HMS Queen Elizabeth, pictured here with Carrier Strike Group member HMS Artful, has resumed her deployment after a port visit in Italy.

HMS Artful is an Astute class nuclear submarine and recently visited Gibraltar. She is the third of the seven Astute-class submarines to be built for the Royal Navy. She began her naval career in 2015, and was commissioned in 2016.

The Astute class are the largest, most advanced and most powerful attack submarines ever operated by the Royal Navy, combining world leading sensors, design and weaponry in a versatile vessel. The class have provision for up-to 38 weapons in six 21-inch torpedo tubes. The submarines are capable of using Tomahawk Block IV land-attack missiles with a range of 1,000 miles and Spearfish heavyweight torpedoes.

What is the UK Carrier Strike Group doing?

HMS Queen Elizabeth is the deployed flag ship for Carrier Strike Group 21 (CSG21), a deployment that will see the ship and her escorts sail to the Asia-Pacific and back.

The Carrier Strike Group.

CSG21 will see the ship along with the Strike Group work with over 40 countries from around the world. The Strike Group will operate and exercise with other countries Navies and Air Forces during the 7 month deployment.

The Carrier Strike Group at sea

The Carrier Strike Group includes ships from the United States Navy, the Dutch Navy, and Marines from the US Marine Corps. As well as British frigates, destroyers, a submarine, two RFA supply ships and air assets from 617 Sqn, 820 NAS, 815 NAS and 845 NAS.

This is the largest deployment of Fifth Generation Fighter Jets at sea in history.

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Andrew D
Andrew D
1 month ago

Starting to look very serious 👹

Herodotus
Herodotus
1 month ago

Do hunter-killers transit the Suez canal. I can’t imagine that they do!

John Clark
John Clark
1 month ago
Reply to  Herodotus

It’s the long way round for SSN’s H, you wouldn’t want an Astute jackknifed in the Suez canal…..

Julian1
Julian1
1 month ago
Reply to  John Clark

Would that suggest that another astute is already en route or will Artful about turn and transit around to meet the other side whilst CSG lingers in the med?

geoff
geoff
1 month ago
Reply to  John Clark

Pity she didn’t call into Durban en route 🙂

BB85
BB85
1 month ago
Reply to  Herodotus

They do. I’m more curious if Israel has ever sent a sub through suez or do they need to take the long way around. Its very far for a diesel sub to go without a refill.

David Steeper
David Steeper
1 month ago
Reply to  BB85

Eilat Israeli port gulf of Aqaba Red sea.

Michael Fowler
Michael Fowler
1 month ago
Reply to  David Steeper

Israeli subs transit the suez often

BB85
BB85
1 month ago
Reply to  David Steeper

Ahh, I didn’t realise Israel had a coastline on the red sea for some reason I though Egypt connected to Jordan. That’s handy for them.

Julian1
Julian1
1 month ago
Reply to  David Steeper

I went to eilat Yeats ago, it’s a resort I don’t remember any naval facilities though there must be something I guess given it’s strategic position. It’s a sliver of land a few miles wide on the Red Sea. I was diving at the time and remember doing a 40m dive on air to visit a sunken patrol boat. I was barely qualified at the time and the crazy Israeli instructor took me deeper than I was qualified.

David Steeper
David Steeper
1 month ago
Reply to  Julian1

Your probably right see Michael Fowler comment. But Israel are very serious about military secrecy for good reason. Would be surprised if some kind of support facility wasn’t there.

Michael Fowler
Michael Fowler
1 month ago
Reply to  David Steeper

Used to live there..there small boat shed with a patrol ship and a 1000 or so personal

Gunbuster
Gunbuster
1 month ago
Reply to  Julian1

Asong as you do the stop before surfacing you will be fine. (PADI Qualified Advanced and Rescue Diver! ) that’s why the stop is there… To allow for “accidently” exceeding the 32m limit.

Deep32
Deep32
1 month ago
Reply to  Herodotus

They can and often do, I’d be surprised if she didn’t, would probably add 3-4 weeks to go round the Cape and rejoin the CSG somewhere in the Arabian gulf.
Not only would it add in necessary journey time, but also burn more ‘core hours’ then is necessary.

