Prime Minister Boris Johnson said today “If there was one policy which strengthens the UK in every possible sense, it is building more ships for the Royal Navy”.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson has announced what the Ministry of Defence have called “the biggest investment in the UK’s Armed Forces since the end of the Cold War”, confirming an injection of £16.5 billion over four years.

Referring to his promise to “restore Britain’s position as the foremost naval power in Europe”, the Prime Minister added:

“If there was one policy which strengthens the UK in every possible sense, it is building more ships for the Royal Navy.”

Johnson today confirmed that the Royal Navy acquire 8 Type 26 Frigates, 5 Type 31 frigates, the “next generation” Type 32 frigates, the new Fleet Solid Support Ships and a new multi-role research vessel.

According to a press release from the Government:

“The £16.5 billion investment confirms our order of 8 Type 26 and 5 Type 31 frigates, commits us to the next generation Type 32, and supports the future solid support ships that will supply our Carrier Strike Group.

Whilst this is reassuring news for the defence industry, Defence will not overlook the challenges that are ahead, to continue addressing the savings still required and the efficiencies we need to make.”

The Government also said on Twitter:

“We will restore Britain’s position as the foremost naval power in Europe. New generations of warships will be built across the UK, from Glasgow and Rosyth, to Belfast, Appledore and Birkenhead.”

Defence Secretary Ben Wallace said:

“This is excellent news for Defence, and provides us with the financial certainty we need to modernise, plan for the future, and adapt to the threats we face. It demonstrates the Prime Minister’s recognition of how important Defence is to our resilience, and to the reputation of the United Kingdom.

This settlement secures UK jobs and livelihoods, allows us to invest in our fantastic shipyards and aerospace industry, spreading prosperity to every corner of the UK.

Next year represents a huge opportunity for this country, and Defence will be at the forefront of creating the jobs and business opportunities that will help us build back from the pandemic. Over the next few months, I will set out in more detail our ambitious agenda for Defence.”

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Captain P Wash

we are already.

Frank62

In many ways we’re barely equal with Italy, France & Turkey. Japan has a far larger navy than ours, as does India, S Korea & several others. We need to restore some of our lost strength so we can be a force to ensure the rule of law & safe trade on the high seas.

Sean

Japan, India, S Korea aren’t in Europe 🤷‍♂️

Damo

That was sentence 2. It was clear what Frank meant lol.

A few more ships won’t hurt us at all. Better coverage

Steve R

Japan doesn’t have fixed-wing aircraft carriers, SSNs or SSBNs. Probably a big part of why they have a larger military.

Daniele Mandelli

Exactly.

pkcasimir

Japan is in the process of converting two helicopter carriers into handling F-35Bs and has already ordered 42 F-35Bs from the US.

BB85

Japan doesn’t need range for its submarines, if I was given the choice of 6 SSN’s with only 3 available to go to war with or 18 AIP subs with 9 available it would be a no brainer.

BASRA

It needs range if it wants to be a global power.

Steve R

Japan isn’t interested in being a global power, though, so AIP is a good way to go for Japan.

Its most likely adversary is China, and that’s well within range of their AIP subs.

Steve R

To be honest I think we should split that down the middle:

Our 7 Astute/Trafalgar submarines, plus a class of, say, 6 AIP subs. They wouldn’t have the same range as the SSNs but for anything in North Sea, North Atlantic, even Mediterranean, they’d do nicely.

We could even permanently base one at HMS Juffair to extend their reach east.

Daveyb

Due to China’s building the two Type 001 and 002 Katzenov carriers and then building the Type 003 catobar, with possible another to follow. Japan are redeveloping their two Izumo “helicopter destroyers” into F35B light carriers. If China do get their catobar carrier to work, then I would not be surprised to see Japan build a purpose built carrier. Their post war constitution prohibits them having a carrier. But it was written before China had aspirations on becoming a super power. Their AIP SSKs are pretty good and they will be getting 10 of the new ones.

Robert Blay

Ship numbers isn’t everything, capability, and the quality of it’s personnel is what makes the RN stand out, and the ability to deploy and sustain world wide operations is the difference between the RN and the above mentioned countries.

