The Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Normandy (CG 60) and the Ohio-class ballistic missile submarine USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) conducted a rare joint operation in the Norwegian Sea on June 23, 2024.

This significant naval exercise, part of a broader show of force, included support from a P-8A Poseidon maritime patrol aircraft and an E-6B Mercury, often referred to as the “Doomsday Plane.”

The USS Tennessee’s participation is particularly noteworthy, as ballistic missile submarines (SSBNs) rarely surface during operations.

This visible presence sends a powerful message of deterrence to Russia and demonstrates the US Navy’s multi-domain readiness and capability to project power across different theatres.

Headquartered in Naples, Italy, Naval Forces Europe-Africa (NAVEUR-NAVAF) operates US naval forces within the US European Command (USEUCOM) and US Africa Command (USAFRICOM) areas of responsibility.

The US Sixth Fleet, permanently assigned to NAVEUR-NAVAF, employs maritime forces across the full spectrum of joint and naval operations, ensuring stability and security in the region.

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George has a degree in Cyber Security from Glasgow Caledonian University and has a keen interest in naval and cyber security matters and has appeared on national radio and television to discuss current events. George is on Twitter at @geoallison
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Jim
Jim (@guest_830146)
15 days ago

I have to say I’m never too sure why the USN is so willing to conduct surface operations with its Ohio’s.

Seems way too risky giving away their acoustic information.

It’s not like Russia and China won’t be assuming there is an Ohio lurking there anyway.

It’s about as daft as the Russian’s sailing their latest SSN into Havana just so the entire second fleet and the rest of NATO can follow her and get all her acoustic signature.

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky (@guest_830156)
15 days ago
Reply to  Jim

Expressing part contempt and part confidence I guess. I suspect Russian experts are advising on the likely effects of using effectively hard power to advance soft power. Let’s hope they are on the ball.

Jim
Jim (@guest_830158)
15 days ago
Reply to  Spyinthesky

They have done much the same around China as well though, even having Ohios surface around South Korea. Just seems like something we woukd never do with our Vanguards, we seem to take extreme precautions to ensure they are never followed or detected as do the French but I’m always seeing story’s these days about Ohios surfacing as a show of strength. The US has its triad so maybe it’s more relaxed about its SSBN force than us but the vast bulk of Americas nuclear capability is its Ohio fleet so it’s really has much the same issue as us… Read more »

Netking
Netking (@guest_830169)
15 days ago
Reply to  Jim

I think this display is signaling to Russia in response for the little Cuba stunt they pulled recently. It’s a very aggressive one at that and one I can’t remember this blatant in recent memory. It’s basically saying to Russia…”Consider how quickly a trident on a depressed trajectory launched from this close to Moscow will get there” With regards to the Ohio’s popping up, again it’s all strategic signaling and confidence that they can get away with it. I’m no expert but I’m sure they have a couple Virginia’s or a Seawolf not far away waiting to see who will… Read more »

FormerUSAF
FormerUSAF (@guest_830173)
15 days ago
Reply to  Jim

May be a function of a Democratically led DoD, and the associated, widely perceived weakness of US foreign and military policy, post the shameful Afghan withdrawal debacle. BTW, USN may become a better equipped nuclear force post 2035, if SLCM-N program reaches fruition. Eventually, 60+ USN SSNs, equipped w/ tactical level nukes, trolling for possible prey! Hopefully, RN will be offered favorable LendLease terms for own complement of weaps aboard SSN-A. Uncle Sugar should be capable of dispensing these weaps like Pez! 😉 Unfortunately, RAN may not be able to participate, due to the anachronistic non-proliferation treaty. Potentially sufficient nukes… Read more »

Pleiades
Pleiades (@guest_830199)
15 days ago
Reply to  FormerUSAF

Usual 💩 from the merkin 🤡 yawn 🥱

Jim
Jim (@guest_830256)
15 days ago
Reply to  FormerUSAF

Will be interesting to see what materialise for ssn for smaller tactical ballistic missiles. Could very much be what’s on ssn A.