Deep32
Deep32
1 month ago
Reply to  Deep32

Try un- necessary.

Sonik
Sonik
1 month ago
Reply to  Deep32

I thought we were told nuclear boats weren’t allowed through Suez? Was used as one of the justifications for QE going IEP.

Deep32
Deep32
1 month ago
Reply to  Sonik

They transit the Suez as and when required, our ‘shooters’ always did, saves time and core life, all you have to do is pay for it.
Not aware of using it as a excuse for QE going IEP!

Sonik
Sonik
1 month ago
Reply to  Deep32

Ah thanks, must have imagined that. Maybe it’s the Egyptian ports that don’t allow nuclear vessels.

I guess the only possible downside of using the canal is that the surface transit lets others know which side of the world the boat is. But I guess that works both ways too.

BB85
BB85
1 month ago
Reply to  Sonik

Your thinking of the bosphorus strait in Turkey. I don’t think nuc’s or aircraft carriers are allowed.

Gunbuster
Gunbuster
1 month ago
Reply to  Herodotus

Yes they do. Subs go through on the surface. Usually with a group of warships adding their firepower as Force Protection escorts.

dc647a
dc647a
1 month ago
Reply to  Herodotus

Hunter killers do use the Suez canal especially the US,if the UK won’t send them through the canal there will be one waiting for them on the other side. I reckon it would be an impressive sight all of them going through the Suez.

Sonik
Sonik
1 month ago

Great to see the CSG joining up and working with so many navies. All helps with building partnerships and strengthening alliances around the world.

Rob
Rob
1 month ago

Just in time to do a bit ASW training before Suez. Is the CSG only accompanied by HMS Artful? I doubt it. I reckon there maybe a USN SSN waiting in the Gulf.

Jacko
Jacko
1 month ago

Is this a deliberate ploy by HMG? I thought our sub ops were kept secret.

Sonik
Sonik
1 month ago
Reply to  Jacko

From the nation that invented the double cross system…we can draw our own conclusions but so will everyone else.

Last edited 1 month ago by Sonik
dan
dan
1 month ago
Reply to  Jacko

Just something to tell potential adversaries that there’s always an SSN close by in case they get any ideas. lol

John Clark
John Clark
1 month ago
Reply to  dan

Absolutely Dan, an ‘extremely’ capable SSN at that, one that’s perfectly capable gutting most Navies by itself.

Jacko
Jacko
1 month ago
Reply to  John Clark

Well seems like lots of people think only our ships can sink 😀 

Warren
Warren
1 month ago
Reply to  dan

Would not be surprised if there isn’t another astute already tasked to go east of suez ahead of the csg and Artful is just a distraction whilst in the med.

Sonik
Sonik
1 month ago
Reply to  Warren

I think more likely Artful’s visible presence is just a display of capability. It is a flag waving exercise after all. And presumably has to transit Suez surfaced anyway so it’s hardly a secret.

Challenger
Challenger
1 month ago

How many SSN’s do we reckon the Royal Navy have at sea on a good day? 2, maybe 3?

Would 1 of those be kept close to the UK to support CASD and monitor The Russian boats movements?

That would presumably leave only 1 or at best 2 boats deployed further afield.

Deep32
Deep32
1 month ago
Reply to  Challenger

We currently have 6 boats available, 4 Astutes and 2 T boats. Artful is going with the CSG, one has just been out Autec for Spearfish trials, one of the T boats (Talent) has just finished a long spell at sea. One will be in a maintenance period, one probably getting ready to deploy, which leaves one SM, to cover all the rest of the tasking they get. The T boats are too old for this type of deployment, so the choice was always going to be a A boat to accompany the CSG. We won’t be sending a second… Read more »

Challenger
Challenger
1 month ago
Reply to  Deep32

Imagine 4 available for operations is a bit optimistic! There must be at least one deployed in the North Atlantic given the importance of the deterrent and the increase in Russian activity which leaves pretty slim pickings for anything else.

