Six Typhoons from 12 Squadron flew over sixty missions from Doha Air Base in Qatar.

The exercise concluded on Thursday and saw 12 Squadron operate with integrated QEAF personnel as a joint squadron in Qatar for the first time, completing over 60 successful missions.

The Typhoon FGR4 was flown in both air-to-air and air-to-surface missions, integrating with Qatari Joint Terminal Attack Controllers on the ground simulating Close Air Support, as well as flying challenging dogfighting scenarios alongside and against Qatari Rafales and Mirage 2000-5s.

Qatar has ordered 24 Typhoons, 9 fast-jet Hawk trainers, and a package of support and training for its pilots and technicians worth £6 billion. This deal sustains thousands of jobs in the UK at BAE’s Warton facility in Lancashire, securing work on the production line into the next decade.

The first of Qatar’s Typhoons are on schedule to be ready for 2022, and the Qatari pilots who form an integral role on 12 Squadron, based at RAF Coningsby, are likely to be amongst the first to fly them as part of the country’s new Typhoon squadron.

Lt Col Faisal Al-Ghanim, Deputy Officer Commanding 12 Squadron, said:

“Returning to Qatar to fly the Typhoon for the first time as a joint squadron has been an exceptionally proud moment. We have achieved so much together over the last two weeks, sharing our thoughts and ideas on the ground to develop our tactics and skills in the air. I am very excited to return to the UK where we will soon be welcoming new Qatari Typhoon pilots and technicians onto 12 Squadron.”

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Ian M.
Ian M.
11 months ago

And back to the Mess for a beer?

geoff
geoff
11 months ago
Reply to  Ian M.

Hi Ian. Should have been a massive factory for building frigates! 🙂

farouk
farouk
11 months ago

Here’s something not mentioned. Qatar a Gulf state has fallen out with all the neighbours who accuse it of getting into bed with Iran. Currently all borders (Air/sea and land) are closed off Where once Qatar received its food stuffs through Saudi Arabia now it is shipped in from iran and Turkey. Knowing that it faced a threat from its Sunni Kin, Doha decided to purchase lots of weapons from the following: UK France US Russia China all of whom are UN Security council permanent members . The purchase is nothing to so with the quality of the weapons its… Read more »

BB85
BB85
11 months ago
Reply to  farouk

Yeah militarily I just can’t see Qatar lasting more than 10 minutes if it was invaded by Saudi Arabia, they need backing from UN security Council to guarantee their security.

Is Saudi still digging a trench around Qatar to effectively turn it into an Island? So long as they don’t start doing joint exercises with Iran and leaving jets over there for safekeeping. What could possibly go wrong there

James
James
11 months ago
Reply to  BB85

I think the ‘Salwa Canal’ has been shelved, selling the idea as a tourism project didnt seem to gain traction or maybes external forces stopped Saudi pursuing it. I very much doubt Qatar will cosy up to Iran, USA has its largest middle east air base in the country for a start which is also probably the biggest deterrent they need for Saudi to not invade. I think some dialogue has finally started between them and the rest of the GCC countries since the falling out a couple of years back. The 2022 world cup happening in the country I… Read more »

Fedaykin
Fedaykin
11 months ago
Reply to  BB85

I think you are rather over estimating the abilities of the Saudi Armed Forces, they might be luxuriously equipped but you would probably see more military talent and tactical acumen in the average Cub Scout troop…

James
James
11 months ago
Reply to  Fedaykin

Certainly agree, Yemen being a case in point, throwing all sorts at it and sadly just destroying a country and not actually defeating anything they are attacking.

Fedaykin
Fedaykin
11 months ago
Reply to  James

Well the people of Yemen did have the temerity to … looks at notes … introduce representative democracy

Captain P Wash
Captain P Wash
11 months ago
Reply to  farouk

And We all buy stupid amounts of Chinese stuff…. regardless. It will all end in tears at some point. why else would they be building an enormous fleet of assault ships, frigates, destroyers, aircraft carriers, aircraft, tanks…… ? yet we all buy their cheep shite……..

BB85
BB85
11 months ago
Reply to  Captain P Wash

When you compare the size of Asian navies compared to European navies its getting a bit scary.
If you add numbers for India, China, Japan and S Korea. Their navies completely dwarf Europe, no wonder Australia and Canada are ordering more T26 than us. Its getting to the point where the US might struggle to over match China on its own without support from Japan, S Korea and Australia.

David
David
11 months ago
Reply to  BB85

In my opinion, if it came to a shooting match between the US and China, the US submarine force will prove decisive in mitigating any advantage(s) the Chinese navy might have. US boats and crews are much better than their Chinese counterparts and will wreck havoc with their surface fleet.

Again, just my opinion.

ChariotRider
ChariotRider
10 months ago
Reply to  David

Hi David, There are a number of areas where the West may have an advantage. Damage control is a good example. The Royal Navy is recognised as being very good in this regard and is still influenceed by Battle Cruisers going bang in two world wars and of course experience during the Falklands War. I read somewhere a few years ago that the losses experienced by the Japanese Navy at the Battle of Midway were in part down to a serious neglect of damage control. It was not considered a sufficiently honorable undertaking within the context of the Bushido Code… Read more »

David
David
11 months ago

Be interesting to see how Typhoon faired against Rafale assuming all things being equal in the dogfight scenario. By all accounts, the pundits slate them as almost equal with a slight edge going to Typhoon but I have often wondered if that is just ‘arm-chair general’ talk. I would love to hear from someone who has first hand knowledge.

James
James
11 months ago
Reply to  David

One of those things lots would like to know but will probably never become public knowledge!

David
David
11 months ago
Reply to  James

Hi James,

I agree wholeheartedly but if I was a betting man, my money would be on Typhoon. Apparently at the Red Flag events in the US, Typhoon was a beast! I read – for what it’s worth – that it was considered a feather in the cap of a pilot if he got a Typhoon kill.

AJP1960
10 months ago
Reply to  James

I think altitude plays a part. One is better then the other at height whilst the situation is reversed at low level. I just wish I could remember which way round it was for the Typhoon. Good job I’m not a pilot, then.

David
David
10 months ago
Reply to  AJP1960

Hey AJP1960,

If I am not mistaken, Typhoon is better at higher altitude. At lower levels Typhoon performs similar to the F-16. I had read before – again, for what it’s worth – that US pilots flying F-16 and F-18, are taught to try to keep the fight at lower levels against Typhoon. As with all engagements, Pilot training and skill are as much a factor as the aircraft itself.

Daniel
Daniel
11 months ago
Reply to  David

Unless of course you ask French pundits 🙂