Dennis Clouser

The Spanish Armada the the British defeated comes to mind

Jonathan

Green and brown water navies can be bigger than Blue water navies.It does not really matter as green and brown water Naval power only matters if someone is come for your homeland. There is only one navy in the world that out match’s the RN where it really matters in geopolitics. that’s in power projection to an equidistant or close to equidistant theatre of war. It does not matter how many more frigates a navy like the JDF has compared to the RN, geopolitic realities generally means navies will end up in action against each other a long way from… Read more »

BASRA

If your counting hulls as a basis for counting a navy then North Korea is the worlds preeminent naval power. 2 CV’s 2 LPD’s 7 SSN and 4 SSBN’s make us the preeminent blue water navy in Europe and second only to the USN in the world and that’s before this budget increase. No disrespect to Japan they have a navy much like ours in the 80’s but as we found out in 1982 sending an a navy consisting of lots of escorts with little AirPower won’t do much in force projections terms in an A2AD environment and fighting a… Read more »

BASRA

If your counting the Indian navy then HMS Belfast, Victory and Warrior should all be part of the RN.

Tim Uk

Erm Japan doesn’t have nuclear attack subs nor trident , never mind two aircraft carriers. But agree that more fully loaded type 45’s and frigates would be a big improvement.

Steve

Kinda depends if you consider Russia to be in Europe or not, i think they technically are and no chance we are going to overtake their navy.

Watcherzero

If you actually look at the servicable part of the Russian Navy, the vessels that can actually put to see if ordered I actually think its near parity in capital ships with them having an edge in submarines.

Their carrier programme has been suspended, destroyer programme cancelled, they have 6 frigates under construction with many they have built over the last two decades sold off to other countries as they cant get engine parts due to embargo.

Steve

It’s hard to compare as you say a lot of their navy is well past its best, but the sheer number of subs is what would make our navy useless in a war with them, we just don’t have enough frigates / subs to counter it.

Robert Blay

And how many of those subs are actually in service and capable of deploying and being of any use. Russian numbers can be very deceiving.

Steve

Based on the poor availability of our frigates and destroyers, i do wonder about the availability of our subs also

Steve R

But a war like that against Russia isn’t likely to be just us vs them.

Between us, Norway and the US we can dominate the North Sea, North Atlantic, and GIUK Gap with our own submarines, frigates and maritime patrol aircraft.

Steve

Was just commenting on the most powerful navy in Europe.

However, it won’t just be Russia though, it could easily be China and Russia plus others.

Jonathan

If you look at the Russian navy order of battle, it’s not as large as most people think. A lot of the boats are very iffy around being operational. If we wanted to play the same let’s pretend we have a big hunter killer fleet game Russia plays, we have a lot of tied up boats we could paint, stick a few sailors on and tow around. most of their nuclear boats were designed before I was born and are around my age and I’m not young. Even their new boats are dusted off programmes started by the USSR in… Read more »

River Rha

Well, Jonathan, In Advance of my Own Carefully Considered Contribution, More of Which Later, It would seem that “your Suggestion would seem to Have Parallels With the Dummy Fighting Equipment that the Combined Services Providers Ensured were placed in Prominent Locations Along the South Coast of Britain and Particularly During the Run Up to the Assault On The Normandy Beaches on D-Day and Onwards”. As I Understand It, From Long Deceased Cycling Club Acquaintances in Scotland, There were Massive Ammunition and Other Ordnance Dumps “Stacked High” Along Scottish Highways and Byways Located North of Glasgow and Outwards Towards Perthshire”, It… Read more »

geoff

Morning Steve-you would have to apportion Russia on the basis of land area between Europe and Asia and split their Naval strength along those lines in which case I think the RN would easily win! On the other hand if you did it on population then as I think most Russians reside in the West, then the Russian Navy might still have it! 🙂

AlexS

No you are not. French Navy is currently superior.

geoff

Morning AlexS-fighting talk! For starters 2 brand new big carriers versus your one medium size part timer.

AlexS

No AEW, no know-how, that is just starting to be rebuild now. It will take time.
French also have Scalp in FREMM, subs and can be launched by Rafale,

Callum

AEW is being regenerated, know how has been retained through deployments with the USN. Which, it should be mentioned, is exactly what the Marine Nationale has to do to keep their pilots current because they can’t maintain a CATOBAR wing alone.

The RN has more and and better destroyers, more submarines, the future T26 massively outguns the FREMM, we’ll have a full time carrier capacity armed with 5th gen aircraft, and our auxiliary fleet is far superior.

The only categories the French navy wins in are amphibious assault capability, minesweepers, and low level patrol vessels.

AlexS

“we are already.”

Is the first message in this topic. No you are not already there.

