Fighters and Surface-Based Air and Missile Defence units from Allies and Partners have come together in Poland and the Baltic States to take part in Ramstein Legacy 22, June 6-10.

According to a press release from the Alliance, Exercise Ramstein Legacy is Allied Air Command’s principal Integrated Air and Missile Defence (IAMD) exercise taking place across Poland, Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia.

“The exercise includes 17 Allied and Partner nations and will integrate Allied SBAMD units under NATO Command and Control. The NATO IAMD system is a collaborative effort and a key defensive component of the Alliance’s joint air power, which aims to ensure the stability and security of NATO’s airspace by coordinating, controlling and exploiting the air domain.”

“Given the current security situation following the Russian invasion of Ukraine, large-scale training exercises like this are, now, more important to NATO than ever,” said General Jeff Harrigian, Commander Allied Air Command.

“We will leverage this opportunity to increase multi-domain interoperability and unit readiness. Ramstein Legacy enhances our ability to defend Alliance territory and is a clear expression of NATO’s commitment to regional security and stability,” he added.

NATO say here that following the Russian invasion of Ukraine, there has been an increased use of missiles, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and combat aircraft close to the borders of NATO nations.

“This increases the air and missile threat to NATO territory and populations, primarily due to miscalculation or loss of guidance or control. Exercises like Ramstein Legacy 22 provide Allied units the opportunity to practice NATO Tactics, Techniques and Procedures in a realistic multi-domain scenario.”

Ramstein Legacy 22 is a long-planned activity to exercise NATO Command and Control of Allied IAMD capabilities.

Story via Allied Air Command Public Affairs Office.

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expat
expat
2 days ago

Always amazed at what they’re able to get onto an F16

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker
1 day ago
Reply to  expat

Yes it is. How they turn and climb with all the stuff hanging off I don’t know. Presumably good enough. I do love a gripen. Great aircraft, good price, running costs etc. Personally I would take a gripen over an f16. Now who’s going to pay for 250 gripen for Ukraine.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
1 day ago
Reply to  Monkey spanker

Germany or France might suggest buying some new sixth-gen aircraft for them in 2050-ish! What a cluster fck that’s turning into 😂

Dassault predicts decade of delay for FCAS fighter
08 JUNE 2022

https://www.janes.com/defence-news/air-platforms/latest/dassault-predicts-decade-of-delay-for-fcas-fighter

Last edited 1 day ago by Nigel Collins
Phil C
Phil C
1 day ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

I don’t really follow the common anti French, German, (Scottish) etc stuff on here. They are NATO members and we stand against Russia and China as NATO. The UK relies on them to support us as they do us when there are capability gaps. And our own procurement and development isn’t anything to write home about. Ajax. Good to see that Sweden and Finland continue to train with NATO members as they always have. Once Turkey’s objections are dealt with it will be a seamless integration and for the first time in a long time, the addition of two nations… Read more »

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
1 day ago
Reply to  Phil C

“I don’t really follow the common anti-French, German, (Scottish) etc stuff on here”

Neither do I Phil C!

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
1 day ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Agreed. Anti Scottish? They’re our kith and kin FFS. That sort of crap talk only fuels separation.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
1 day ago

Exactly, we have enough problems as it is. I was simply pointing out the fiasco that the FCAS fighter programme appears to be turning into, nothing more!

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
1 day ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Agree. There is a history of this sort of delay with France, with its insistence to be leader on multiple projects and the fall out that ensues. We’re well out of it. And that’s not being anti France, they’re allies. It’s fact.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
23 hours ago

👍

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker
11 hours ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

I would wait for something official about the in service date slip. Dassault are maybe mouthing off as terms are not going there way. If we don’t lead and have a massive work share and full design authority it won’t work out. Perhaps hoping France will pull out and go solo giving dassault the full contract for a french plane. Or more rafales are needed to reach out of service date. Every consequence of a delay seems to be a plus point for them

dan
dan
1 day ago

Turkey should be kicked out of NATO once and for all. They have done nothing since joining NATO besides crying about Greece becoming a NATO member and now stopping Sweden and Finland’s entry. Sweden and Finland are much more important to the security of Europe than Turkey is.

eclipse
eclipse
1 day ago
Reply to  dan

The only reason it hasn’t happened is because of the unstable security position in the Middle East and Turkey’s very important geographical location. It’s at the crossroads of Asia, Europe; and is in proximity to the critical Suez Canal. In addition, it controls entrance to the Black Sea. I don’t believe Turkey is necessarily an enemy to NATO, simply that they have too often put their own interests, ones that harm NATO overall, above all else. I think now is not the time to expel Turkey, but that after the situation in the Black Sea cools down NATO should try… Read more »

Klonkie
Klonkie
1 day ago
Reply to  eclipse

Agreed Dan, far better to have them in the club than out. Important to note leadership and governments will change as will their political tone and posture. The Tukey of tomorrow maybe a different place t that of today, so a constant NATO theme is a binding thread.

