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£1.1 billion is to be invested to continue the modernisation of military flying training in the UK.

The new ‘Fixed Wing flying training system’ is set to provide modern aircraft as well as modern ground based training devices such as simulators across the Royal Air Force, Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm and Army Air Corps.

The deals covers the procurement of a three new aircraft types. This includes 23 the Grob G120TP to be named the “Prefect”, 10 Beechcraft T-6C and 5 Embraer Phenom 100.

Minister of State for Defence Procurement Philip Dunne said:

“This is fantastic news for the future of our military aircrew, providing them with a modern training system which will equip them to deliver on the front line.

With our strong commitment to air power as part of the Strategic Defence and Security Review and our investment of £178 billion in equipment over the next 10 years, this contract is further proof of our commitment to invest in the UK’s defence capabilities for the future, ensuring that we continue to be a world leader in military flying training.”

Air Marshal Sir Baz North, the Senior Responsible Owner for UKMFTS, added:

“The UK MFTS Fixed Wing Contract provides enhanced synthetic and live flying training for the UK’s military aircrew out to 2033. The service employs modern, adaptable and sustainable systems which exploit the advantages of the simulated environment to prepare our aircrew to meet the challenges of future combat operations.”

Air Vice-Marshal Sue Gray, Director of Combat Air at the MOD’s Defence Equipment & Support said:

“This contract will replace legacy fleets of aircraft with new, modern platforms that better replicate the aircraft used by front line operational squadrons.

Up-to-date training methods will also be developed to ensure that students are able to progress to operational training more efficiently and provide value for money.”

According to the MoD, this new fixed-wing flying training contract should be fully operational in 2019 and run through to 2033.

6 COMMENTS

  1. Indeed, its basically a German, an American and a Brazilian aircraft replacing a German, a Brazilian and an American aircraft (though admittedly the Tucanos that are being replaced were licence-built here).

  2. No mention here of the winning bidder. Having rustled around a bit, it would appear to be ‘Affinity’, a consortium of Kellogg Brown & Root and Elbit Systems. So that’s one (‘Accent’) for the training itself and this one for procurement and maintenance. Why do these PFIs have to be so complicated? I’m sure it costs us more in the end.

  3. Are 23 Grob G120TP, 10 Beechcraft T-6C and 5 Embraer Phenom 100 enough to fill the needs of the reformed squadrons? It seems like very low numbers.

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