About destroyers the French already have the new missile i think and they are better close defended. You are right on quantity assuming they don’t break up…

Edd B

Alex lets take a look at hulls vs hulls right now SSBN’s both have 4 about the same age SSN’s New France 1 UK 4 SSN’s Old France 5 UK 3 Total Sub hulls France 10 UK 11 UK wins but also our hulls are newer Carriers France 1 UK 2 UK Wins also ours are bigger and newer Amphibious platforms France 3 UK 2 France wins plus yours are newer Destroyers France 5 UK 6 UK wins at least 3 of the French destroyers will be decommissioned in the next 2 years Frigates France 11 UK 13 Yours are… Read more »

Rob

That doesn’t mean much since it is only France and Italy that are anywhere near comparable. I would suggest they need to: Get more escorts into the fleet – T32 and the future destroyer sound good. Sort out the carrier support ships. Get good meaningful air groups onto the carrier, including AEW! Get Astute done and in service. Get Dreadnaught done and in service. Plan for and begin replacing the Albions & Bays – 2 LHPs best option. More maritime patrol aircraft. Maybe some SNs for training & SFs Lots to be done. I doubt they are looking beyond Trident,… Read more »

Robert Blay

A pretty big chunk of that lovely list has, or soon will be in service. Dreadnought is a good few years away.

James

Exactly what are came here to say but that sums up the dismal state of European naval forces rather than our massive superiority.

Hoping some of that money will go to up gunning some of the fleet we already have, new anti ship missiles/surface launched tlam and some more helicopters would be a start

Daniele Mandelli

Let’s wait and see. Lots of details to come.

So far, so good.

How will T32 be built alongside T26 T31? Is there spare capacity. Otherwise this uplift is far far away.

Captain P Wash

We have designed a Frigate building facility based around the Type 31 I think. This might just explain your question DM.

Rob

As the money is now perhaps they are looking at opening another line in England, maybe Northern Ireland? I know there is political pressure from Scotland but we can’t continue to build all RN warships in Scotland other than subs. Basically it’s not fair.

Daniele Mandelli

Agree. Scotland has T26, let’s use other sites.

My worry was how, given what I have read here over the months on the state of our yards.

Captain P Wash

We don’t build any Subs in Scotland though ?

Rob

I said, ‘other than subs.’ Also we won’t get an expansion of the surface fleet if we just queue them up for build in Scottish yards. I bet some people in the MOD are now regretting letting Appledore go under.

Captain P Wash

sorry, My fault, I misread your comment.

Paul.P

Shipbuilding in Belfast and Appledore were specifically mentioned by BJ. This might be a reference to the FSS ships – which lets face it are urgently needed for an effective carrier task force – and / or frigate blocks for assembly in Rosyth where I think the facilities will enable simultaneous assembly of 2 frigates. Not sure fairness comes into it. Babcock have built the ‘frigate factory’ and it keeps the cost down. I think Cammell Laird will be busy refitting T45s and building the proposed ‘multi-role research vessel’, whatever that is. I don’t know of BAE can build more… Read more »

Jon

HMS Scott is due for replacement. I assume one of the multi-role research vessels will fill that spot. Perhaps three ships will replace Scott and the Echo class, and will be larger than the Echos (5,000 tons) but smaller than Scott (13,500 tons).

Dern

STRN queried the Type 32 and apparently it’s a variant of Type 31, with potentially different weapons loadouts for export markets.

Dern
Daniele Mandelli

Makes sense. Keep things simple.

Sean

For it to be attractive for export markets I’d expect it to have a larger weapons fit compared to the current Type 31s. That also leaves the RN in future able to argue for funds to upgrade the Type 31s to Type 32 level.

Steve

Wasn’t the whole point of the T31 to be export focused with its original name of the t31e, the new export model makes no sense.

Jack

An export model of an export model doesn’t make sense to you ? You’ve never worked in the public sector procurement, have you ? 🙂 🙂 😉

Glass Half Full

Naval News also queried it and “Naval News learned from a reliable UK source that this is in fact some sort of “pre program” put in place for budgetary reasons in anticipation of a future potential “Type 31 Batch 2”. The source added that this potential “Type 31 Batch 2” may not necessarily be based on the Type 31 design.” I suspect the MoD will issue an RFI for something with specs/capabilities similar to the French FTI or Italian PPA Full/Light+. This doesn’t exclude Babcock offering a more capable T31 based solution, but allows other companies/consortia to bid. most if… Read more »

George

Hi Daniele, yes fully agree with that
A bit confusing on the defence budget
Can you experts advise please. The BBC and general media claim the UK Defence budget is currently £41BIL Having just checked the NATO budgets the UK is at £44.009BIl, I would put more faith in NATO’s figures, what do you say?
But this is good news and I did not expect the announcement given the current issue with the pandemic.
Just have to pace each step at a time.
Cheers
George

TrevorH

Possibly costs are set at different date datum…

Rob

£41 billion is core defence. £44 billion includes defence pensions etc, accepted by NATO as defence thus contributing to the 2% of GDP but not really is it?

