BAE Systems has acquired In-Space Missions, a UK company that designs, builds and operates satellites and satellite systems.

BAE say that this acquisition is part of their strategy to develop breakthrough technologies, “pursuing bolt-on acquisitions where they complement existing capabilities and provide an opportunity to accelerate technology development in key areas, as evidenced with recent acquisitions such as Prismatic, Techmodal and PPM Ltd”.

Amanda Solloway, Minister for Science, Research and Innovation, said:

“This acquisition is a great vote of confidence in our thriving space sector. By bringing on board the expertise of In-Space Missions, BAE Systems will help to expand the UK’s capabilities in low earth orbit satellites, creating valuable export opportunities, while keeping this country at the forefront of a new commercial space age.”

Ben Hudson, Chief Technology Officer at BAE Systems, said:

“The UK has an opportunity to be a global player in the growing low earth orbit space market, as well as servicing its own sovereign defence and commercial needs. This acquisition will allow us to combine a range of space capabilities that help deliver information advantage, multi-domain operations and networking for our customers. We look forward to welcoming the In-Space Missions team to BAE Systems.”

Doug Liddle, CEO of In-Space Missions, added:

“This agreement means In-Space Missions will maintain its small company culture while leveraging the tremendous scale and new opportunities offered by BAE Systems. We’re already collaborating on new highly secure satellite applications and beyond that, we’re really excited about how this agreement will underpin our growth as an ambitious, UK-owned, prime and service provider.”

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Farouk
Farouk
23 days ago

Well rather a British company than a Foreign one, which appears to be this governments major remit regards selling off British stuff.

Andy P
Andy P
22 days ago
Reply to  Farouk

I know BAE are ‘technically’ a British company but these big companies are a law unto themselves really. I don’t take any solace when I read that ‘BIG company A’ has bought ‘small company z’. But then, I’m a miserable bugger.

Barry Larking
Barry Larking
22 days ago
Reply to  Andy P

Far from it. You are clear eyed. I suspect the government has finally woken up to implications of the steady acquisition of British talent by overseas companies and wants to head this one into a safe place. But BAE hasn’t always convinced. The bigger companies become the less agile they are and modern technology is nothing if not fleet of foot. I feel some protection of smaller innovators in the U.K. is required starting with a ‘Not For Sale’ sign.

Reaper
Reaper
22 days ago
Reply to  Barry Larking

It’s a Shame so many British company’s get bought then the assets get stripped and moved, or the company’s divided up then sold. Or BAE comes in buys it then doesnt do anything but let them rot then close them all together in the end. And I’ve never understood why the government pretty much just says “it’s business” if a decent British company’s struggling or about to close or about to be bought by foreign company then the British brand disappears. The GOV should protect British company’s and brands and stop letting them disappear. Look at our Aeroplane industry, motorbike… Read more »

Barry Larking
Barry Larking
22 days ago
Reply to  Reaper

Precisely. Our debts in 1945 were stupendous; they had been halved by 1955 due entirely to British industry. The U.K. had 75 per cent of the world’s motor cycle market for example. To say ‘we lost our way’ is an understatement beyond any. ARM was sold by the same CEO who sold Pilkington’s Glass to the same country, Japan where he had many friendships. Pilkington’s breakthrough was being able to make huge sheets of float glass using molten tin. This was a world first. The reason so many small companies go abroad is simple; the City of London makes huge… Read more »

Reaper
Reaper
22 days ago
Reply to  Barry Larking

I still don’t know why we let Germany off with all the money it owed us after ww2!l And We only just paid back usa recently..

Maybe Germany should remember that every time it asks for money for the EU..nI wonder how much it still owes us..it seems like UK was shafted after WW2…

Barry Larking
Barry Larking
22 days ago
Reply to  Reaper

The one country that fought on every day of the war paid for it. A 1950s British film ‘The Mouse that Roared’ was a satire based on this fact. A mythical tiny central European country decides the way to wealth and happiness is to declare war on the U.S.A. and loose …

Douglas Newell
Douglas Newell
21 days ago
Reply to  Reaper

Yes, we only paid back our US WW2 debt recently. It was a great a headline. However, it could have been paid back years ago.
The instruments used to service it had very low interest rates, so they had been kept while others with higher rates paid off. The WW2 debt was only paid off after UK rates fell to such low rates that many long-standing debts were paid off as the rates for the new debt was actually lower.

