If every country was ‘as brave as Britain and Ukraine’ then Russia would have already lost, Ukrainian President Zelensky has said.

In a speech to the Chatham House think-tank, Zelensky said:

“If everyone in the world – or at least the vast majority – were steadfast and courageous leaders as Ukraine, as Britain, I am sure we would have already ended this war and restored peace throughout our liberated territory for all our people.

But we still have to fight. Fight. As you, Boris, said, addressing our Verkhovna Rada the day before yesterday, we are still writing one of the most victorious chapters in our history.

And now we can assess the significance of this chapter, in particular, by the following fact: 11,672 of our defenders have already been awarded state awards for courage and effective defense of Ukraine. In a little over ten weeks. 11,672 people.

And a few minutes before this address, I signed a decree awarding another 286 servicemen of the Armed Forces of Ukraine. It is on the shoulders of these brave warriors and their brothers-in-arms that Ukraine and, to be honest, the whole of Europe are now standing.

And I thank you for your really effective support of this struggle. Bravery is rightly believed the first of human qualities as it guarantees all others.

Thank you, Britain!”

On top of the £450m worth of aid already provided, Britain recently pledged more.

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson addressed Kyiv’s parliament on Tuesday, during which he announced a new £300million package of military support to the country.

The UK has already sent thousands of missiles, including anti-aircraft weapons in addition to armoured vehicles and other heavy weaponry. The new £300m military aid package will include electronic warfare equipment, a counter battery radar system, GPS jamming equipment and thousands of night vision devices.

George has a degree in Cyber Security from Glasgow Caledonian University and has a keen interest in naval and cyber security matters and has appeared on national radio and television to discuss current events. He also works for the NHS. George is on Twitter at @geoallison
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Andrew Thorne
Andrew Thorne
5 days ago

Just wondering where this superpower called the EU is now? I mean we were told the UK would be nothing if we left Europe. However, it looks like the UK are defenders of Europe and France and Germany are completely impotent and looking after their own financial interests. Moreover, the Irish are once again on the wrong side of history like they were with Germany – de Valera. The famous saying that Britain lost an Empire and failed to find a role now rings hollow. Just wish the British government would financially support our armed services more. Once again the… Read more »

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
5 days ago
Reply to  Andrew Thorne

If push ever came to shove there are few European countries I would personally rely upon to come to our aid in a time of need.

Poland, Holland, Sweedwn, Finland, Norway, Ukraine, as for France, Spain and Germany? NATO looks good on paper, but I would far sooner have the capabilities required to defend the UK than be found wanting further down the line.

And before the usual ” where’s the money coming from” replies!

https://www.theweek.co.uk/news/defence/956006/uk-defence-spending

Grizzler
Grizzler
5 days ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Two months old and already out of date…..did Sunak increase defence spending…have we decided to re-evaluate our position..and reassess the Defence review ..I havent seen anything.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
5 days ago
Reply to  Grizzler

It’s more about the change in people’s opinion in relation to defence spending, both inside parliament and outside.

https://committees.parliament.uk/committee/360/international-relations-and-defence-committee/news/165261/uks-defence-capabilities-and-aspirations-inquiry-launched/

Last edited 5 days ago by Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
5 days ago
Reply to  Chris

She makes some very interesting points. Hopefully, we will find the best way to incorporate this into defence.

Chris
Chris
5 days ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

I thaught we already had something similar, I can’t remember the name but it was something Gavin Williamson launched.

James H
James H
5 days ago
Reply to  Grizzler

Re-evaluate might mean there might need to be some admission of a mistake or miscalculation of the situation.
If you were to take Ajax as an example or any of the recent armour programmes I only feel whoever makes these decisions at the top are incapable of such a process.

Sean
Sean
5 days ago
Reply to  Grizzler

Well we just confirmed we’re buying another 26 F35s…

James H
James H
5 days ago
Reply to  Sean

Well we planned to order 138 and now we are at 48 confirmed but with the crash down to 47.
Not really a re evaluation on I was looking for.