Frank62

Very welcome news after decades of cuts, cuts & more cuts. We’ll need to watch carefully it is delivered, but hopefully this marks the end of the long rot of UK defences & a better, sustainable & capable RN.
Surprisingly widely welcomed on the BBC comments earlier. A lot more people do care about our forces than it felt for years. Even if the T32s are T31s with a proper weapons fit(Proper MG(5″), AshMs, larger amount of SAMs) they’ll be an excellent addition to the fleet. More investment to grow our tiny submarine fleeet will be very useful too.

Captain P Wash

Let’s hope they are Proper Frigates, fitted with Proper stuff. anti Airscraft and anti Sub stuff too.

Rob

Frank you are so right, people do care about defence. Politicians always go on about defence being unpopular but when we need it it is the most popular thing in the world. I think the Russian threat (Scripol, Ukraine, Syria, Arctic, ships in our waters, etc) has got to the point where most people want them to go do one. Putin is looking more and more like a threat as he clings to his retirement strategy.

Gavin Gordon

The oft quoted ‘sea blindness’ was always an empty phrase to my mind.

Paul C

Most ordinary voters do care about the country and its armed forces. They know that the cuts have gone too far. It is the hard left that is out of touch and incapable of understanding the people it claims to represent. Hence Corbyn’s dismal performance in the 2019 General Election!

andy

do we have a design for type 32 or are these a build for after the type 31/26 have been built

Paul42

I think they mean Tupe 31 batch 2. Babcock have invested a great deal of time and money in their Type 31 frogate factory, able to build 2 ships side by side. But the existing design is heavily underarmed and has no place in a carrier group. However, an upgraded version along the lines of the Danish version would…… First priority has to be the purchase and fitting of a decent anti-ship missile on existing hulls, and maybe long awaited addition of Mk41 vls to Type 45? Plus of course a far more rapid acquisition programme for F35B, and maybe… Read more »

SD67

Realistically –

Our SSNs and SSBNs are substantially larger than the French equivalent
Our carriers larger and we have two of them
DDGs twice as many (propulsion issues not withstanding), and Sampson is superior
RFA is much better
Amphips are probably a tie – Bays and LPDs vs Mistrals
The only area we’re arguably lacking is escort numbers, and that’s being addressed

BB85

The French definitely have a lot more patrol vessels but I’m not sure if they consider their border force as part of the navy. If we included our larger border force boats I think that would be around 9 OPV’s which where disappointingly ordered from abroad.

John Hampson

Now divert money wasted on the Foreign Aid budget to build, in the UK, a couple of dual purpose hospital/relief ships that could also support military operations. And fund their future manning and operations with money from the FA budget.

TrevorH

I’ve read we are cutting overseas aid to 0.5%. The Guardian editor choked on his cornflakes.

Rob

Yes 0.2 off aid and 0.2 on defence. No magic money tree just relocation.

Sean

So much for the doomsayers that only a couple of weeks ago were forecasting massive cuts to defence and the Royal Navy in particular.

Captain P Wash

Labour Types ?

Paul C

The predicted cuts included both carriers, the Dreadnought SSBNs and T26 capped at 3 ships I seem to remember. Somewhat ironic given that these were always the least likely to be cancelled!

Daniele Mandelli

These are people who either don’t have a clue what they’re talking about, trolls, or those with a grudge who want to see the UKs demise and fall. ( plenty of those, sadly)

I myself thought T26 might end up at 6 and more T31 ordered in their stead. I hope I remain totally wrong!

Steve R

This is definitely great news! Hopefully these new Type 32s will be up-gunned, more capable versions of the Type 31 frigates. Say a 5″ gun, 24x Sea Ceptor and 8 anti ship missiles, as a minimum to make them a credible general-purpose escort ship capable of being an asset as part of a carrier group. Perhaps looking too far into the future but hopefully this budget boost, whilst happening over the next four years, isn’t a one-off and will continue after that. When it comes to the new Type 4X destroyer hopefully they will order at least 8-9 to boost… Read more »

TrevorH

I don’t see that we need 8 or 9 T4X

Large AA destroyers, effectively cruisers… 4 to support the carriers. Surely better to have something like the Hobart class to back them up…. is this the T32?

