HMS Richmond will be joined by a task force of Royal Navy ships to deter threats to critical undersea cables, pipelines and other assets.

According to a Royal Navy statement, her arrival comes as six additional ships will join a task force to patrol an area from the English Channel to the Baltic Sea in an agreement between Joint Expeditionary Force nations to ensure stability and deter threats to critical undersea cables, pipelines and other assets.

“The UK contribution to the deployment will include frigates HMS Richmond and HMS Somerset, offshore patrol vessels HMS Tyne and HMS Severn and mine countermeasures vessels HMS Cattistock, HMS Penzance, as well as a Royal Fleet Auxiliary landing ship RFA Mounts Bay – supported by a Royal Air Force P-8 Poseidon maritime patrol aircraft.

The group will deploy soon to launch the joint patrols and will work together to carry out deterrent patrol in areas of key interest, as well as to deepen surveillance around offshore assets and share intelligence. “

Richmond’s Commanding Officer Commander Chris L’Amie said:

“We all rely on critical underwater infrastructure, for our internet, power and fuel supplies. Supporting the resilience of these systems while working together for mutual regional security is essential. The ship’s company and I are proud to have the opportunity to strengthen our bonds with fellow JEF nations. The JEF framework is a testament to the enduring strength of partnerships and the importance of international military cooperation to promote Euro-Atlantic security.”

A further statement reads:

“On her way to the Baltic, HMS Richmond stopped in the Swedish port city of Gothenburg to top-up on stores and was greeted into the city by Swedish Armed Forces small boats. While there, the Devonport-based ship took the chance to boost UK relationships with JEF partners by hosting delegates on board to discuss ideas on regional security. The Joint Expeditionary Force is made up of ten like-minded nations led by the UK – it includes Norway, Denmark, Finland, Estonia, Iceland, Latvia, Lithuania, the Netherlands and Sweden.

Together, they react to events in northern Europe’s waters, ready to respond to crises and world events. To ensure they’re ready for any eventuality, training and exercises regularly take place together. Next she will work closely with Latvian and Estonian naval vessels as part of a JEF Response Option – the coming together of ships and aircraft across the region to protect critical undersea infrastructure.

This will be the first time the response option has been activated following its creation this year to deter, and defend the region from threats and establish how JEF nations can quickly respond to crises. It will ensure an extended security presence, picking up from NATO’s enhanced Vigilance Activity which took place in the Baltic Sea region throughout November. The agreement comes following an extraordinary meeting of JEF defence ministers to discuss options for joint activity to defend offshore critical infrastructure, after an increase in attacks and threats.”

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Lisa has a degree in Media & Communication from Glasgow Caledonian University and works with industry news, sifting through press releases in addition to moderating website comments.
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David Lloyd
David Lloyd
1 month ago

No mention of RFA Proteus, our new MROSS which apparently entered service in October. Perhaps Proteus is still working up

Oliver Gilkes
Oliver Gilkes
1 month ago

What? On its own? Still massively overstretched on commitments.

Toby J
Toby J
1 month ago
Reply to  Oliver Gilkes

Read the article, it’s about to be joined by 6 other UK warships

FormerUSAF
FormerUSAF
1 month ago
Reply to  Toby J

Apparently, an entirely rational response to perceived threat. Rather surprised that it was not suggested and implemented sooner. 🤔

DP
DP
1 month ago
Reply to  FormerUSAF

Agreed.

Quentin D63
Quentin D63
1 month ago
Reply to  FormerUSAF

Totally, not that difficult to forsee this kind of threat to western/free world undersea infrastructure.

Ben Coe
Ben Coe
1 month ago
Reply to  Toby J

Including the minesweepers they are flogging off as fast as they can.

Steven Alfred Rake
Steven Alfred Rake
1 month ago

I thourght HMS Tyne and HMS Severn were on fishing protection duties and spotting the odd boat full of migrants coming across the Channel. Maybe they will be employed by Finland to help spot the illegals trying to get around the closed border fence with Russia.
I think the fact the we simply have not got any ships left to deploy is starting to hit home, well our political elite have thick skins so he will not be too bothered.

David
David
1 month ago

Wonder if HMS Somerset will show up with NSM fitted?

Quentin D63
Quentin D63
1 month ago
Reply to  David

Or pick up a couple of quad packs on the way through… Lol 😁

Quentin D63
Quentin D63
1 month ago

Bit of a silly question, but does Iceland have a navy as such?

Ben Coe
Ben Coe
1 month ago
Reply to  Quentin D63

Coastguard

Paul T
Paul T
1 month ago
Reply to  Quentin D63

Why have Warships when you can have Trawlers 🤔

Bringer of Facts
Bringer of Facts
1 month ago

She would be a more potent deterrent if the NSMs were fitted. I dont know why this upgrade is not being treated as an urgent priority.

Cygnet261
Cygnet261
1 month ago

What kind of weapon is the NSM?

Paul T
Paul T
1 month ago
Reply to  Cygnet261

Naval Strike Missile 👍

Mandy Sylvan
Mandy Sylvan
1 month ago

Pity there was nobody there to “deter” the blowing up of the Nordstream pipelines with massive environmental damage and the downfall of the European economy. And strange that there hasn’t been a proper investigation into who did it, and I am sure coincidental that the USA vetoed an investigation 🤔

Paul T
Paul T
1 month ago
Reply to  Mandy Sylvan

There has been some investigation into what happened .

Mandy Sylvan
Mandy Sylvan
30 days ago
Reply to  Paul T

“some” not “proper”. No official investigation through regular United Nations process. 15 months later what is the conclusion of investigations? It wasn’t an easy job and it’s hard to believe that there isn’t clear evidence of who did it. Soon after Sweden said that they knew who did it but didn’t want to say. The fact that it has been swept under the rug and if it was an enemy of the West who did it we would know about it is very suspicious to me.

Gavin Gordon
Gavin Gordon
29 days ago
Reply to  Mandy Sylvan

cont from above: However, with regard to the recent damage to Estonia-Finland undersea gas pipeline & communications cable, and the Sweden-Estonia communications cable. During Oct 23, investigation linked both events to a 1.5 to 4 metre-wide dragging trail caused by a anchor, later recovered. By the end of Oct, the vessel in the spotlight was the:- Newnew Polar Bear, a Chinese cargo vessel, by then in Archangel, Russian Arctic. Whilst in the Baltic, the NBI investigators had not been able to confirm the vessel retained both it’s anchors, but social media images whilst in Archangel appeared to show one missing.… Read more »

Gavin Gordon
Gavin Gordon
29 days ago
Reply to  Mandy Sylvan

Indeed a pity nobody there in 2022. But that’s why there’s been such a commitment to deterrence since. Continued after you’re next post…..