James
James
5 days ago
Reply to  James H

Exactly we ‘planned’ to purchase 138 in total over the life of the airframe, as 48 are ‘confirmed’ thats 48 more than planned.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
5 days ago
Reply to  James H

Here are some of the reasons for the slow buy rate and the limited number purchased so far. The US was supposed to be replacing their ageing F-16 fleet (600) with the f-35. I wonder how that will reflect on future prices if they choose not to? https://www.pogo.org/analysis/2022/03/f-35-program-stagnated-in-2021-but-dod-testing-office-hiding-full-extent-of-problem/ “Let’s fast forward to the 2035/2036-ish timeframe. Is there still a need for that low-cost platform? I think, right now, there is,” he said. “And what does it look like? Do we replace it with another F-16-looking thing? Did the F-35 come down in cost enough that we can buy more of… Read more »

Last edited 5 days ago by Nigel Collins
grizzler
grizzler
5 days ago
Reply to  Sean

Yes and thats fair comment I’ll give you that but surely they were always going to bought to maximize the potential in the carriers weren’t they?- christ I hope they were anyway you never know I suppose! ..In fact some (me included) may say theres a need for a dozen or so more. I was more discussing in general terms regards the successive SSDR’s that just seem to reduce capability- Theres nothing really strategic about any of them really is there? At the very least the upgrade numbers to the C3 should be increased and AJAX sorted …fix it or… Read more »

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
4 days ago
Reply to  grizzler

I always assumed that a goood percentage of the 138 would go to the RAF to operate from land air bases, but have never seen the breakdown.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
4 days ago
Reply to  Sean

So we are well on the way to buying the 138 (figure set a long time ago, now, but not matched by orders)

Sean
Sean
4 days ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

That plan for 138 was made many years ago, the world has changed considerably since. I doubt we’ll see that many, instead drones will be added to the carriers in large numbers. From small cheap and sacrificeable drones to high-end loyal wingmen types. We’ll get just punch as originally planned, but for less cost.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
3 days ago
Reply to  Sean

Can a drone do all that a F-35B can do?

Sean
Sean
3 days ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

No, but then there’s things a drone can do that an F35B can’t do. And we’re certain to see an exponential increase in the capabilities of drones over the next decade.

Jonesy
Jonesy
2 days ago
Reply to  Sean

The plan for 138 aircraft was over the entire UK service life of the type. The earliest bought planes will age and expire their airframe lives and need to be replaced. The 138 number was including those replacements. We were never to have 138 operational at the same time.

We were supposed to have 48 in 4 frontline squadrons and a number more in a 2nd line Operational Conversion Unit or training squadron thats all.

Last edited 2 days ago by Jonesy
David_s
David_s
5 days ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Completely on the money there; do you remember when the last but one muppet in Downing Street signed a ‘defence cooperation agreement’ with France? Of the 195 countries in the world, France is is 194th on the list of countries that would come to our aid, if we ever needed it – I am not joking when I say that North Korea would give more serious consideration to helping us than the French would: look at Calais, France are ACTIVELY encouraging people to illegally come to this country, the attitude of France during COVID with regards to vaccines without doubt… Read more »

James
James
5 days ago
Reply to  David_s

I honestly dont understand why we give the French the time of day, or even assist them in military means. As soon as the Brexit deal was signed we should have stopped all cooperation with them. People go on about Boris being a tosser Macron is certainly in line for the top gong in that field.

grizzler
grizzler
5 days ago
Reply to  James

If he hasn’t a nice medal already I’m sure hes designing one as we speak- probably containing some sort of Monkey motiff.

Rob N
Rob N
5 days ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

It is telling how many friends of the UK you mention come from northern Europe. … I think we should recognise this and build even better links with the north and leave the southern Europeans to their fate. For years the EU has been desperate to try and convince the UK that it is just another small, weak European state that cannot survive without the big strong EU. We have now emerged from the EU spell and once again have taken our place as an outward looking global focused state that has influence well beyond our shores. we have seen… Read more »

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
5 days ago
Reply to  Rob N

I think it would be prudent to increase defence spending further over the next 10yrs as we live in very uncertain times!

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
4 days ago
Reply to  Rob N

True, it was only immmense pressure from the EU hierarchy that stopped France quite recently selling naval vessels to Russia.

