The US Air Force and Boeing have reached two agreements to implement a final KC-46A Pegasus Remote Vision System design, known as RVS 2.0, and help “counter COVID-19 impacts on the defence industrial base”.

The two Memorandums of Agreement will be incorporated in the KC-46 contract, say Boeing.

“The first MOA institutes the redesign and retrofit of RVS 2.0 in full compliance with the contract requirements at no additional cost to the government. This agreement addresses deficiencies that hindered safe and effective refueling operations. RVS 2.0 will include 4K color cameras with proper viewing geometry, operator stations with larger screens, a laser ranger for refueling aircraft distance measurement and boom assistance augmented reality.

With the help of scientists and engineers from both enterprises, the Air Force will lead design reviews and approve specifications to drive the partnership toward initial fielding in 2023. The second and separate MOA acknowledges possible impacts of the COVID-19 outbreak on our nation and the defense industrial base, and releases previously withheld contract payments to help ensure successful performance under the program.”

This agreement provides Boeing $882 million of withheld payments for previous non-compliance in 33 KC-46 deliveries.

According to the US Department of Defense:

“This withhold release is in line with Department of the Air Force and Department of Defense policies to maximize cash flow, where prudent, to combat coronavirus impacts on the industry base. Within 120 days, the Air Force and Boeing will conduct an expedited process to determine final specification compliance or non-compliance. The Air Force and Boeing are committed to delivering a fully-operational tanker to the warfighter and ensuring the continued viability of an essential member of the defense industrial base.”

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Sceptical Richard
Sceptical Richard
5 months ago

Should have stuck with the original KC-45 decision. Not only would they have a fully working solution in place by now, but a far more capable one, able to replace not just the KC-135, but the KC-10 as well. Ah well