Artful will either accompany the CSG for the entire deployment or a USN boat will take it’s place East of Suez as i can’t see us risking it without one present.

Having 7 younger Astute’s eventually in service will no doubt help availability but it’s still a real point of weakness.

Deep32
Deep32
1 month ago
Reply to  Challenger

They certainly have a lot of tasking to cover, we don’t generally deploy a SM into the North Atlantic unless there is a need to…… then we often rotate that task with the US. I would suggest that Artful will accompany the CSG for the entire deployment, joining up with the US EoS and into the SCS. It will provide good trg opportunities for the crew in different ocean environments against different Navies. When we get to 7 A class, we will still have too many tasks for what we have available to us. It’s a situation that is not… Read more »

Sonik
Sonik
1 month ago
Reply to  Deep32

It’s far from ideal, but If you think about a worst case scenario (i.e. something kicks off that UK has to face without allies) 6-7 SSN is probably the absolute minimum, we can get away with. USA is aligned with UK priorities in terms of routine SSN tasking, so just like with the escort fleet, there’s options for someone else to backfill, if we ever need the entire fleet to deal with a crisis. If boats are serviceable (which doesn’t mean perfect; just safe to operate) and crew can be found, they can/will be pushed into service. So 3-4 should… Read more »

Deep32
Deep32
1 month ago
Reply to  Sonik

@X has posted some interesting comments about this over on NL, must say that I agree with him. The West (US/UK/France) are going to face a SSN shortfall over the next decade or two as the Russians and PRC ramp up output. US is replacing her LA class with Virginia class on a 1-1 basis so will end up with about 70 SSNs, we will have 7 and the French 6 Barracudas-eventually. The Russian SSNs are quiet nearly on a par with us, fortunately they don’t have many. The PRC are building like builder bees, fortunately they are a generation… Read more »

Sonik
Sonik
1 month ago
Reply to  Deep32

Good points, do need to consider the wider strategic context.

China is the one to watch I think, they clearly have global ambitions, and they have the resources to deliver it. And as the Russians demonstrate, SSNs allow global reach without so much of the logistical complexity of surface fleet.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
1 month ago
Reply to  Deep32

Shameful. SSN would be my No1 priority.

Deep32
Deep32
1 month ago

Absolutely mate, absolutely.

Andy a
Andy a
1 month ago
Reply to  Deep32

We could make up nos like we’re planning on f35 with uav. I read an idea cousins are planning is ssn with couple of drones so they can daisy chain under water, extend sensor range and perhaps arm them one day. An astute with a drone would be hard core. Orca is it? Manta? One of two

Last edited 1 month ago by Andy a
Deep32
Deep32
1 month ago
Reply to  Andy a

Unfortunately I remain highly skeptical over the use of UAVs and what they are ever likely to be able to achieve in this environment. If it were easily achievable we would be doing it now, but we are not, we are light years behind what we are doing in the air domain with drones etc. The underwater environment is a tough place to operate drones for lots of reasons, it is easier to talk to a man on the moon then it is to communicate adequately between 2 SMs underwater at 10 miles!!!!! It’s baby steps WRT progress in this… Read more »

Sonik
Sonik
1 month ago
Reply to  Deep32

I agree, there are fundamental physical limitations that make underwater communication very difficult and impractical. There is an article just up on NL on this very subject. I’m sure that the tech will improve but it’s never going to get to the same place as surface/arial systems. Water just isn’t a very good transmission medium. It’s obviously possible to send an autonomous platform on a scouting trip, with a pre-programmed mission. But data feedback and remote control is very restricted by the inherent communication limitations, which increase exponentially with distance. Onboard AI could help here but it’s still a very… Read more »

Last edited 1 month ago by Sonik
Jonathan
Jonathan
1 month ago
Reply to  Deep32

The interesting area here will be quantum communication. There are a number of research papers around the transmission of photon polarised states through sea water up to 55meters a few years ago quantum communication experiments used free space air quantum communication channels through up to 32cms of air now we have quantum communication satellites that transmit photon polarised states through 1200km of atmosphere. What this means is that you can have air to water to air quantum communication across the globe. We really are at significant point in using the total madness of quantum physics to create and harness new… Read more »