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
4 days ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Totally true.

Hollander was all set to push it through.

Can you imagine 2 x modern assault helicopter carriers with CIWS that worked?

Mr Bell
Mr Bell
4 days ago

Odessa would have fallen in first week of the war.

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
4 days ago
Reply to  Mr Bell

Spot on

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
4 days ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

The ‘where’s the money coming from’ point is tiring. We used to find up to 5% of GDP at various points in the Cold War. Defence of the nation and her people is the first priority of Government.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
4 days ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Exactly Graham, and we can find it again as people are far more aware of the threats posed to us by Russia.

Even the Swiss are changing their viewpoint seeking closer cooperation with Nato while Germany can find an extra 100 Billion.

This content was published on April 17, 2022 – 12:00
April 17, 2022 – 12:00

“Most Swiss want to see closer cooperation with intergovernmental defence alliance NATO, according to a representative survey. However, they do not want to become a member.”

https://www.swissinfo.ch/eng/swiss-against-joining-nato-but-in-favour-of-closer-cooperation/47522862

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
4 days ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

But I don’t think we need 5%?

3% would give a huge uplift to the equipment budget. In a lot of cases we simply need to buy more of what we already have that works perfectly well.

The main thing is to avoid too many money pit R&D projects……we had that conversation a few times already….

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
3 days ago

Didn’t say we needed 5% now but have done in the past. I agree that 3% is a good target, and that we need more of what we have now – but to also close out current and projected capability gaps, where there is zero equipment! We must buy more equipment that is proven in service with other countries.

Sean
Sean
5 days ago
Reply to  Andrew Thorne

You’re right about the Irish.
This war is even making the Swiss reconsider their traditional neutrality…

James
James
5 days ago
Reply to  Andrew Thorne

Exactly, Macron the closet baguette eater put on a good show at the start of the war as funnily enough he had elections coming up now hes seemingly vanished, except for the odd phone call with Putin which really doesnt seem to help anything. Germany o.k has actually done a few bits and pieces which is a few more than expected but just like during Brexit when they actually realised it was happening s*it themselves and went into a flurry to get a defence pact with the U.K. They clearly will still want to rely on external countries to help… Read more »

Shaun
Shaun
5 days ago
Reply to  Andrew Thorne

They should, they won’t.

FOSTERSMAN
FOSTERSMAN
4 days ago
Reply to  Andrew Thorne

How the Hungarians are in NATO is embarrassing

Rob N
Rob N
23 minutes ago
Reply to  FOSTERSMAN

The more the merrier…

David Barry
David Barry
5 days ago

References Britain how many times? References Bluffer?

This guy can read tea leaves and has taken the pulse of our nation.

Grizzler
Grizzler
5 days ago
Reply to  David Barry

What are you on about?

David Barry
David Barry
5 days ago
Reply to  Grizzler

Bluffer has tried to leverage his ‘relationship’ with the war in Ukraine and ‘his’ support in its defence

Fail.

Sean
Sean
5 days ago
Reply to  David Barry

You’re the one wasting his time trying to divine the future in tea leaves, seeing things that aren’t there, simply to satisfy your deranged political hatred 🤦🏻‍♂️

David Barry
David Barry
5 days ago
Reply to  Sean

Yes, of course dear.

James
James
5 days ago
Reply to  David Barry

Whats the alternative Starmer? He would try and bore the opponent to death whilst Europe is being taken over, then eventually decide from his legal expertise that they arent in the wrong, just like he turned a blind eye to Saville.

David Barry
David Barry
5 days ago
Reply to  James

Well, throwing something disproven at someone, do try harder.

James
James
5 days ago
Reply to  David Barry

Hardly disproven, the police had cases against him active whilst Starmer was in charge. Bojo was right to call him out on it but did it in the wrong way, as usual.

Apologies if I touched on a person you wish to defend as you clearly have a massive dislike of the current political leadership but Starmer is a much use as a candle in a hurricane.