The UK Is Paying Centuries-Old War Debts (businessinsider.com)

farouk
farouk
21 days ago
Reply to  Reaper

After the Falkland’s war we acquired a load of Mercedes G wagons the argies had bought . They did try to disable them by removing the key slot for the ignition , but we found out that if yous tuck a pencil (or pen) inside the slot you could start the motor.. Anyway the Germans asked for them to be handed over to them. Told them to sling their hook

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
22 days ago
Reply to  Barry Larking

Indeed I remember Herman Hauser expressing how depressing he found it that Britain seems incapable of backing and holding on to its successful high tech businesses referring to the sale abroad of Arm the company he helped set up so many years ago. When foreign born entrepreneurs lament such things you really should start to question simply getting quick short term bucks under the guise of ‘investing in Britain’ when in reality its selling off your expertise and future in exploiting it to a foreign power who clearly value what it can do for them more than we do and… Read more »

Barry Larking
Barry Larking
22 days ago
Reply to  Spyinthesky

Thank you. I agree. Please read my reply to Reaper above.
Regards

Farouk
Farouk
22 days ago
Reply to  Andy P

Aren’t we all.😀

Tommo
Tommo
22 days ago
Reply to  Farouk

Satellites, with built-in hyposonic darts incorporated for sat to sat missions “Who would kniw” even though Earth orbit is supposedly a weapon free zone Someone has probably written a feasibility study paper on it by now

Farouk
Farouk
22 days ago
Reply to  Tommo

Study paper? I k ow of 2 films on the subject
spies like us
space cowboys.

and let’s be honest, pretty sure the Russians and Chinese have thought about it.

Tommo
Tommo
22 days ago
Reply to  Farouk

Forget hollywood , or Reagans Star Wars project But in the last 30yrs China has gone from Noodle producer ,behind the Bamboo curtain to a somewhat Corporate espionage world Leader whilst keeping an expression less pose. Most Nations worked helped funded The I.S.S now China building Her own the curtain has gone up again what are they doing what can’t be done on the I S.S

Reaper
Reaper
22 days ago
Reply to  Tommo

Im not sure I would trust a whole built Chinese space station…Would be terrifying. And let’s hope a new ISS gets built and it’s not just the Chinese who have one orbiting Earth. And I hope the UK gets more involved this time.

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
22 days ago
Reply to  Tommo

World Domination indeed Solar System Domination judged by what they are working on.

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
22 days ago
Reply to  Tommo

Well there are satellites up there now that the Americans suspect are killer satellites they even attached a shotgun of sorts to their first space station which they did test just before it fell into the atmosphere to see if it worked. The Indians of course recently tested an anti satellite weapon which was called reckless by the US. I’m sure China has all manner of things aimed at taking out satellites as that’s more than anything what gives the US a strategic advantage.

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
22 days ago
Reply to  Farouk

Well they call it ‘investment’ in Britain though how you can call as an example a foreign acquisition of Cadbury as investment in Britain is beyond me when that investment is fundamentally the buying price being payed (so some benefit in the pocket true) but thereafter not only is some production moved abroad losing jobs but suddenly its tax liabilities mostly head off shore too to make the savings they therefore need to make to pay for it, so less to the exchequer too. Whoever is gaining from that investment in Britain it certainly is not the taxpayer as a… Read more »

Johan
Johan
22 days ago
Reply to  Farouk

BAEs is not British, its is more an international company, its shareholders are very much international.

simon
simon
21 days ago
Reply to  Johan

However the UK government owns a golden share that say no foreign person or persons acting together may own more than 15% of the company shares.

Dern
Dern
22 days ago

I miss the “space” tab.

Glass Half Full
Glass Half Full
22 days ago
Reply to  Dern

Indeed. This article seems to be just tagged with “News” so once its off the front page it will probably just disappear, unless pulled up by an appropriate search term. Doesn’t seem too much to ask to have Space as a sub-section under Air, given its criticality to defence. Personally I could care less about The OSINT Bunker and Newsletter sections. The Analysis section can be interesting except the content for that whole category has also disappeared into the ether. Presumably due to a web site re-org gone awry for some reason that has also broken the title bar.

Reaper
Reaper
22 days ago

I would love BAE to build and launch Rockets, one can dream. Also I’ve not heard much about the Sutherland Spaceport recently, I hope it’s under construction.

And the UK should set up a heavy launch facility, the Space sectors only going to grow and we should invest more just like Japan, India, China, France, Russia, Germany are.

Are we still building the astronaut training facility on that old RAF base?, with that huge deep training pool?. Would Bermuda or another UK Caribbean island be suitable to launch heavy possibly manned rockets??

