Lockheed Martin has announced the delivery of its 2,700th Hercules multi-mission tactical airlifter, according to a press release.

The landmark aircraft, a KC-130J Super Hercules tanker, has been delivered to the U.S. Marine Corps Aerial Refueler Transport Squadron 252 at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina.

The C-130 Hercules is renowned for its proven performance and versatility. Operators in 70 nations worldwide use the aircraft to support diverse missions.

“The Lockheed Martin team is honored to deliver this milestone Super Hercules to the U.S. Marine Corps, where it will be part of the largest KC-130J fleet in the world and provide true force amplification across the globe,” said Rod McLean, vice president and general manager of Lockheed Martin’s Air Mobility & Maritime Missions line of business.

“Not only does this Hercules represent the 2,700th C-130 delivered, but it also reflects the inherent mission and performance adaptability that fuels the C-130’s ongoing relevance.”

The KC-130J is a tactical tanker, capable of refueling the majority of rotary-wing aircraft in operation today as well as multiple fixed-wing aircraft, including the Lockheed Martin F-35B/C Lightning II fighter aircraft.

Its design allows it to fly at slow speeds and low altitudes, ideal for refueling helicopters.

The C-130J Super Hercules, the current production model, is certified to support 18 different mission requirements. The global C-130J fleet includes 540+ aircraft operated by 26 operators in 22 nations, with over 20 airworthiness certifications. The fleet has logged nearly 3 million flight hours.

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George has a degree in Cyber Security from Glasgow Caledonian University and has a keen interest in naval and cyber security matters and has appeared on national radio and television to discuss current events. George is on Twitter at @geoallison
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Geoff Roach
Geoff Roach (@guest_827770)
1 month ago

What did we do with ours. Oh yes, we threw them away. 😠

Ron
Ron (@guest_827772)
1 month ago
Reply to  Geoff Roach

Good question, what did we do with ours. Did we sell them off or scrap?

Iain
Iain (@guest_827779)
1 month ago
Reply to  Ron

We’ve just delivered the fifth of 5 C130Js to the Bangladesh Air Force. Another was sold to the USN as a Blue Angels support aircraft.

Paul T
Paul T (@guest_827866)
1 month ago
Reply to  Ron

They have been offered for sale and have buyers AFAIK.

Geoff Roach
Geoff Roach (@guest_827897)
1 month ago
Reply to  Ron

Up for sale I think but I don’t know for sure.

Mark B
Mark B (@guest_827787)
1 month ago
Reply to  Geoff Roach

Were the airframes not worn out?

Geoff Roach
Geoff Roach (@guest_827899)
1 month ago
Reply to  Mark B

Nope. Two years ago the plan was to run them for five year, maybe more. not sure about the actual time scale.

Knight7572
Knight7572 (@guest_827975)
1 month ago
Reply to  Geoff Roach

Yes they were arguably as the 2 surviving Lockheed C-130J-30 Hercules C.4 were between 24-27 years old and 8 Lockheed C-130J-30 Hercules C.5 were 25 years old but like a lot of Hercules fanboys who willfully ignore the fact that the war in Afghanistan and overseas global presence missions had worn out the airframes to the point to keep them in service, the wing box needed replacing

The thing that a lot forget is the Airbus A400M Atlas was supposed to be an RAF Lockheed C-130 Hercules replacement, just not the C-130Js but actually the RAF’s Lockheed C-130K Hercules C.1/C.3s

Geoff Roach
Geoff Roach (@guest_828013)
1 month ago
Reply to  Knight7572

There wasdefinetly a plan to keep both though but as you say maybe the state of the airframes overtook events

Knight7572
Knight7572 (@guest_828039)
1 month ago
Reply to  Geoff Roach

They must have plus with the whole stupid war of choice mentality, the politicians decided to have the A400M replace the C-130J something that it was not suppose to do

Geoff Roach
Geoff Roach (@guest_828047)
1 month ago
Reply to  Knight7572

I’m not sure how well there doing it either.

klonkie
klonkie (@guest_828021)
1 month ago
Reply to  Knight7572

Hi Knight . Mate, may understanding is the A400 was originally planned to replace the C130 K. The J model would continue to serve as a complimentary assets (circa 24 of each). 2010/15 defence review put that plan out to pasture- mores the pity.

I’m pleased that our RNZAF are onboarding 5 new J modes (crew conversion undertaking in the USA at present). Our Aussie cousins are likely to receive a further 24 in the early 2030’s, replacing the C27 and existing C130 J’S. Happy days!

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli (@guest_828193)
29 days ago
Reply to  klonkie

Correct.
Half the 50 strong Herc fleet was upgraded with 25 Js in the 90s.
The SF orientated Hercs were to continue into the 2030s after the 25, then 22, new Atlas came in.
It is a cut. Nothing more, nothing less, even if 8 C17 are considered.
Too few assets with no let up in taskings meaning they cannot do it all and something gives.

klonkie
klonkie (@guest_828242)
29 days ago

Hi DM. thanks Mate. I did think I had the numbers correct. It’s a sad affair re the cuts.

Jim
Jim (@guest_827996)
1 month ago
Reply to  Mark B

They were going to be retired in 2035. A load had new centre wing section fitted too.

Tommo
Tommo (@guest_828093)
1 month ago

Shame , would have loved too see whether one converted into a Spectre style gunship could have been feasible

Mike
Mike (@guest_828153)
29 days ago
Reply to  Tommo
Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli (@guest_828194)
29 days ago
Reply to  Tommo

Reports that UKSF wanted that when they worked with US examples.
I’d have been happy just to keep DSFs dedicated assets but of course HMG know different and prefer SF flap their flipping arms instead. Thinking of the Chinook deal they also wanted to bin.

geoff
geoff (@guest_828827)
27 days ago

Morning. An amazing aircraft. Therein lies the perfect lesson for the discussion here today on increasing the number of destroyers-numbers matter. At 2700 units, even given for some retooling and variants, the Hercules must be a spectacular financial and operational success story for everyone. I think the SAAF still operate some C 130’s but sadly maintenance is not a word our government understands across the board! Sad to see the RAF C130s go-another bad political decision it would seem. Pity such decisions could not be left to the Military brass rather then Whitehall penpushers😁 ps An RAF Hercules landed at… Read more »

Last edited 27 days ago by geoff