Elbit Systems UK announced that its Joint Fires Synthetic Trainer (JFST) has reached its Initial Operating Capability (IOC).

The simulation technology provides “real-time training for British Army, Royal Navy and Royal Air Force personnel who integrate Joint Fires, including both surface-to-surface and air-to-surface fires.”

The JFST has been operational at the Royal School of Artillery, Larkhill, and the Air Ground Operations School at RAF Leeming since 2022. To date, it has delivered “over 4700 hours of training” and has equipped over 300 service personnel from the British and Allied forces. Among those trained are individuals preparing for immediate front-line deployments.

Five operational systems are currently stationed at Larkhill, including a special armoured version of the trainer. Meanwhile, RAF Leeming’s Air Ground Operations School boasts three systems, two of which are “simulator domes providing 270-degree vision,” ensuring a comprehensive and immersive training experience.

Richard Smart, the Joint Effects Senior Responsible Owner (SRO) for JFST, expressed his satisfaction with the project, saying, “We are delighted to have worked in close collaboration with DE&S and ESUK to develop and deploy such a highly capable synthetic environment which is a game changer for Joint Fires training.

Martin Fausset, CEO of Elbit Systems UK, also commented on the achievement, stating, “This is an important milestone in the delivery of such a complex project. Elbit Systems UK is delighted to have delivered IOC. We look forward to the opportunities and benefits JFST will continue to bring to the UK MOD and our Allies.

Tom has spent the last 13 years working in the defence industry, specifically military and commercial shipbuilding. His work has taken him around Europe and the Far East, he is currently based in Scotland.
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farouk
farouk (@guest_755117)
8 months ago

Basically its a Gucci version of the Small Arms trainer (SAT ) aka Dismounted Close Combat Trainer (DCCT) which in laymans terms is a computer projected battlefield on a huge screen in front of you (minus CO2 powered SA80s) video here

farouk
farouk (@guest_755118)
8 months ago

Basically its a Gucci version of the Small Arms trainer (SAT ) aka Dismounted Close Combat Trainer (DCCT) which in laymans terms is a computer projected battlefield on a huge screen in front of you (minus CO2 powered SA80s)

AlexS
AlexS (@guest_755168)
8 months ago
Reply to  farouk

If it includes artillery fires and air to ground it is a a bit more than Gucci. But should be updated for drones and surface to air and anti drone.

dave12
dave12 (@guest_755245)
8 months ago

The tories have demolished our armed forces in 13 years , shame on them

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker (@guest_755252)
8 months ago
Reply to  dave12

Less simulators needed now for training. It’s all part of the cunning plan balldrick

klonkie
klonkie (@guest_755813)
8 months ago
Reply to  dave12

Yes they did – completing the work started by labour from 1999 to 2009. Both have dismal track records.

dave12
dave12 (@guest_755821)
8 months ago
Reply to  klonkie

Agreed , there seems to be no way out but military decline .

Airborne
Airborne (@guest_755257)
8 months ago

Never had the opportunity to use it, far too modern, had to do old school way, sat in the mud waiting for a platform never to arrive!!! Joint fires came in, in a big way around end of 2006, when we realised that we we’re actually going seriously kinetic in Afghan and our fires teams (aka FOO party, MFCs, FAC teams etc) we’re doing the same shit but differently lol! The end result is the same, many methods were also the same but the delivery option was different! Boom 2007 onwards we get the FST (fire support teams) (dates may… Read more »

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli (@guest_755326)
8 months ago
Reply to  Airborne

You missed an acronym out… TACP! Assume the same thing. I remember when they were all numbered, 600 range I think.

A disgruntled gunner
A disgruntled gunner (@guest_755314)
8 months ago

Having been one of the first cohorts to use JFST I can reliably say that it is yet another failed project by the MOD. The system was totally unusable with it crashing when a ounce of complexity was added. The system itself is hugely overly complex taking up significant space whilst also now being comparitvly behind most technology in terms of graphics and capability.

Tesla Power
Tesla Power (@guest_755476)
8 months ago

I couldn’t agree with you more. The simulators might be good enough for surface to surface fires, but the fidelity and processing power is nowhere near the level required for Close Air Support training. The system has zero redundancy for improvement, is already running at maximum capacity hence the consistent system failures and is not user friendly in way shape or form. I’ve not even started on the JTAC equipment that’s been modelled for the dome simulators which is not consistent with the fielded solution, it totally denudes the training realism. But hey, I guess it’s a success, it says… Read more »

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker (@guest_755491)
8 months ago

Perhaps it’s improved after teething troubles? If it can deliver something that is hard/expensive to replicate then it must have some value. If not then what’s the point really.
I used to be good at operation game but that doesn’t make me a surgeon😂😂😂

Chris
Chris (@guest_755485)
8 months ago

How can 270 degrees be “comprehensive”?

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker (@guest_755489)
8 months ago
Reply to  Chris

Normally ur not too worried about ur guys behind you? Somewhere for projectors etc to be entrance/exits?
I don’t know much about it so don’t know if it’s worth while.