Deep32
Deep32
1 month ago
Reply to  Jonathan

Jonathan, vmt for the post, have read it several times and still haven’t a clue what it is!!!
So, will enjoy a bottle of red with the football tonight, and, then give it a good looking at/investigating tomorrow. Whilst I am very familiar with the way Comms/sound works in the sea, this is a little left field to me at the moment.
Like I said, Cheers for the post, will be something to look at in next few days.

Jonathan
Jonathan
1 month ago
Reply to  Deep32

Hi Deep This is one of the best papers, it’s not from a western peer reviewed publication, but the Chinese publishers are generally reliable: https://www.osapublishing.org/prj/fulltext.cfm?uri=prj-7-8-A40&id=416194 This is one really interesting conclusion but basically we are a step away from satellite to sub, fast as light ( through air and water) totally Secure ( quantum key distribution). The ability of quantum computer to penetrate encryption means that present encryption will be effectively redundant so quantum communication using quantum key distribution Via fibre cable, free space air and water transmission of the photons. https://www.csoonline.com/article/3235970/what-is-quantum-cryptography-it-s-no-silver-bullet-but-could-improve-security.html But the very odd Noodle cooking behaviour of… Read more »

Andy a
Andy a
1 month ago
Reply to  Deep32

I believe the US system is a tiny float wit a fibre cable that lets it stop just below surface then communicates to either the satellites or the special planes and drones used for boomer communications. Or other floated idea was small recoverable drone. Future tech could be optical laser? Very secure

Deep32
Deep32
1 month ago
Reply to  Andy a

Cheers Andy.

The Artist Formerly Known As Los Pollos Chicken
The Artist Formerly Known As Los Pollos Chicken
1 month ago
Reply to  Deep32

Could you point me in the direction of the info that states the Trafalgar class are too old to sail underwater shadowing surface vessels on a deployment ?

this seems odd and I find it hard to believe I’d be grateful for some clarity man.
in the spirit of click -smile -non racist – click-asking 👍🏻

🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿🇬🇧

Deep32
Deep32
1 month ago

Evening, a good question, what you seek isn’t readily available for you to peruse at leisure, but, neither is it just hearsay or speculation. The decision not to send a T boat is based on several factors, predominantly reliability issues and risk mitigation. Both T boats are over 30 years old having had their OSD extended at vast expense. Unlike a good Rouge Vin nuclear systems do not age well with time. In fact they become more unreliable and prone to failure requiring lots of work to put defects right, none of which is cheap. The other issues are ‘core’… Read more »

Sonik
Sonik
1 month ago
Reply to  Deep32

Besides the RC life, others have said on NL that cycle life of the hull is the main lifecycle issue. Because a submarine is essentially a pressure vessel, each dive adds stresses that ultimately have fatigue limits, just like a pressurised aircraft.

It’s not like corrosion fatigue on a surface vessel (which can be restored by replacing sections of plate) because pressure cycle stress fatigue affects the whole hull, so eventually it becomes uneconomic to repair Vs replacement with a new boat.

I’m no expert but that’s what I’ve been told anyway.

Deep32
Deep32
1 month ago
Reply to  Sonik

It can become an issue, but there are ways to mitigate/extend the cycle life of the hull. Hills have a known deep diving depth, which they go to on test dives and don’t generally exceed. Then there is an additional safety factor built in which allows the boat to safely go deeper if required. It’s a generous amount too. However, most SMs operate in relatively shallow depths for most of their lives (normally 200m or less), as their is often little to be gained tactically by spending more time deeper. Yes they can and do operate at greater depths, but… Read more »

Deep32
Deep32
1 month ago
Reply to  Deep32

Hills!!!! Try hulls!

Sonik
Sonik
1 month ago
Reply to  Deep32

Thanks, that’s interesting info.