John Clark
John Clark
5 days ago
Reply to  James

A little balance … Starmer is a better party leader than Boris, he’s relatively considered in his actions to be fair … That said, Boris sets a low benchmark to be fair! Negatives with Starmer, he’s simply not a ‘leader’. His legal background makes him dither and delay , rather than take decisive action and he’s easily led. Look at the absolutely cringing TV appearance taking the knee, looking ‘deeply’ uncomfortable… Now Boris has been filmed hanging from a flying fox (and many other buffoon related appearances), looking an utter tit, but he owns it and dosen’t give a toss.… Read more »

David Barry
David Barry
3 days ago
Reply to  John Clark

While you could commend his action wrt to prosecution over beergate, your point that he differs is well made: it took him four days.

David Barry
David Barry
5 days ago
Reply to  James

Yes, I take your point, Admiral Leach should have been Courts Martialled for the loss of Sheffield and Coventry.

Yes. Absolutely. 100%. Can’t think of a better idea.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
4 days ago
Reply to  David Barry

How was Adm Leach responsible for the loss of those 2 ships (but not the others)?

David Barry
David Barry
3 days ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Well, according to James, he probably was…

(Sorry for late reply).

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
4 days ago
Reply to  James

James, I think the last point is untrue.

Chris
Chris
5 days ago

A little more info about what additional aid we are sending. Great to see https://www.gov.uk/government/news/hundreds-more-mobile-generators-to-provide-vital-power-for-ukraine

Last edited 5 days ago by Chris
Coll
Coll
5 days ago

For some reason, I let out a slight giggle at freedom and Britain being the same sentence. I don’t know why.

Last edited 5 days ago by Coll
geoff
geoff
5 days ago
Reply to  Coll

Think about it Coll and do let us know why?

Farouk
Farouk
5 days ago

Very interesting thermal mode video from the other day taken by a TB2 UAV which shows a couple of Ukrainian SU 27 striking Snake Island
https://twitter.com/conflicts/status/1523042592547561472?s=21&t=NNLqw9x7DZXH8SUe9aJf9w

James H
James H
5 days ago

This site seems to have become far more political recently, which then leads to a lot more disagreement about politics in the comments.
But I’m sure many would disagree.

Coll
Coll
5 days ago
Reply to  James H

Don’t worry. I have thought the same.

Sean
Sean
5 days ago
Reply to  James H

Some people have to politicise everything because they are full of so much hatred and bile. It’s sad really…

Steven Alfred Rake
Steven Alfred Rake
5 days ago
Reply to  Sean

Its not about hatred and bile as you put it, its about putting the UK’s armed forces back on the right track, when Putin decided to invade the Ukraine both sides of the house were talking about 3%GDP on defence but now we are being walked back from that but our political elite, but it is not just about the money it is also accountability for the years of ineptitude in the decision making in the MoD and the Military with projects like Ajax being seen as an utter waste of the defence budget. Iv noticed in the short time… Read more »

grizzler
grizzler
5 days ago

It will be interesting to see what – if anything- actually comes out of this regards a long term re-evaluation of defence strategy & associated funding.
I have to agree with you will be surprised if anything does- lets see shall we.
Thats not meant as a political statement as I’m sure if that discussion does take place we will see both sodes of the house contributing to that debate.

Steven Alfred Rake
Steven Alfred Rake
5 days ago
Reply to  grizzler

I tend to believe that the first party that puts aside Wokeisum and puts real money towards the Defence department by stopping the monetary aid to the likes of Pakistan and India will be in power for some time. I am one of the few who actually has confidence in the British public to do the right thing and I also believe that the vast majority have had enough of the all these minority groups dictating to the majority what we can and cannot do. I believe 100% that we should be helping the Ukraine but at the same time… Read more »

geoff
geoff
5 days ago
Reply to  James H

Agree James but sometimes it is difficult to seperate the political element out of Defence related topics, especially with the ongoing War in Ukraine

