Typhoon jets have hit Islamic State targets in northern Iraq.

The Royal Air Force continues to fly daily armed reconnaissance missions over Iraq and eastern Syria as part of the global coalition against the Islamic State terrorist movement, say the MoD.

On Friday the 10th of April, a patrol conducted air strikes in support of a counter-terrorism operation in northern Iraq.

“The pair of Typhoons, assisted by an RAF Reaper aircraft, identified Daesh terrorists occupying a group of fortified buildings in an isolated location west of Tuz Khurma, known to be inhabited by active terrorist commanders and fighters. The aircraft conducted a thorough check of the area for non-combatants, before using a combination of precision guided bombs to destroy the buildings.

The surveillance aircraft continued to scan the area, confirming that all weapons had struck their targets and there was no collateral damage. Subsequent intelligence indicated that it was a successful operation, removing several Daesh fighters from the battlefield and further degrading the terrorist movement.”

Defence Secretary Ben Wallace said:

“Britain’s adversaries have not let Covid-19 stop them posing a risk to our citizens and allies. It is for that reason that Defence continues to take whatever steps are necessary – at home and abroad – to keep the nation safe. The use of RAF jets and a Reaper aircraft to deliver a successful strike against Daesh terrorists and their hide out demonstrates that the UK’s Defence never sleeps and will always do what is necessary to protect our people.”

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Petejohno
Petejohno
5 months ago

Bit harsh, those isis fighters were probably just nipping out for a bit of shopping or daily exercise from the coved 19 lockdown, typical of over bearing authorities and their overkill( pardon the pun), ah well at lease we saved some coved 19 test kits, well done RAF.

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
5 months ago

Easy to forget the overseas commitments we still have, and the daily flight operations over Syria and Iraq. Could do with a 4 month deployment to Akrotiri 😃🇬🇧

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
5 months ago
Reply to  Robert Blay

I thought they had been withdrawn. How wrong I was.

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
5 months ago

Think we have 8 or 10 Typhoons based at Akrotiri, Voyagers, Reapers, Chinooks, a E3 sentry and RC135 & sentinel R1. Falklands det, chinooks in Africa too, QRA North & South. And thats just the standard ops stuff.

Clayton Boyden
Clayton Boyden
5 months ago
Reply to  Robert Blay

and just the RAF!!

dan
dan
5 months ago

Welcome back to the party!

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
5 months ago

Any further news on UK AESA radars that will be installed on Typhoon?

Saab starts flight testing AESA fighter radar

https://www.janes.com/article/95782/saab-starts-flight-testing-aesa-fighter-radar

Ian
Ian
5 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

With the current situation in aviation , could the RAF pick up some nice low mileage ,one lady owner 737’s to boost our numbers

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
5 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Hi Nigel. Not sure when RAF Typhoons get the new radar, though I understand the one we will be buying will have the electronic attack capabilities, or the CAPTOR E R2 i think its called. Probably down to money, and also that the current Captor radar is still probably as good, if not better then anything currently in service. So i think the RAF aren’t in any particular rush for it.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
5 months ago
Reply to  Robert Blay

Thank you!

Steve R
Steve R
5 months ago

Seeing as Japan has decided against Tempest and Italy’s involvement, whilst they seem keen, being uncertain, I wonder, if Tempest looks unlikely to go ahead, whether we could start trying to evolve Typhoon more. Boeing developed the F-15SE Silent Eagle, a version of the F15E developed for a much lower RCS, made with radar-absorbing materials and able to carry weapons internally. I wonder if the same could be done for Typhoon, should Tempest end up looking likely to be cancelled. Would be better and cheaper to produce them as all-new airframes than try to modify existing ones, but would keep… Read more »

DaveyB
DaveyB
5 months ago
Reply to  Steve R

There’s still a lot of potential in the Typhoon’s current airframe. However, if there was the will and money the aircraft could be significantly enhanced. Phase 1 – Easy Stuff 1. The Captor-E will significantly enhance the mission capability of the aircraft and with the radar 2+ build brings it almost on par with the F35’s APG81. 2. Enhanced Praetorian. Leonardo as the prime developer will develop a new defensive aid system for the aircraft. It also has the ability for being scaled up for offensive jamming. 3. EJ200, the engine has an untapped growth margin of 20%, if used… Read more »

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
4 months ago
Reply to  DaveyB

Interesting post thank you.

As always, plenty of available options out there, but little interest or financial investment from partner nations to incorporate some of these modifications onto our Typhoon fleet.

LERX and thrust vectoring has been available for some time now, and improvements to the airframes RCS is easily achievable too from what you have said.

DaveyB
DaveyB
4 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

It is a shame, but without the partner Nations agreement very little will be done. As seen on the Kuwaiti Typhoons very little has been done over a standard Tranche 3, The main upgrade it has is the Captor-E radar, it has all the same weapons integration software as Project Centurion. I do see both the Italian and RAF Typhoons getting the 2+ version of the radar along with the DAS upgrade. Will we also get the LERX? It’s already been trialed and showed its benefits. It is a minor mode, but needs the flight control software updating to take… Read more »

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
4 months ago
Reply to  DaveyB

“It is a shame, but without the partner Nations agreement very little will be done.” Agreed, which is why we would be far better off selling on the Tranche 1-2 aircraft if possible and purchasing the Boeing F/A-18E/F Super Hornet and EA-18G Growler on the back of Germanys order to fill the gap. https://www.flightglobal.com/boeing-joins-meteor-missile-group/28999.article No doubt a very good deal could be obtained for these and useful for future carrier operations too. Reducing the overall number of F35B’s and Typhoon sales would pay for this comfortably? “Price, however, may be a factor: the Super Hornet may cost around $65 million… Read more »

Steve R
Steve R
4 months ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Sadly you’re right about the lack of interest or financial investment.

Could be something to consider if both Tempest and the Franco/German FCAS falter, however. The Phase 3 design changes that DaveyB mentions could provide a potential alternative should either or both of the Gen 6 platforms not go ahead for whatever reason.

That said, I know that realistically, should Tempest be a flop that we will most likely just buy 150 F35As.

Meirion X
Meirion X
4 months ago
Reply to  Steve R

It is the engine intakes of the F-15E that have got the glaring RCS. Best to design a new aircraft from a clean sheet. Only the tails of the Qatari version of the F-15QE, have been redesigned.

Steve R
Steve R
4 months ago
Reply to  Meirion X

How much does the chin intake of the Typhoon affect RCS? I always thought that that would be one of the big things affecting its radar signature; whole thing is pure right angles.

Meirion X
Meirion X
4 months ago
Reply to  Steve R

You are right, the Typhoon’s chin intake has some extra RCS, but less then the F-15.
But have seen the suggestions by DaveyB to reduce the RCS of the Typhoon, it may help.