I presume then some of the older boats may have operational limits that may restrict their usefulness? Or does it not really matter? I would expect that the original design depths are selected for good reason, as additional depth capability must increase the build cost quite a lot.

Your username is a bit of a giveaway BTW!

Deep32
Deep32
1 month ago
Reply to  Sonik

Not restrict their usefulness really, just limit their operating depths. I’ve only known it happen the once, and that was to one of our SSK s back in the day. It didn’t stop her going to sea, just limited how deep she could go.
The main advantage of a deep diving depth is it allows you to get below the crush depth of a torpedo if things get tasty(always good for morale!!).
Like Ive said SMs don’t really spend that much time really deep, there is no need unless you are in a fight!

Sonik
Sonik
1 month ago
Reply to  Deep32

Ah ok, thanks. So it’s more of a tactical restriction.

I guess then a boat with limited dive depth is still perfectly useful for patrol duty, but would have to think carefully about how/where to use it if ‘things got tasty’ like you said.

Another thought, given the average age of the dilapidated Russian fleet, that perhaps puts a different perspective on the severity of the threat, in reality. Amazing the things you learn on here, thanks again!

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
1 month ago
Reply to  Deep32

Love reading your insights on this Deep.

Respect.

The Artist Formerly Known As Los Pollos Chicken
The Artist Formerly Known As Los Pollos Chicken
1 month ago
Reply to  Deep32

Oh 4 sure 4 sure man yes what you say seems very plausible and not sky Comcast news spin driven.

so aye it does clarify a wee bit.👍🏻

🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿🇬🇧

Mr Bell
Mr Bell
1 month ago

Would love to see QE battle group visit the Falklands. Just for the incandescent rage the Argies would get themselves into.
Yes that is a 70000 ton aircraft carrier, with 5th generation stealth fighters and accompanied by 2 of the best frigates in the world and the worlds best air defence destroyers. Possibly with the worlds best hunter killer SSN in support.
What have you got Argentina?
Nowt is the answer.

David Steeper
David Steeper
1 month ago
Reply to  Mr Bell

Don’t need to. Argentine Navy or Airforce are zero threat. No need to poke the bear. Hopefully someone on hear said they’re getting over the ‘Malvinas’ nonsense. That would be the best result.

Rogbob
Rogbob
1 month ago
Reply to  Mr Bell

Or we could save the money and not bother.

Since the 4 Typhoons there already outclass the entire Argentinian Armed Force on their own 🙂

Rudeboy1
Rudeboy1
1 month ago
Reply to  Rogbob

Just the 3…nicknamed ‘Faith’, ‘Hope’ and ‘Charity’ after the 3 Sea Gladiators that defended Malta at the start of the Italian Blitz in WW2 (there were actually more than 3 however…).

Rogbob
Rogbob
1 month ago
Reply to  Rudeboy1

Dont know what they call the 4th, but it’s there!

Tim
Tim
1 month ago
Reply to  Rogbob

The 4 Gladiators on Malta were called: Faith, Hope, Charity and Desperation”. The book is a fascinating read, as is anything on Operation Pedestal. I’m not sure though if the 4th Typhoon at Mt Pleasant is called Desperation!

Rogbob
Rogbob
1 month ago
Reply to  Tim

Yeah jad some books on Malta and a really fascinating place to visit. Plus warm 🙂

Iirc the 4th was called “really badly broken”. But still more useful than the Argentine air force!

Sonik
Sonik
1 month ago
Reply to  Mr Bell

No need, the whole point of having the CSG is to act as a deterrent. Argentina was opportunistic in 82, they did not believe that UK would be able to retaliate due to UK defence cuts, in the South Atlantic and elsewhere. Even if it were possible for them to do it again (which it isn’t) the simple fact that UK now has a credible CSG would give them pause.