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
4 days ago
Reply to  geoff

“but sometimes it is difficult to seperate the political element out of Defence” Morning geoff. Spot on, it is impossible to, because many of us here rightly fear what happens to the so called special relationship, our expeditionary operations overseas, overseas bases, our future in NATO, and so on, should the left side of the Labour party gain power. LP Membership already voted against AUKUS, Young Labour are against NATO, and Momentum still lurk beneath the surface. If we had a wide consensus on both sides of the political spectrum like in Australia regards a strong defence it would help… Read more »

geoff
geoff
4 days ago

Hello Danielle. 100% agree. The whole subject of Armed Forces is inextricably linked to the structure of the country in which they are based and by association, the relationships they have with allies and enemies. Sometimes we stray perhaps away from the core to issues which might be regarded as pure politics-my occasional forays against my Nationalist friends in Ireland might fall under this heading😂 but the politics is often the key. Putin for example and his evil war against Ukraine is a perfect example. He has used twisted logic such as comparing some of the Americans interventions over the… Read more »

Last edited 4 days ago by geoff
Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
4 days ago
Reply to  James H

Recently? I think it’s actually receded.
The fights we, myself included, used to have on here regards Brexit, Corbyn, the loony left, and so on.

Today it is almost cordial…

James H
James H
4 days ago

True but it would be nice if the actual post was discussed more often instead of the politics of the day. Which is exactly what has happened in this post.
Furthermore this post could document the support Ukraine has received from everyone and be a bit more of a rounded story instead it comes across as a political narrative in support of the current government instead of being neutral.
I just prefer a time before brexit, when people with great knowledge contributed to what is happening in defence rather then infighting because of each others political views.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
4 days ago
Reply to  James H

Fair enough James.
TBF to UKDJ there have been previous articles where contributions by varied nations were listed.
Threads often slide off tangent, agreed, and I’m not innocent of that either.

David_s
David_s
5 days ago

I am full on with sending as much aid as possible to Ukraine – this is actually useful foreign aid….I think just a little better than funding pop groups in Kenya, or paying for the poor in India so the government there can spend their money on space telescopes and Russian weapons. However I do worry that we have not seen any concrete plans for an increase for any of the armed services – I have a concern that complacency might be a factor, are they seeing how badly Russian equipment is performing and thinking that we have them beat?… Read more »

Sean
Sean
5 days ago
Reply to  David_s

They haven’t emboldened China.

Rather the Chinese are aghast at how the West has moved pretty much together to support Ukraine and wreak havoc on Russia with various sanctions, embargoes etc. It’s now pretty clear to China they will need to plan ahead to ensure their economy isn’t brought to its knees the same way that Russia’s is gradually being ground down.

David_s
David_s
5 days ago
Reply to  Sean

I don’t think China are aghast at all; we can see that they have their note books out, and are looking at the sanctions and right at this moment they are tweaking parts of their economy to insulate themselves from they type of sanctions levied on Russia. The Chinese economy anyway is very different from Russia in a number of ways, a good example is the stock exchange, the vast majority of shares are owned by the government or by state officials – the public generally invests in real estate….this fact is actually a is a ticking time bomb, one… Read more »

James
James
5 days ago
Reply to  David_s

The Chinese currency is certainly undervalued for the reason you say, exactly why Germany forced the Euro on the EU to make sure it remained the dominant exporter for Europe.

Sean
Sean
5 days ago
Reply to  James

Agreed, though more and more companies are still finding that costs are going up as the country becomes more affluent, and are beginning to transfer manufacturing to cheaper countries such as India, Vietnam, Brazil, etc.

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
5 days ago
Reply to  Sean

Agree

Sean
Sean
5 days ago
Reply to  David_s

I agree on everything except, like Russia, they never anticipated the West as showing this much solidarity. They both perceive the West as weak and divided because of our democracy, when of course it is our strength. They won’t be affected by sanctions as much as Russia because Russia’s economy was flawed anyway, being dependent on fossil fuel exports to survive. It will also be far more painful for the West to sanction China too, simply due to all the manufacturing we’ve offshored there. Finally, like Russia they have already begun to strengthen their economy against Western sanctions/boycotts, but will… Read more »

Jon
Jon
5 days ago
Reply to  Sean

If the lack of supply of Ukrainian wheat and Russian gas has had such a huge effect on worldwide prices, imagine what it would be like if it was Taiwanese silicon and Chinese manufactured goods. The worlds largest producer of silicon chips is in Taiwan, and only they can produce the best quality and highest density. The next best is South Korea, which also might get dragged into any local conflict. As well as increasing our ability to project military power as a deterrent, we should follow the US lead by developing chip manfacturing plants in the UK. Making ourselves… Read more »

