At the First Sea Lord’s Sea Power Conference held at Lancaster House in London, Minister for the Indo-Pacific Anne-Marie Trevelyan delivered a stirring keynote speech emphasising the critical role of the Royal Navy in maintaining global security and the importance of increased defence spending.

“Thank you to the First Sea Lord and the Council for Geostrategy for bringing us all together once again,” began Trevelyan, acknowledging the significance of the gathering.

The Minister expressed her gratitude to the Royal Navy, stating, “I would like to thank you and all those who serve in the Royal Navy – above and below the surface – for all that you do to keep our citizens and UK interests secure every single day.”

Trevelyan highlighted the Royal Navy’s often-unseen efforts, pointing to recent high-profile operations such as those conducted by HMS Diamond in the Red Sea. “Young men and women aboard HMS Diamond shared the dramatic images of their elimination of drones attacking civilian shipping in the Red Sea,” she said. These actions, she noted, have brought newfound public recognition and pride in the Navy’s continuous deployments.

Trevelyan also praised the collaboration with international partners, highlighting HMS Tamar and HMS Spey’s work in the Indo-Pacific. “Our sailors aboard HMS Tamar and HMS Spey in particular are working with countries in the Indo-Pacific, to build and protect sustainable blue economies,” she said, referring to the UK’s £500 million Blue Planet Fund.

One of the key announcements in Trevelyan’s speech was the government’s commitment to increasing defence spending to 2.5% of GDP. She stressed the need for an integrated procurement model to ensure long-term planning in shipbuilding and the swift introduction of next-generation ships and submarines. “We must now make industry the sixth domain of our defences,” she emphasised.

Addressing global security challenges, Trevelyan remarked on the interconnectedness of foreign and domestic policies. She highlighted the instability in the Middle East, aggression in the Black Sea, and military coercion in the South China Sea as significant threats. “Households everywhere are feeling the pressure of all this on their budgets,” she noted, emphasising the impact on everyday citizens.

Trevelyan outlined the UK’s efforts to support its Indo-Pacific partners through initiatives such as the AUKUS agreement, aimed at developing a nuclear-powered submarine fleet with Australia and the US. She emphasised the strategic importance of this partnership, stating, “Nuclear-powered submarines can travel greater distances, be undetected for longer, and therefore increase the credible deterrence.”

The Minister also discussed the importance of upholding international maritime laws and responding to actions that heighten tensions, specifically pointing to recent incidents in the South China Sea involving Chinese vessels. “We expect all states to uphold UNCLOS,” she stated.

As the speech drew to a close, Trevelyan reiterated the importance of strong alliances and the role of industry in supporting defence efforts. “Governments can and must provide the money and the leadership, but only industry can give us the tools to enable our brave military personnel to deliver that credible deterrence,” she concluded.

Trevelyan’s speech at the First Sea Lord’s Sea Power Conference highlighted the vital role of the Royal Navy in global security and the government’s commitment to enhancing defence capabilities through increased spending and international partnerships.

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George has a degree in Cyber Security from Glasgow Caledonian University and has a keen interest in naval and cyber security matters and has appeared on national radio and television to discuss current events. George is on Twitter at @geoallison
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Jon
Jon (@guest_818972)
2 days ago

Does the Blue Planet Fund support Pitcairn’s lackluster economy?

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker (@guest_819002)
2 days ago
Reply to  Jon

Could have bought an extra type 31 frigate for that cash.

Jon
Jon (@guest_819026)
2 days ago
Reply to  Monkey spanker

This is Foreign Office money! Don’t you mean, we could have bought an extra shady dictator for that cash? 😁

Mark B
Mark B (@guest_819027)
2 days ago
Reply to  Monkey spanker

Hope you’re joking mate. Our seas and oceans die we are all brown bread.

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker (@guest_819004)
2 days ago

These ministers all bang the same broken drum. Increasing defence budget! Not today or this year but soon, honestly we can be trusted. Don’t look at our actions look at what we promise. Yawn

Mark B
Mark B (@guest_819024)
2 days ago
Reply to  Monkey spanker

If she said we would have 30 more frigates by next Tuesday – I’m not sure anyone would believe that either. There are as many priorities as there are interested parties. I think deciding how to splash the cash might take a while.😀

Jon
Jon (@guest_819074)
1 day ago
Reply to  Mark B

It’s already been announced where it will be splashed. People need to read the report (Defending Britain). The numbers are clear. Of the £75bn, £55bn extra would be needed to maintain the current 2.3% GDP (to cover growth and inflation on current commitments), £20bn is new money. It will be spent on newly announced commitments: – Munitions and stockpiling (£10bn over a decade) – R&D (5% of total defence budget = £8.8bn increase over 7 years) – Service family accommodation (£6bn over a decade) – Annual increase to Ukraine of £500m (up to £3.5bn over 7 years) – New Strategic… Read more »

Graham Moore
Graham Moore (@guest_819625)
7 minutes ago
Reply to  Jon

I am glad you have posted this. So many folk have been playing ‘fantasy procurement’ including suggesting MoD can now afford to buy an IFV fleet to replace Warrior, buy a 5th SSBN etc.

Truth is we can buy no additional new equipment given that allocation.

Challenger
Challenger (@guest_819021)
2 days ago

Listening to the current shower of ministers saying we should put more money in X or sort out the problems with Y as if they aren’t part of a party or government that’s responsible and been responsible for 14 years is getting pretty tedious.

Paul Bestwick
Paul Bestwick (@guest_819038)
2 days ago

To be fair AM Trevelyan has been a consistent supporter of the RN. One of the few on either side of the house.

rmj
rmj (@guest_819099)
1 day ago
Reply to  Paul Bestwick

She might be a supporter but her speech is ignorant of the fact thanks to her govt we’re down to just 15 escorts. For an island and once ruler of the waves this is rock bottom leadership!

Graham Moore
Graham Moore (@guest_819627)
5 minutes ago
Reply to  rmj

A year or so ago, several influential Americans said we no longer had a Tier 1 army. Might they now say this about our Navy?