Last edited 1 month ago by Sonik
Rogbob
Rogbob
1 month ago

Somewhat unrelated question, but is it possible to get a definitive answer as to how the T45 could be upgraded? – I’m certain there is a void space between the front of the VLS and the gun, said to be good for 16 VLS. (Eg for land attack or ABM missiles). That has been discussed to death I know! – The gun was supposed to be swappable for a larger one, upto 155mm. Also common knowledge. But my question is, are those mutually compatible or are they exclusive? Looking at it from above, the gun appears to have 360deg train,… Read more »

John Clark
John Clark
1 month ago
Reply to  Rogbob

I doubt there will be any serious additions or changes to the T45, main gun will probably see it out of service, plenty of spares for the system after T23 is withdrawn.

Any additional VL systems are also extremely unlikely as T26 and upgrades to T31 plus the forthcoming T32 equipment plan will suck that budget dry.

Potential upgrades, ‘might’ be quad packing Sea Ceptor to replace Astor 15, Astor NG to replace the ’30’, Anti Ballistic missile Sampson radar upgrade and Lazer point defence systems….

Rogbob
Rogbob
1 month ago
Reply to  John Clark

To clarify, I’m not actually expecting any of this to happen, not least as I think T45’s upgrade boat has already sailed (sorry!) and the propulsion issues ate that time, money and project team effort, with future thought now on the Type 83s (assuming that is actually more than just a line in a Boris speech..).

What I’m interested in is the viability of options as discussed, its speculative rather than realistic in terms of outcome, but I’d like to know the realism aspects of how thise options could (have been) executed, if that makes sense.

Deep32
Deep32
1 month ago
Reply to  Rogbob

Morning mate, T45 are designed to accommodate an additional 16 (Mk41) cells between the main gun and Astor launch cells, but as we can see, they have never been fitted.

Rogbob
Rogbob
1 month ago
Reply to  Deep32

Can they do that and have a larger gun (say the 127mm US)? And what impact do the reduced gun arcs have goven you’ve now got a 64 cells VLS there? Noting the US has a 32 cell upfront and retains seperation to the gun (hence wondering what goes on below deck in terms of conflicting demand for space).

Gunbuster
Gunbuster
1 month ago
Reply to  Rogbob

VLS silos take up a huge amount of prime real estate right in the centre of a ship. On a USN AB the silos are flush with the deck so they go a lot deeper into the bowls of the vessel. You also need to factor in all the firefighting arrangements , electrical supplies etc to service the silo. RN T45 and T23 silos protrude above 1 deck and have a structure built around the protruding parts of the silo. This structure provides protection to the missiles above 1 deck edge level and means you dont take up as much… Read more »

Sonik
Sonik
1 month ago
Reply to  Gunbuster

Protruding VLS silos are a neat feature on RN vessels.

Did this happen by default, due to insufficient internal space when VLS replaced trainable SW launchers on T23? RN seem to see the benefits having carried the feature onto T45 & T26

Last edited 1 month ago by Sonik
Gunbuster
Gunbuster
1 month ago
Reply to  Sonik

It’s a British thing.
It does meen that the warhead is above 1 deck and not inside the ship should it go bang by accident.
It also means you have a structurally stronger vessel as there is not a hoofing big void space on the centerline of it…. Just a little bit of a hoofing big void space!
T23 was always down for VL Sea Wolf to be fitted so the GWS 25 6 barrel launchers where never a consideration.

Sonik
Sonik
1 month ago
Reply to  Gunbuster

Thanks. So the protruding VLS was a deliberate design feature from the start.

It looks like quite a simple thing to do, probably costs very little extra Vs flush deck mount because it’s mostly just steelwork. There are many obvious benefits, keeps green water off the VLS lids too. Surprising others haven’t copied.

Deep32
Deep32
1 month ago
Reply to  Rogbob

GB beat me with a v in depth reply. I would only have suggested that you talk with him anyway, as it’s more his area then mine.
Regards, D32

OldSchool
OldSchool
1 month ago
Reply to  John Clark

Agree with the mentioned upgrades. But the ASW fit is appalling – compare the T45 with the Hobart class – thats what the T45 upgrades need to mirror.

Andy a
Andy a
1 month ago
Reply to  John Clark

Quad packed sea ceptor would give far more capabilities for price, is it a simple swap? Are the systems compatible and easy to swap?

