The USS Arleigh Burke (DDG 51), an Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer, has returned to Naval Station Rota, Spain, from its fourth Forward Deployed Naval Forces-Europe (FDNF-E) patrol, according to a press release from the U.S. Navy.

The ship completed its patrol on May 29, 2024, after departing Rota in November 2023 following extensive repairs and upgrades.

During its comprehensive Surface Incremental Availability (SIA), $17.5 million worth of repairs, alterations, and installations were made to the ship’s engineering, weapons, and combat systems.

The ship began its patrol by completing a Mobility-Engineering (MOB-E) certification in the Bay of Cadiz, where it played a key role in the 2023 European Air-Missile Defense Exercise (EAMDEX).

This exercise involved the U.S. Air Force, Army, and Space Force, along with NATO allies.

The ship then transited the Strait of Gibraltar and joined the Gerald R. Ford Carrier Strike Group (CSG), participating in various operations and exercises. Following this, the Arleigh Burke returned to Rota for inter-patrol Training and Maintenance Availability (TRAV) before redeploying to the eastern Mediterranean Sea in January 2024.

In the eastern Mediterranean, the ship joined the Bataan Amphibious Readiness Group (BATARG), demonstrating U.S. Navy capabilities to media outlets including ABC, CBS, and BBC. The Arleigh Burke also participated in the NATO exercise Dynamic Manta, an anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare exercise aimed at enhancing interoperability among Allied nations.

In April, the Arleigh Burke, alongside USS Carney (DDG 64), supported U.S. Central Command in intercepting and destroying multiple UAVs and ballistic missiles targeting Israel.

The ship also conducted escort operations for humanitarian efforts in Gaza. Throughout the patrol, the crew made port visits to Souda Bay, Greece, and Cyprus, hosting dignitaries including U.S. Ambassador to Cyprus Julie Fisher and Vice Adm. Thomas Ishee, Commander, U.S. Sixth Fleet.

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George has a degree in Cyber Security from Glasgow Caledonian University and has a keen interest in naval and cyber security matters and has appeared on national radio and television to discuss current events. George is on Twitter at @geoallison
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Jon
Jon (@guest_827708)
15 days ago

Completes a tour of Europe makes it sounds like it went everywhere in Europe, as opposed to didn’t get as far North as Portugal. However, it also sounds like it had a busy deployment.

There are four forward deployed A-B destroyers in Europe. The US managed to send one to Baltops, the Paul Ignatius, which feels like it should be the name of Pope. Did we even send a P2000?

Last edited 15 days ago by Jon
Steven B
Steven B (@guest_827711)
15 days ago
Reply to  Jon

To be 5 by the end of the year as USS Oscar Austin prepares for an October ‘homeport shift’ to Rota.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore (@guest_827720)
15 days ago
Reply to  Jon

Amazing that this is the 53rd time BALTOPS has been held – shows the longevity and strength of NATO. It runs until tomorrow. NATO website said that there was UK participation, but I have not found out what it amounts to. In 2018 we sent 7 x P2000s.

Jon
Jon (@guest_827723)
15 days ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Yes, but that wasn’t all we sent in 2018. We typically send at least one escort or an Albion and maybe one or two MCM as well. We have sent the LRG(N) in the recent past so a Bay class might go. This year the UK did participate. We sent some Royal Marines, but all the pictures have been of them on Swedish boats. That might be because we didn’t send the ships, or just because this is the first Baltops since Sweden’s accession. There are also usually aerial operations and it wouldn’t be the first time RAF participated. I’ve… Read more »

Last edited 15 days ago by Jon
Graham Moore
Graham Moore (@guest_827827)
15 days ago
Reply to  Jon

Thanks Jon. My info on 2018 came from Navy News – I hoped it would be comprehensive.

It seems that BALTOPS was originally envisaged as primarily a USN training or even a test exercise, with attendance by other participating nations being secondary.

Glad we sent some Royals at least, but might our credibility be damaged if we don’t send any ships when smaller nations can manage to do so?

Frank62
Frank62 (@guest_827965)
14 days ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Recklessly reducing our forces to their current size has exactly reduced out credibility, no matter what spin or facile claims by HMG. Not much ambition either to redress the situation in the face of aggresion by our enemies.