Tommo
Tommo
22 days ago
Reply to  Reaper

I thought that it was a toss up between Cornwall and Sutherland ,the thing with this is it could turn into a political issue like shipbuilding moving up to Scotland at the last Indref 2015 to keep the union the same thing could happen again .Please correct me if I’m wrong

Richard Graham
Richard Graham
22 days ago
Reply to  Tommo

I understand the government is working on plans to facilitate the creation of space launch sites located within the UK with seven sites in the UK preparing to apply for spaceport operating licences. Of the seven proposed sites, 3 will be vertical launch sites and 4 for horizontal launches. Five are the sites are in Scotland (Hebrides, Shetland, Sutherland, Ayrshire and Kintyre), one in North Wales and one in Cornwall. Several spaceports have already got their first customers lined up and are anticipating their first launches as soon as they have obtained operating licences. Vertical launches involve the ‘traditional’ method… Read more »

blog-launchuk-spaceport-sites2-2.jpg
Reaper
Reaper
22 days ago
Reply to  Tommo

Sutherlands already been picked mate but I’ve not heard much on how the building of the launch facility’s going. Sutherland will launch one small satellite type payload per month. I live next to the company that’s building the rockets in Forres 3D printing many of the parts, cool stuff cant wait for launches https://www.hie.co.uk/our-region/regional-projects/space-hub-sutherland/ And the RAFs new Radar Technology that monitors Northern Europe at Saxa Vord possibly helped Shetland to get its own space hub to launch satellites should actually have been opened by now just like Sutherland but the virus obviously delayed plans. So there will be two… Read more »

Last edited 22 days ago by Reaper
Tommo
Tommo
22 days ago
Reply to  Reaper

Thanks Reaper for that hope Cornwall gets its independence

Damo
Damo
22 days ago
Reply to  Tommo

You’ve got huge oil reserves, make more for the UK than you take and can keep the pound so why not!

Tommo
Tommo
22 days ago
Reply to  Damo

CORNWALL ?

Reaper
Reaper
22 days ago
Reply to  Tommo

Lol, You can live and hope.., never been to Cornwall might have to take a trip down. 👍

Tommo
Tommo
22 days ago
Reply to  Reaper

Did my training there , now it’s a holiday destination apparently ,Haven’t the faintest idea why lol

geoff
geoff
22 days ago
Reply to  Reaper

Morning Reaper. Ascension Island would be perfect for a British heavy launch facility

Tommo
Tommo
22 days ago
Reply to  geoff

Nearest to the Equator straight up less fuel required, Gérard Bull saw that principle, for the HARP gun in Barbados

Reaper
Reaper
22 days ago
Reply to  geoff

Morning Geoff, ok that’s it Decided then when do we start building s😂👍

geoff
geoff
21 days ago
Reply to  Reaper

When the yanks finish repairing the runway 😂

Tommo
Tommo
21 days ago
Reply to  geoff

Then it will be “Wideawke ” With that Noise from heavy lift rockets good job their’s no neighbours too complain ,,,,,,,,,, then that’s sorted Geoff ,Reaper unlucky Cornwall

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
22 days ago
Reply to  Tommo

Scotland (more than one site potentially) is home to vertical lift with at least two somewhat Novel British rockets in development for micro satellites of which we have a substantial world position in producing and Spaceport Cornwall is the base for horizontal lift with Virgin Orbit already lined up to use it. Early days but rumours of other high profile companies interested too in both which are ideally suited for launch or recovery for missions requiring a Northerly location and servicing European clients for payload and US rocket producers. Cornwall is hoping that Dreamchaser will use it for landings in… Read more »

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
22 days ago
Reply to  Reaper

Would have thought Belize or Guyana would in theory be best superficially the latter being right next door to the Ariane launch sight but no real chance of us getting involved in heavy lift and even if we were why compete with something which has never made money indeed loses money each Ariane launch and which is now due to Space X, Vulcan, Rocket Lab and various other new far cheaper and advanced US players has led to a new massive decade long investment from ESA to just save the whole project from collapse by trying to introduce reusable elements… Read more »

Reaper
Reaper
22 days ago
Reply to  Spyinthesky

We can make money of the small satellite launches though. It’s a shame we can’t get involved in the heavy lift Rockets, even if it doesnt make money it could sustain a huge new industry and what it costs will be well worth the sector growth in UK. 
We should start designing a new British rocket. But we have Skylon if we havent sold it to the yanks yet, and Skylon plane looks great and would have been great if Richard Branson would have partnered with his virgin galactic company.. I hope Skylon is progressing well…