An appropriate developed T31 (even if this is the T32) could be part of a carrier group.

But this is the first mention of a T32 I’ve seen on pages like this.

Steve R

Reducing to 4 would be a big mistake IMO. It would mean availability is drastically reduced. It would be a push to get 2 available to support a carrier. And if we lost one in combat we’re screwed. IMO we do need additional T4X destroyers to ensure at least 3 available to support the carrier in operations against a peer enemy and to be able to cope with any losses. I suppose we could keep it to 6 as long as the destroyers are used purely as air defence escorts and not for other roles, that these Type 32 frigates… Read more »

Glass Half Full

I suspect that provided BAES don’t get greedy, then T4X is likely to use the T26 platform and support at least 6x ships. It will be a proven platform for advanced AAW/BMD radar fit by the time its required. The Canadian Surface Combatant is already designed to address high end AAW and ASW as a ‘Super GP Frigate’, although a little light on VLS cells for AAW. The Australian Hunter class already has the radar fit for AAW so it wouldn’t surprise me to see T26 become their AAW solution long term, initially adding to and then replacing Hobart class… Read more »

DJ

Not only more at the bow, but if you are prepared to forgo the multi mission space for boat bays, then considerably more space becomes available.

BB85

I would like to see more of our surface ships equipped with TLAM. I think European navies avoided adding this in case it was seen as too aggressive, but Russian and Chinese ships launched over the last decade have been armed to teeth so I no longer see them as optional.

Steve R

I’d prefer anti-ship missiles, personally.

But yes, any extra offensive capability would be nice.

Glass Half Full

Well with FC/ASW we’d presumably have both.

Steve

Main problem is Boris is on his way out and its generally considered he will leave or be ousted early next year, so this money may never actually appear.

TrevorH

Yawn

Jack

Dream on.

John Clark

I keep hearing this nonsense, one would assume it’s origins started in yet another tired tirade of left wing vitriol from the Guardian…

Steve R

Why is he on his way out?

He’s not that popular at the moment but he still has the control and the confidence of Parliament. It’s when a Prime Minister consistently fails to pass legislation through Parliament that there are votes of no confidence. That’s not what is happening at the moment to Boris.

Not to mention that with Dominic Cummings gone, Boris’ image might improve slightly.

Steve

Because the popularity of the party has been hit hard due to his terrible handling of covid and brexit, and politicians only care about one thing, and that is keeping the gravy train going.

john melling

I’ve certainly got no complaints about BJ, he has 68 million British people to look after, plus commonwealth and the rest of the world to help out.

“Terrible handling of corvid”……..nonsense and as for BREXIT well in the new year we begin a new chapter in British history and NOW a boost in defence spending
Glad Labour are not in charge ;P

John Clark

Well said John, people will never be happy.. Despite what the Guardian and sorry Labour party say, the Government has done it’s very best by the people of this wonderful country. The virus has spread simply because some people haven’t bloody behaved themselves, nothing the government can do about that, we don’t live in a country were the police can put the boot in if you don’t follow the rules, thank god! The Conservative Government has done it’s level best, paying people’s wages and bailing out businesses in a remarkable unprecedented way, I for one thank them for all their… Read more »

Alan Reid

John M & John C You don’t need to be a Guardian reader to recognise that the UK has significantly the highest number of deaths in Europe. We’ve been hearing a lot from Mister Johnson about British exceptionalism since 2016 – perhaps this is another (dreadful) example? I don’t share your complacency. Clearly, the handling of the first wave could have been better. And I don’t only include England & Wales in that observation, but the devolved administrations – particularly Scotland, despite Ms Sturgeon’s bluster. “The Conservative Government has done it’s level best, paying people’s wages and bailing out businesses… Read more »

John Clark

I appreciate your view point Alan and would agree to be honest, it doesn’t really matter who was in charge, the results would have been about the same….. That said, the blame for the spread in the UK can squarely be placed on the section of the population who have taken the piss all the way through. In the Far East deaths are low, because people have done as they are told. Not the Governments fault, if people aren’t clever enough to follow simple bloody instructions to mitigate risk (that for some reason they still cant grasp) Then Darwinian rules… Read more »

captain p wash

surely Blame should be directed at China though. ?