FormerUSAF
FormerUSAF (@guest_830278)
15 days ago
Reply to  Jim

Precisely.

Andrew
Andrew (@guest_830275)
15 days ago
Reply to  Jim

I am not expert on submarine acoustics, nor SSBN patrol locations, but I think you might be giving the Russians too much credit….

Jonathan
Jonathan (@guest_830147)
15 days ago

That’s an interesting geostrategic move. Not sure I agree with it ( as instinctively I’m not a lover of brinksmanship with nuclear weapons), but it’s interesting and a very significant action.

Jon
Jon (@guest_830167)
15 days ago
Reply to  Jonathan

First time I’ve heard willy waving described as geostrategic.

Jonathan
Jonathan (@guest_830174)
15 days ago
Reply to  Jon

Willy waving with nuclear or conventional deterrents is always geostrategic…it may be clever or not so clever and yes you can describe it as Willy waving or sabre rattling…but it matters….the Soviets Union stuck its willies on Cuba for geostrategic reasons and almost triggered the war of the willies.

Arson Fire
Arson Fire (@guest_830202)
15 days ago
Reply to  Jonathan

This whole thread is giving me the willies.

FormerUSAF
FormerUSAF (@guest_830209)
15 days ago
Reply to  Jonathan

Any relationship to the War of the Roses 🌹? 😉😁

Arson Fire
Arson Fire (@guest_830201)
15 days ago
Reply to  Jon

You won the internet with that comment.

FormerUSAF
FormerUSAF (@guest_830210)
15 days ago
Reply to  Jon

Some countries may simply be justifiably proud of the size of their willies and are willing to put them in public display. 🤣😂😁😉. Sorry, simply couldn’t resist the opportunity to contribute to this discussion.

FormerUSAF
FormerUSAF (@guest_830211)
15 days ago
Reply to  FormerUSAF

Damn, missed the opportunity to phrase that sentence to read in part…willing to put them on pubic display. 😁

Jon
Jon (@guest_830225)
15 days ago
Reply to  FormerUSAF

Your verbal ejaculation was premature? This is the Internet. we’ve all been there.

Last edited 15 days ago by Jon
FormerUSAF
FormerUSAF (@guest_830281)
15 days ago
Reply to  Jon

Credit where credit is due–impressive bon mot. Well played. 👍

Jim
Jim (@guest_830267)
15 days ago
Reply to  FormerUSAF

😀😂

Jon
Jon (@guest_830168)
15 days ago

All the Ticonderogas gone within three years, right?

FormerUSAF
FormerUSAF (@guest_830212)
15 days ago
Reply to  Jon

Interesting question. 👍 Short answer: nominally, yes. Longer answer: perhaps, depending upon multiple factors, principally including the rate of commissioning of the AB class Flight 3 DDGs, the prospective rate of progress of the DDG(X) program, and, most importantly, the whims of Congress during any particular FY. Others have speculated that the decision may be influenced by the tides, the prevailing winds, the phases of the moon, the stock market performance, etc. (Bottom line: Do not believe anyone in the US government can definitively answer this question w/ absolute confidence at this time.)

GlynH
GlynH (@guest_830227)
15 days ago

Many bang on about the age of the Vanguards, yet some of these Ohios are a fair bit older.

Ken
Ken (@guest_830245)
15 days ago

Seems to me that given the length of time the Ohio’s have been in service there’s a strong likelihood that foreign nations have already had numerous opportunities to pick up and analyse their acoustic signatures. Given the size of the US sub fleet I think the more pertinent question would be, what other US kit is shadowing in the vicinity? Is the Ohio’s the cheese, baiting other subs to come record it, whilst another sub sits quietly scanning anything in the area which turns up to take a look?

Jon
Jon (@guest_830688)
13 days ago
Reply to  Ken

A cute idea. I hope it’s true.