Jason M Holmes
Jason M Holmes
22 days ago
Reply to  Reaper

I have a feeling Skylon will never happen, just a test bed for component development and sold to other companies, the margin for it to be competitive as a low earth orbit vehicle delivery system is getting very close, especially with the reusable systems from Space X et al. I fear we have left that area too late to exploit, I feel its main use now is hypersonic passenger transport, potentially much more profitable, Thunderbirds are GO

Reaper
Reaper
22 days ago
Reply to  Jason M Holmes

The thing is space x has been”busted” loads of times with its claims v reality. And the Reusable Rockets are dangerous and cost just as much and take up just as much resources as a new one to get flying again, and in the end they are total rebuilds anyways with all new parts, except your using a rocket shell that’s been used and put through hell so it’s going to be at a higher risk of loss than a new one. Reusable sounds great but it has major downsides.

Tommo
Tommo
20 days ago
Reply to  Jason M Holmes

Test beds for tuture developments in engine tech like Cumbria and the Isle of Wight was in 50ts and 60ts now just forgotten engineering places

Sean
Sean
22 days ago
Reply to  Reaper

Development of Sabre is going well, with big players like RR investing in it. We’ll probably first see it’s technology being used in other applications before we if ever see Skylon. It’s possible we might see Sabre’s unique air-cooling technology incorporated in the engines for Tempest, or even in upgrades for Typhoon/F35.

Reaper
Reaper
22 days ago
Reply to  Sean

Imagine a fighter bomber that’s engines can keep performing when up almost into space..
Yeah the Sabre engine looks to be doing good and RR joining is huge so let’s progress.
And we need to properly get behind the Skylon passenger type plane..build a prototype. There’s millitary applications for Skylon. But we need big investors if the government won’t fund it properly.
And Sadly Usa is the only nation that can afford these types of millitary projects..and I heard the chinese were making a copy of the sabre engine..or trying to.

Sean
Sean
22 days ago
Reply to  Reaper

I think the technology application is to improve performance at existing altitudes rather than build a space fighter-bomber 😉

Something like Skylon doesn’t take an insurmountable amount of money. Look what SpaceX has planned with their Starship programme! The vast majority financed by the success of their Falcon commercial programme and Elon’s pockets.
Certainly an unmanned Skylon, like the USAF’s X-37B, is achievable relatively easily… once Sabre is fully operational. The engines are the only novel technology required.

Reaper
Reaper
22 days ago
Reply to  Spyinthesky

Shame we didn’t keep our South American territory like the French have…

Sean
Sean
22 days ago
Reply to  Reaper

French Guiana is 4 degrees North of the Equator.

Ascension Island is 8 degrees South, so almost as good for launches and arguably more secure if you want to use them for military launches.
Alternatively, in the Indian Ocean we have Diego Garcia at 7 degrees South but logistics and available land might be issues.

Last edited 22 days ago by Sean
Tams
Tams
22 days ago
Reply to  Reaper

So would many in Guyana, I suspect. It’s incredibly poor and now the Chinese are getting their claws into them.

Sean
Sean
22 days ago
Reply to  Spyinthesky

Exactly, why should the U.K. taxpayers’ money be wasted on trying to deliver rockets when we can buy launches more cheaply from a private company (SpaceX) that has more advanced rockets than any government backed organisation.
If the French want to waste their money reinventing the wheel then let them 🤷‍♂️

Reaper
Reaper
22 days ago
Reply to  Sean

It could kick start a whole new Industry worth billions in the UK and bring in lots of investment, just because others do it doesn’t mean we shouldn’t. We build satellites now we should be able to launch, but looks like we will only be a small, satellite launcher for the next decade.

Sean
Sean
22 days ago
Reply to  Reaper

That’s as ridiculous as saying British Airways should design and build its own passenger jets. SpaceX has done what NASA and ESA have been incapable of doing, building a reusable heavy launcher. NASA has its ridiculous SLS which throws away $1bn of hardware each launch, and ESA is hoping the new Ariane 6 might be part reusable someday. But you think a U.K. government agency could succeed where NASA, ESA, etc have all failed….?!? 🤣 Launching is now a commodity business thanks to the private sector. The real money is building satellites, which essentially is still a custom process. But… Read more »

Tommo
Tommo
18 days ago
Reply to  Spyinthesky

French Guyana, too European, and at this present time we’re not on he French goodwill list