James
James
5 days ago
Reply to  Jon

The chip shortage worldwide is still hammering production for alot of companies, the chips exist they just arent leaving China.

grizzler
grizzler
5 days ago
Reply to  Jon

making ourselves independant of Chinese manufacturing will be nigh on impossible. There were musings after the COVID impact by some in government that we should start to look to readdress that situation but of course too many people have vested interests so it never got anywhere (EU signed a trade deal with China during 2020 as well ). If this doesn’t make the West sit up and take notice nothing will , long term stratgey shoud be to bring manufacturing out of China before its too late… As has been said Tiawan produce the silicon chips..if China invades – we… Read more »

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
4 days ago
Reply to  Jon

I agree. We should be independent of Russia for oil and gas – and independent for strategically vital products such as computer chips, certain weapons and platforms etc. Be great if we could be independent for energy overall and food (that last one is very difficult).

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
5 days ago
Reply to  Sean

The Russian kleptocrats stole the
money that was needed to invest.

The Chinese kleptocrats own the shares and take dividends so the business still grows.

Russia depending on selling oil/gas to pay for the theft.

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
5 days ago
Reply to  David_s

A very interesting argument.

I do partially agree with you.

China can be brought to its knees if we stopped buying all the tat from them. They are a good exporter. A lot of what is made there could be onshored if the appropriate tax breaks were given. Making things in China with a long slow and expensive supply chain is no longer a slam dunk. The supply chain side alone predicates a move to onshore so as to increase timeliness and control.

JohninMK
JohninMK
5 days ago

China builds export goods to contract, specify the highest quality, I-Phones etc and you get it, specify ‘tat’ as you put it and that’s what you get as well. Blame those buying from China for what we get, not automatically the Chinese.

Here we have a range of problems counting against onshoring, one of which is real estate, as most of the land we did use is now business/retail parks or housing. Many in society would scream blue murder if more green fields were to be concreted over.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
4 days ago
Reply to  Sean

China always plays the long game….and smartly. The demise of Russia (poor political judgements by Putin, below par performance of their military and loss of militray manpower and materiel) makes even clearer that Russia is the junior partner (plus the imbalance in economic strength). Reduces the threat from Russia to China (huge land border). Smart for China to keep on-side her biggest trading partners (pretty much all ‘western’ countries) and offer little real support to Russia, whilst learning lessons from Russia that may help them plan the invasion of Taiwan – or realise that such a move would be so… Read more »

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
4 days ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

In order to play the smart long game you must never overplay your hand.

Quentin D63
Quentin D63
5 days ago

Carry On 🇬🇧. You’re doing good!

farouk
farouk
5 days ago

Most interesting: (Taken from ISW) The Ukrainian counteroffensive northeast of Kharkiv is making significant progress and will likely advance to the Russian border in the coming days or weeks. Russian forces may be conducting a limited withdrawal in the face of successful Ukrainian attacks and reportedly destroyed three bridges to slow the Ukrainian advance. Armies generally only destroy bridges if they have largely decided they will not attempt to cross the river in the other direction anytime soon; Russian forces are therefore unlikely to launch operations to retake the northeast outskirts of Kharkiv liberated by Ukrainian forces in the near future.… Read more »

Kharkiv Battle Map Draft May 7,2022.png
JohninMK
JohninMK
5 days ago
Reply to  farouk

The alternate view is that Ukrainian forces, when hunkered down in built up areas are very difficult to defeat, but when they are out in the open they are far more exposed. Time will tell if it is a trap and they have been lured out of relative safety.

The Ukrainians did instal a couple of pontoon bridges, fixed just below the surface of the river as a kind of natural camouflage, but one has been bombed.

Airborne
Airborne
4 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Time will tell if it’s a trap ha ha hahaaaa FFS you do talk some chuff, exactly the same predictions you have been spewing for the last 3 months! Setting a trap at even the tactical level is beyond your Russkie rapists ability! And yet again, your Russian amateurs are still not doing very well with plan C are they? Next plan? D, then E, Then?