Expat
Expat
15 hours ago
Reply to  Klonkie

Let’s see I think Erdoğan will struggle to give up power. A lot of opposition were arrested and clamped down on during the (staged?) coup.

Klonkie
Klonkie
13 hours ago
Reply to  Expat

The world’s a funny place though Expat. We never know who or what is around the corner. Politically, Erdogan appears to be losing traction, but then who knows how he might react if he lost an election fair and square.

Personally, I’d de surprised if Turkish military and political leadership take the view their lot is better off cosing up to Russia rather than Western Europe.

Gareth
Gareth
23 hours ago
Reply to  eclipse

Another reason is because one can bet that Putin would lose no time in cosying up to Turkey if they left NATO. Everyone is basically reliant on Turkey for access to the Black Sea. Turkey of course is well aware of this and so can use a potential re-alignment towards Russia as a bargaining chip when negotiating with the West about NATO expansion and other issues.

Last edited 23 hours ago by Gareth
Matt
Matt
53 seconds ago
Reply to  eclipse

I don’t think that anyone will get a settlement with Turkey more strategically favourable to Europe than the current one, which was rooted in what was left after WW1 demolished the Ottoman Empire.

Just imagine Turkey turning into revolutionary Iran Mk 2!

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker
1 day ago
Reply to  dan

There must be a reason turkey joined in the first place. Don’t know what it was. There leadership will change at somepoint and might be better. Might be worse. I don’t know enough to actually know if there is any friction with nato or if it’s just looks that way sometimes. Turkey is the most different to the nato standard. Mostly white, European or descendents of that group. Nothing wrong with that just might be part of why some see them as the current black sheep of the nato family

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
1 day ago
Reply to  Monkey spanker

Threat from the Soviet Unions SMD?

Simon
Simon
15 hours ago

Threats from Stalin in the late 40’s/early 50’s

Ulya
Ulya
1 day ago
Reply to  dan

Is there a process to kick a country out of NATO? would all countries need to vote?

Phil C
Phil C
1 day ago
Reply to  Ulya

I don’t think so. I guess it would allow the others to chuck out someone if they suspected they were under threat and could avoid article 5.

And as much as it’s tempting to chuck Turkey out for reasons like Finland/Sweden, Greece, arranging supply of stolen grain by Russia, meeting with Putin/Lavrov (why don’t they get called for that like Macron does?) S400/F-35 etc, the old saying of keeping your enemies closer perhaps comes into play. They do seem to be very matey with Putin, more so even than Hungry.

ChariotRider
ChariotRider
1 day ago
Reply to  Phil C

Don’t forget that the Turks shot down a Russian fighter that crossed into Turkish airspace a few years ago and if I remember rightly Russia and Turkey are “competing” in Libya. The Turkey / Russia relationship is not that straight forward. Turkey is after all just looking after its’ own interests, hardly surprising given the way the EU kept them out of the club. If I remember rightly, last time they were rebuffed there was talk from some more ‘fringe’ quarters that the EU was and should remain a “Christian” Club or some such. Not the best way to maintain… Read more »

Mark
Mark
23 hours ago
Reply to  ChariotRider

The major supporter of Turkish membership of the EU is gone now, and Turkey has never been close to meeting all the criteria for membership. It wasn’t going to happen and isn’t going to happen. And Turkey under its current government has done little to build relationships with EU states either so it goes both ways.

ChariotRider
ChariotRider
1 hour ago
Reply to  Mark

Agreed, that was basically the point I was making with my last paragraph – obviously, it could have been longer…

The point is Turkey has always gone its own way a good example being its’ one time close relationship with Isreal.

I think if push came to shove then they would side with NATO, but I understand some have their concerns and unease with that. I share them. We live in a changing and uncertain world and it is only going to get worse, especially as climate change get worse and food production is gradually reduced…

CR

grizzler
grizzler
13 hours ago
Reply to  ChariotRider

Dont forget about Cyprus

ChariotRider
ChariotRider
1 hour ago
Reply to  grizzler

I could have written a book… point is Turkey follows its own path.

Cheers CR

ABCRodney
ABCRodney
23 hours ago

Turkey controls the Bosporus and Dardanelles as such they control the sea access to South East Europe, so we do not want to upset them.
Their statements about blocking membership is their Ante to start off negotiations on what they want, F16’s and the end of the sanctions imposed when they bought the S400 from Russia.
What I struggle with is why Greece and Cyprus didn’t get the same sanctions for also buying Russian SAM systems ?

Mark
Mark
22 hours ago
Reply to  ABCRodney

I thought the main issue was buying the Russian SAMs and having Russian techs involved while also intending to buy F35s and the concerns that the Russians could gain information that way?

Cyprus doesn’t have any fighters and Greece isn’t buying F35s currently.

ChariotRider
ChariotRider
1 hour ago
Reply to  Mark

Might get interesting if they try to buy F35’s…

Cheers CR

Mark
Mark
27 minutes ago
Reply to  ChariotRider

They might post 2028, but by then who knows if their S300s are still in service, or what if any Russian engagement with them might be.