Daniele Mandelli

They’ve made mistakes. Which western liberal democracy hasn’t? Lock down? HMG is ruining the economy! No lockdown, HMG is spreading covid and only care for the economy, not people’s lives! Testing? Oh, Germany tests so much more than us. Well yes, as we started with pretty much zero and ramping this up takes time, Germany already had extensive labs. They cannot win. Yes, screw ups with PPE, screw ups with school exams. Would be no different which party was in charge. I think you’ll find it is many of the UKs population who have handled Covid terribly, as at no… Read more »

Andy P

Can’t argue with any of that, government’s will make mistakes, they’re all trying to feel their way through this and different countries will have to deal with it slightly differently. It boils my piss when folk flag up County A doing this or County B doing that. Same with pointing out the flaws in the UK policies like “well if I can go to the pub why can’t I go to the football”. We’re an incredibly spoilt and decadent bunch in The West, its great, I love that 99.9% of the time but its not a great starting point for… Read more »

captain p wash

I’ve missed not being able to agree with you mate. I agree whole heartedly. Have an upvote……. oh hang on !

Daniele Mandelli

Don’t start that caper again captain! That was carnage!

captain p wash

It was mate but It was for the good of this site. Now we can either choose to ignore a comment if we disagree or engage in debate rather than all that silly down voting.

River Rha

As a Lifelong Scotsman, Persuaded by Life Experiences to Remain In My Native Country, It would seem that I Would Not Be Surprised if Boris “All Bluster and Doesn’t Come Up With “the Goods” Before His Ship Sails….”

Expat

Not really surprised the easiest way to help industry and not open up the whole debate about subsidies is to invest in defence. Most countries recognise defence as a national interest and not open to international competition laws.

Albion

Returning the capital cost of the new Trident submarines to pre 2010 arrangements would help with the apparent £31 billion equipment budget blackhole.

captain p wash

Is it £31 billion now then ? Wow.

Daniele Mandelli

Nope. The worst forecast i read is 13 billion. It may be a lot less.
The 31 billion I suspect is either a typo or the amount that submarines get in the 10 year plan.
Albions point is spot on mind.

Albion

My typo

Levi Goldsteinberg

Yeah, we are already. Indisputably. But I appreciate the message

Paul.P

“If there was one policy which strengthens the UK in every possible sense, it is building more ships for the Royal Navy.” Strengthen the Union, enhance relations with the US and EU navies, our technology and industrial base, create jobs, apply foreign policy goals, counter Russian ambitions in Sudan, Turkish ambitions in Libya and Cyprus, Chinese ambitions everywhere from Mozambique to the Philippines and Galapagos. Absolutely delighted with this news. Lights have come on. Well done Boris. Spot on comment from the PM. Infrastrata’s Belfast H&W and Appledore shipbuilding mentioned specifically. As was Cammell Laird. National Shipbuilding strategy becoming a… Read more »

John Clark

Well said Paul….

dan

Will believe that when I see it.

David Flandry

The PMs # would only keep the status quo.
Comparing the UK to Europe is not so great, since Europe has fallen in numbers also. I remember when people lamented the RN having only 40 destroyers/frigates.

captain p wash

Numbers aren’t the be all and end all though, take 1982, we had the numbers but not the equipment. I’m not trying to detract from the RN or Argentine forces but the UK was lucky in oh so many ways. A re-run today would be totally different though as the UK’s capability per ship is way beyond anything even remotely threatening. Even taking in any like for like development in Argentine Defence.

Rcrawforth

A big fish in a small pond then.

Steve

The real question is where is the crew going to come from, if we can’t crew all 19 of the current vessels.

Meirion X

The new vessels will require less crew, e.g. T31 about 100, T26 about 150.

Meirion X

I mean each vessel.

captain p wash

I strongly believe that the running down of the entire Armed Forces over the Decades made people think twice about a career in this field. hopefully we will now see some confidence and a new direction being taken by our young men and women.

Albion

Good news maybe, but ‘we’ need to get these things built in a reasonable time. I know there are budget restaints and lead times, and of course recruitment, but as Soviet Admiral Nikolai Sergeyev, (I think), said some decades ago, “the next naval war will be fought by ships which hulls are already in the water.” or words to that effect.

Barry Curtis

The government has now shown a little insight into how it sees the future direction of the armed forces with – Space Command and the National Cyber Force being the prime tools to defend our shores, along with the type 32 frigate that is earmarked to bolster the ranks of our surface fleet, bringing the hulls in the water to twenty-four ships. It certainly is a good step forward, but I can’t help feeling that manning may become more of an issue that will require the naval reserves to step up, and also that the other classes of naval ships… Read more »