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
4 days ago
Reply to  Airborne

The way I see it, that UKR offensive is designed to threaten the Russians northern flank as they try to advance on the Izhym front.
Might make the reds pause or pull forces back.
A trap….my foot.

Farouk
Farouk
4 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

JIMK wrote: “”The alternate view is that Ukrainian forces, when hunkered down in built up areas are very difficult to defeat, but when they are out in the open they are far more exposed. Time will tell if it is a trap and they have been lured out of relative safety.”” and you arrived at all that without taking into account , the lay of the land. ( I mean have you even looked at a map of the area, as it really would help if you did) the effectiveness of the miltary units who had been rerouted to the… Read more »

Farouk
Farouk
4 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

JIMK wrote:
“The Ukrainians did instal a couple of pontoon bridges, fixed just below the surface of the river as a kind of natural camouflage, but one has been bombed.””

thats strange as what I read is that the Russians retreating from the advancing Ukrainians destroyed 3 bridges in which to secure their retreat. Also the only pontoon bridge destroyed I’ve also read about in the east was a Russian one by the Ukraine:

Last edited 4 days ago by Farouk
Farouk
Farouk
4 days ago
Reply to  Farouk

Oh here’s the evidence regards that Russian Bridge.

8332B5EF-629E-4D53-A510-A89C646C95D3.jpeg
JohninMK
JohninMK
2 days ago
Reply to  Farouk

Apologies for the delay but I’ve only just re-found the link to the Ukrainian pontoon being struck.

https://twitter.com/200_zoka/status/1522979476447055873

farouk
farouk
5 days ago

By all indications, Russian forces will announce the creation of a Kherson People’s Republic or possibly directly forcibly annex Kherson Oblast in the coming weeks and possibly as soon as May 9, though the Kremlin is not bound to this date. The Ukrainian General Staff reported Russian forces are taking a number of unspecified measures to strengthen the Russian occupation regime in Kherson and increased the number of checkpoints and foot patrols throughout the city.[19] DNR leader Denis Pushilin arrived in Kherson on May 6.[20] ISW cannot confirm what he did during his visit, though it likely concerned establishing some form of… Read more »

Kherson and Mykolaiv Battle Map Draft May 7,2022.png
Jacko
Jacko
5 days ago
Reply to  farouk

Thanks for that as you say most interesting.

Sean
Sean
5 days ago
Reply to  farouk

It fits the Russian modus operandi of what has happened elsewhere, such as Crimea.

JohninMK
JohninMK
5 days ago
Reply to  farouk

One of the ‘unspecified measures’ is moving the currency being used from Ukrainian to Russian over the next 4 months with Russian banks opening branches. Another, as the Ukrainians turned off the mobile phone system, is that it is now also Russian based. Looks like they are settling in for the long haul.

Meanwhile in Mariupol, as the only fighting is in the Azovstal plant, parts of the rest of the city are starting back towards life.

farouk
farouk
5 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

JIMK wrote:

Meanwhile in Mariupol, as the only fighting is in the Azovstal plant, parts of the rest of the city are starting back towards life.

Are you for F-ing real below is a screen dump of a video of the city of Mariupol it can be seen here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EDJVeO_Mw0g

Virtually everything you post is misinformation nobody sees you as a realiable sourse of information, so why do you bother posting here.

Opera Snapshot_2022-05-08_191706_www.youtube.com.png
Airborne
Airborne
4 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Starting back towards life? Jesus Christ you talk some chuff! Your russkie rapists have smashed the city, what life are the people going to have, being controlled by rapists, murderers and looters! But don’t worry it will be Ukrainian again in the future! And Russian currency? Ha ha ha I’ve got some soil in my garden worth more!

John Clark
John Clark
4 days ago
Reply to  Airborne

I wouldn’t bother Airborne, he’s just an agitator mate….

Posse Comitatus
Posse Comitatus
4 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Must be a great lifestyle, salvaging the few remaining belongings from their destroyed households, burying dead family and friends, trying to find shelter, avoiding rape and abduction from the Chechen and Russian death squads, etc. Why not head over there and try it?

simon alexander
simon alexander
5 days ago

EU overly dependent on energy from a despot, whatever we spent on UK defense would not alter EU /German failings. Permitting Nord 2 pipeline was a massive negligence by Germany.