Tim
Tim
1 month ago
Reply to  Rogbob

I think the only upgrade the T45’s will get is quad packed Sea Ceptor and some additional boosters to up the A15’s into A30’s.
I would like to see a pair of tripple Stingray deck launchers behind the hangar with Stingray upgraded to also be a hard kill anti-torpedo counter measure but I can’t see that happenning.

Rogbob
Rogbob
1 month ago
Reply to  Tim

I would say that is highly unlikely given new ships (T26) even with large VLS are still having dedicated Sea Ceptor cells so cleerly there is either no appetite, or an issue, in qaud packing.

Key question is, could T45 have the extra 16 VLS and say the 5” gun in the spaces available?

Not that it will, but I’m interested in the answer. Cheers

Gunbuster
Gunbuster
1 month ago
Reply to  Rogbob

Yes you could put a 5inch gun on. It would take a major redesign of the deck strengthening, magazine, magazine hoist, magazine stowage racks.
Then a new ballistic computer and command system mod.

You could easily use the existing EO directors that bits easy.
Would it be worth it in the time left in service for the vessels?
Probably not.

Same can be said for VLS. Not worth it in the time left.

Rogbob
Rogbob
1 month ago
Reply to  Gunbuster

Cheers – would having a new gun and VLS not result in a compromised arc of fire? Although is that really an issue since T23 has had it.

Agree not remotely worth it but I was wondering!

Gunbuster
Gunbuster
1 month ago
Reply to  Rogbob

Firing arcs for the Gun are not a big issue. If you are on the gun line doing NGS the gun is going to be at approx R or G 90 anyway as you transit parallel ish to the targets. You move the ship to open up firing arcs anyway when you need to.

Rogbob
Rogbob
1 month ago
Reply to  Gunbuster

Cheers, it didnt seem to be an issue on T23 and yet both extant T45 and an AB have a nice big 360 circle around the gun so wondered if that was a requirement or just a bonus of the space they had..

Rudeboy1
Rudeboy1
1 month ago
Reply to  Rogbob

The ‘packing’ (it might not be ‘quad packing’) is being sorted by the Italian’s for CAMM-ER as they’re looking to use Sylver for CAMM-ER on PPA and other vessels. Whether that work is useful to CAMM is another matter as I believe the Italians are only buying CAMM-ER.

Gunbuster
Gunbuster
1 month ago
Reply to  Tim

RN units have Surface Ship Torpedo Defence System fitted in high threat areas. Its A towed array for detecting torpedoes. It gives an unmissable audible warning to the Ops Room and gives you the best options for a course and speed to get the hell out of Dodge. The towed part also contains other systems to defeat and confuse a homing torpedo. As well as that there are decoy launchers on the upper deck that fire off in water decoys to confuse and distract torpedoes. It’s easier and safer to confuse a torpedo than hit it with another torpedo. What… Read more »

Gunbuster
Gunbuster
1 month ago
Reply to  Tim

Tubes on the flight deck… Not a great idea should you get a crash on deck. Now that the latest version of Sting Ray has an insensitive warhead it’s better and safer than the original version which, in a fuel fire, such as a crash on deck, could do a full order detonation in a few mins . It could also form the shaped charge penetrator and punch a hole through a substantial part of the ship. Now you (still) just need to worry about a battery fire if sea water gets the battery wet enough to power it up.… Read more »

geoff
geoff
1 month ago

Meanwhile and true to form, the Mail online reports on the CSG as having “the’ HMS Queen Elizabeth heading the list and tagging her as the 5 billion Dollar Carrier?! When and why would one quote her build cost in US dollars?
Defence correspondents (it’s your turn to do the Navy story Ethel) on the Daily Mail don’t take notes

DRS
DRS
1 month ago
Reply to  geoff

I think The Mail online now have US and also Oz readers and tend to produce stories for global consumption which it is why USD rather than GBP.

Frank62
Frank62
1 month ago

Has Tidespring had her CIWS Phalanx fitted yet? I see Tidesurge docked in Portsmouth doesn’t have them yet.