and what the chances they covertly gifted a few of those on the C17s

Supporitve Bloke
Supporitve Bloke
2 months ago
Reply to  James

Keeping state of the art MANPADs from floating around has long been an issue. Things like Stinger are still, rightly, highly controlled because of the risks to civilian airliners taking off. If it was easier for some individual inspired (?) by actions in sandy places to get a MANPAD than to smuggle a bomb on board a plane…….. I am afraid that a lot of the older generation portable MANPADs are a waste of time against airforces with decent countermeasures. So I would be amazed if MANPADs are on those flights. That said we were going to sell them Sea… Read more »

James
James
2 months ago

There will probably be nothing left for sea ceptor to defend by the time they get them

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
2 months ago
Reply to  James

The export of the Ceptor system was granted approval.

Did the export permit include the land based version?

Just a thought.

Steve Scott
Steve Scott
2 months ago

What is the latest Intel? Do we know if the Russians are now at the stage where they are calling up their reserves? Just imagine a war in a country with 15 active nuclear reactors… what could possibly go wrong?

Bob
Bob
2 months ago
Reply to  Steve Scott

Russia is not going to target a nuclear reactor with the likelihood they would be on the receiving end of the fallout. They do have some experience where such things are concerned.

Steve Scott
Steve Scott
2 months ago
Reply to  Bob

Russia won’t target them deliberately however in war nothing is certain so will the technicians and management teams within these nuclear sites stay at their posts? I wouldn’t, I’d get the hell outta there.

Bob
Bob
2 months ago
Reply to  Steve Scott

The Russians know where they are, they built them.

Sean
Sean
2 months ago
Reply to  Steve Scott

They did at Chernobyl, many paying for it with their lives.

Watcherzero
Watcherzero
2 months ago
Reply to  Steve Scott

Latest is 6 landing ships have crossed into the Atlantic from the Baltic and Northern fleets probably heading for the Black Sea and Russia has just begun wargames with Belarus on the Ukranian border without providing the customary 42 days notice to other countries or inviting foreign observers which they are legally obligated to do if more than 9,000 soldiers are involved.

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Watcherzero

Re those ships, they may be off to join the Syrian Express supply line. The Russians might have got everyone looking in the wrong direction and they actually plan to do something in Syria not Ukraine.

Mr Bell
Mr Bell
2 months ago
Reply to  Watcherzero

US state dept just 10 hours ago said an invasion could be imminent. The amphibious fleet sailing for the black sea could potentially be to enable a 2nd wave or 2nd front along black sea coastline.
If they do invade Ukraine and are involved in the conflict they shouldnt be allowed to sail back to Russian northern and Baltic fleets. Let them try to run through the Med as target practice for Italian,French and Spanish fleets. If those countries have the balls to stand upto Putin.

Matt
Matt
2 months ago
Reply to  Mr Bell

They won’t intervene on that; neither will we.

I do not see that as any different from intervening with NATO ground or air forces.

Might be different if Russia has already invaded further parts of the Ukraine.

David Steeper
David Steeper
2 months ago
Reply to  Matt

The Spanish might let them dock. They’ve done it before.

Steve
Steve
2 months ago
Reply to  Mr Bell

That would be an act of war, realistically NATO or countries listed are not going to war with Russia over Ukraine. That point has been made by no country providing supporting land forces.

sd67
sd67
2 months ago
Reply to  Watcherzero

no doubt tailed by an ssn

Oleg
Oleg
2 months ago
Reply to  Steve Scott

in addition to problems with nuclear reactors, there is the possibility of undermining the dam of the Kiev hydroelectric power station. the consequences will be awful

Donaldson
Donaldson
2 months ago

As I type the 8th C-17 has just taken off en route to Kyiv, If all flights are carrying 16 pallets worth that’s a total of 2304 NLAWs delivered.

Oleg
Oleg
2 months ago

in Kiev, everyone is discussing this event and many are in high spirits about the received missiles.
I would like to thank Britain

Mr Bell
Mr Bell
2 months ago
Reply to  Oleg

Our pleasure. Im sorry we are not sending an armoured division. Even our elderly chally2s are still a damn sight better than Russian T64/72/80 crap.
I think NATO needs to wake up and rearm Russia and China are about to prove to the world that tin pot dictators are still around and still craving conquest and empire.