JohninMK
JohninMK
5 days ago

Despots and oil seem to go together, vide the Middle East, Libya etc. Both us and the US/EU happily buy from them when it suits us, they just have to be ‘our’ kind of despots.

farouk
farouk
5 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

JIMK wrote:

Despots and oil seem to go together, vide the Middle East, Libya etc. Both us and the US/EU happily buy from them when it suits us, they just have to be ‘our’ kind of despots.

Left out Putin and Mother Russia

JohninMK
JohninMK
4 days ago
Reply to  farouk

They were already covered by Simon Alexander’s post so I didn’t think it necessary.

Airborne
Airborne
4 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Why don’t you reply to the question that you seem to have a problem with your supposed Ukrainian Nazis, but ok with the Russian rapists, looters, torturers and murderers? Can you answer that question for us all to see?

Airborne
Airborne
4 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Yaaaaaaawn, any condemnation of Putins illegal invasion of Ukraine yet?

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
4 days ago

I understand it was all Merkel’s fault as she wanted nuclear power genration phased out, so had to take Russkie petrochemicals in abundance.

Michael S.
Michael S.
5 days ago

The EU is taking 5 million refugees from UK. How many is the UK taking currently?

Germany is the biggest financial supporter of Ukraine by far and has been so for several years. Just because you do not understand how the EU works and how much Britain loses from Brexit does not make the EU support insignificant.

JohninMK
JohninMK
4 days ago
Reply to  Michael S.

Drove down the A34 to Oxford this afternoon behind what looked to be a nearly new Mercedes SUV and it was on Ukrainian plates. Maybe more of them here than we think, certainly the ones who got out first who were likely to have been the wealthier, more educated ones, who drove here as ‘tourists’..

Airborne
Airborne
4 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Yaaaaaaawn! Any condemnation of Putins illegal invasion of Ukraine yet?

John Clark
John Clark
4 days ago
Reply to  Airborne

Special Military Operation if you don’t mind Airborne, it’s all about liberating the Ukrainians from their freedom you see….

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
4 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

How many Russian oligarchs in the west driving fancy cars?

Posse Comitatus
Posse Comitatus
4 days ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Were they nazis or Ukrainians?? Did you declare them as fascists and force them off the road in a ‘special civilian operation ‘ as you sang patriotic songs about the motherland?

Day 75 of Russia’s invasion and the Ukrainian president is able to openly walk down Kyiv’s thoroughfares !! Remind us all , which plan is the Russian military on now? C , D or E ?

John Clark
John Clark
4 days ago
Reply to  Michael S.

That old line …. The UK has unshackled itself from the EU and gained it’s independence, we can do as we wish and we are no longer a small cog in a clunking inefficient monolithic bureaucracy…

Freedom is what we actually won, it comes at a price, but it’s always one worth paying.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
4 days ago
Reply to  John Clark

YEEEES!!!!! Another thing worth noting is that success will not happen overnight, it takes time just as it took time to be unbound from the EU.

God Bless Nigel Farage!!!!!

John Clark
John Clark
4 days ago

Absolutely Daniele….

WSM
WSM
3 days ago
Reply to  Michael S.

In what way ? Certainly not militarily as UK has been training UKR Armed Forces since 2015 and has supplied them with the highest quantity of ordnance (second only to the US)
But don’t take my word for it , simply search for Zelensky’s quotes praising UK Prime Minister and the people of Britain – how many of his speeches mentioned Germany’s “efforts” ?!

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
4 days ago

£750m aid to Ukraine, mostly, I think, lethal aid. All of which I appprove of. But how much more for UK Defence in the light of yet another example of blatant Russian revanchism? No announcement in Sunak’s last budget.

dan
dan
4 days ago

He only mentions Biden when he has too. He knows Biden has been in the White House both times Putin has invaded Ukraine. And Biden hasn’t even bothered to visit Ukraine like Boris and most other European leaders. So sad to see America taking a back seat in dealing with Putin. Well Biden did send his wife to Ukraine. lol