Matt
Matt
2 months ago
Reply to  Mr Bell

TBF that worm has turned (in part), but late in the day and it will take more time.

nato-defence-budgets.jpg
Last edited 2 months ago by Matt
Meirion x
Meirion x
2 months ago
Reply to  Mr Bell

Actually the Ukrainian T-64MK’s are better than Russian T-72’s, they been upgraded since the 90’s.

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Meirion x

Interesting claim. Russia is still making very upgraded new T-72B3M. Do you know which version of the T-72 is being used by the DNR/LDR militias? The main Russian units have T-90A with T-90M now being delivered.

Meirion x
Meirion x
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK
Last edited 2 months ago by Meirion x
JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Meirion x

Interesting , thanks.

Jonathan
Jonathan
2 months ago
Reply to  Oleg

Hopefully all we are seeing is an aggressive geopolitical play from Russia and nothing more. Hopefully the rest of Europe showing some strong red lines as well and clearly iterate that an a strong independent Ukraine is the only thing that’s acceptable. I do think we need to also consider the Russian view ( know your enemy and the best battle is one that’s not needed) I suspect a lot of this comes from an inbuilt Russian fear and mistrust of Western European powers (we have invaded few times to be fair) although the need of Ukraine to be independent… Read more »

Last edited 2 months ago by Jonathan
Meirion x
Meirion x
2 months ago
Reply to  Jonathan

You seem to have got very naive thinking! The idea of Europe defending itself’ is laughable, because it has a neighbour with lopsided military capabilites.
That’s why we have NATO, post Cold War as well, and into the future.

Last edited 2 months ago by Meirion x
Jonathan
Jonathan
2 months ago
Reply to  Meirion x

Meirion the reality is Russia is not an economic peer to the major European economies, it’s only the faulty world view that came out of the end of the Cold War ( the peace dividend and end of history rubbish) that has lead to any military lack of parity, so it’s not the idea of Europe defending itself which is laughable, it the idea that Europe is not able to defend itself which is what’s laughable ( and very sad). Russia is not China, its military would not be able to sustain a major operation that threatened Western Europe, the… Read more »

Last edited 2 months ago by Jonathan
Martin
Martin
2 months ago

Maybe time to send some “volunteers” to Ukraine. It’s great that we are sending them missile but would be better if we sent a modern air defence system. I can’t imagine the Russian Air Force being much use against something like Land Ceptor and I can’t imagine Russia getting very far without air superiority.

Jonathan
Jonathan
2 months ago

Just a thought as we know the treasury is nothing if not cheap do you think they included a “use incase of invasion only” and a “if not used return to sender in 1 year” clause.

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Jonathan

Or a not for resale clause as if there is a stand down they will be off somewhere as cash sales. A well beaten path in Ukraine. I’d be surprised if some hadn’t been sold as soon as they are/were deployed, to the Russians.

Last edited 2 months ago by JohninMK
Meirion x
Meirion x
2 months ago
Reply to  JohninMK

The warpons supplied will be on lend-lease type of terms, so Not for resale, only returned or destroyed.

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  Meirion x

I’d bet that lots would be stolen if not used. Good money on the black market is a Ukrainian weakness.

James
James
2 months ago

Stingers on the way from Lithuania

JohninMK
JohninMK
2 months ago
Reply to  James

That will change things.

FatDave
FatDave
2 months ago

Nice work. I did fear we had sent them PIATs

Ilona Doerfler
Ilona Doerfler
2 months ago

Thank you🇬🇧💙💛

iain bloor
iain bloor
2 months ago

Tosh. Great Britain could easily field 500 MBT’s, 80,000 troops and hundreds of warships if shove came to push!

Russia is a paper tiger. Our superior forces would easily defeat them.

we should use all three parachute battalions as shock troops to push them back a few hundred miles from their current forming up points.

our submarines could easily sink all six Russian assault ships currently on route to invade Odessa.

the British bulldog craves a fight, an easy victory for our heroes!!!!!