General Anthony Cotton, Commander of US Strategic Command, recently paid a visit to the United Kingdom to acquaint himself with Britain’s nuclear deterrent capabilities, say the Royal Navy in a news release.

General Cotton, who is based at the Air Force Base in Nebraska and responsible for one of the 11 Unified Commands under the US Department of Defense, was greeted at Her Majesty’s Naval Base (HMNB) Clyde on Friday, January 26.

This base serves as the Royal Navy Submarine Service’s headquarters and is a cornerstone of the UK’s nuclear defence infrastructure.

Prior to his visit to Scotland and HMNB Clyde, General Cotton met with Admiral Sir Tony Radakin, Chief of the Defence Staff, in London. Admiral Radakin highlighted the importance of General Cotton’s visit, stating, “I welcome General Cotton to the United Kingdom to see the extraordinary national endeavour that is underway to ready our nuclear enterprise for the challenges of a more contested world. Russia’s renewed aggression has reinforced the fundamental importance of nuclear deterrence to our collective security.”

Admiral Radakin also praised the enduring nuclear partnership between the two nations, emphasising, “We should be proud of the role the UK-US nuclear partnership has played as a stabilising force in global affairs for the past 65 years. No two other nations in the world are prepared to cooperate so comprehensively over such sovereign and supreme strategic capabilities. With production of both the Dreadnought and Columbia classes of submarine now well underway, the UK-US nuclear partnership will prove just as vital in the decades ahead.”

During his time at HMNB Clyde, General Cotton was welcomed by Director Submarines, Rear Admiral Simon Asquith. His itinerary included a guided tour of the facilities integral to supporting the nuclear enterprise, as well as a visit to one of the Vanguard-class submarines, which have been instrumental in maintaining the UK’s Continuous at Sea Deterrent for nearly 55 years.

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Lisa has a degree in Media & Communication from Glasgow Caledonian University and works with industry news, sifting through press releases in addition to moderating website comments.
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George Amery
George Amery
2 months ago

Hi folks hope all is well.
Good to see.
As a side issue. I read somewhere yesterday that the marines amphibious ships are to be saved? I would have thought UKDJ would be able to qualify this.
Cheers
George

Jonathan
Jonathan
2 months ago
Reply to  George Amery

Yes Foreign Office minister Andrew Mitchell assured MPs in the intelligence security committee when the chair asked that both ships will remain in service until their planned out of service dates in the early 2030s “I am able on behalf of the Government to give him that undertaking that neither of them will be scrapped.” He also confirmed they would remain commissioned and not be mothballed. This was on the 23rd so it seems they have decided announcing they would go would be bad in an election year..when security is starting to become a bit more of a thing than… Read more »

JP
JP
2 months ago
Reply to  Jonathan

The irony is Mitchell (foreign aid minister) and threw a tantrum when UK reduced aid budget from 0.7% to 0.5% of GDP. Perhaps Ukraine/Russia has focussed minds that hard power counts.

Marked
Marked
2 months ago
Reply to  George Amery

Tshirts about frigate building in Scotland took priority that day.

WSM
WSM
2 months ago

No doubt the General’s itinerary included a trip into the ‘burgh and a few swallies in The Imps – ahhh the joys of the off-duty Submariner ⚓

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
2 months ago

Oh shit that’s more information that will be stored in a Trump bathroom for his Russian cleaner to find.

FormerUSAF
FormerUSAF
2 months ago
Reply to  Spyinthesky

🤔, (one possible outcome). Another, although doubtful issue, could be the General ‘measuring the curtains’ for future joint occupancy w/ USN. Would imagine USN is quite interested in additional allied submarine maintenance facilities, given current backlog. Impossible? Perhaps not, given USAF (and predecessor) has been a tenant for at least 80 years. Would recommend a forceful negotiating strategy by your estate agent. At a minimum, Uncle Sugar should bring an open checkbook for infrastructure development, and, oh yeah, GBAD for all. 🤔😳😉

Mark
Mark
2 months ago
Reply to  FormerUSAF

Given the issues that have been highlighted for the RN sub fleet, not sure how the USN might be able to get any dock time?

FormerUSAF
FormerUSAF
2 months ago
Reply to  Mark

Eventually, after the floating docks are delivered and other areas are renovated, there will be surplus space. Perfect opportunity for RN to generate some serious coin of the realm.

Jim
Jim
2 months ago
Reply to  FormerUSAF

Unfortunately also ours are operated by Private companies, primarily Babcock.

FormerUSAF
FormerUSAF
2 months ago
Reply to  Jim

Hmmm .. another perfectly plausible hypothesis, shot in the ass by reality…🤔😳😁

Jim
Jim
2 months ago
Reply to  FormerUSAF

The US is already looking at maintaining surface ships in Japan, the UK is the only country that can assist in maintenance for US SSN’s and SSBN’s. We have our own issues just now regarding dry docks for nuclear boats but it could certainly be the case once the UK facilities are complete and our own back log is sorted that USN boats use the new facilities at Faslane or Devenport. It would probably be one of the major ways the UK could assist the US especially in a conflict with China. The UK still operates a very robust ship… Read more »

FormerUSAF
FormerUSAF
2 months ago
Reply to  Jim

And, presumably, eventually Australia as well…

The consolidation/closure of shipyard maintenance facilities w/in the US, another ‘peace dividend’ resulting from the declaration of victory in Cold War I…🙄

Andrew D
Andrew D
2 months ago
Reply to  FormerUSAF

GBAD would be nice 🤔

Mark F
Mark F
2 months ago

No pun intended George but a change needs to be made !
*Her* Majesty’s Naval Base (HMNB) Clyde on Friday, January 26.

Have a good weekend😉👍

FormerUSAF
FormerUSAF
2 months ago
Reply to  Mark F

Old habits (and stock text descriptions) die hard. 😉

DeeBee
DeeBee
2 months ago

Probably here to tell us that our navy is so tiny it’s not fit for purpose, same for our RAF, same for our tiny excuse of an army, which I’ve stated I here many times, only to be told by many that all is fine, well like I said all along obviously it isn’t, glad I’ve been proved right, keep up folks!!

FormerUSAF
FormerUSAF
2 months ago
Reply to  DeeBee

Unfortunately or otherwise, it does not require many SSBNs to almost literally create a Hell on Earth. It is a task that is well w/in RN’s current and projected capabilities. As an aside, surprised the itinerary did not include a tour of Dreadnought (et al.), construction at Barrow. 🤔

David Barry
David Barry
2 months ago
Reply to  FormerUSAF

Because, you are all over Barrow 😉

FormerUSAF
FormerUSAF
2 months ago
Reply to  David Barry

Excellent pun, benefits from a significant element of truth. 👍😊

Jim
Jim
2 months ago
Reply to  FormerUSAF

It’s worth noting that our SSBN fleet will be 1/3rd the size of the USN fleet. We don’t operate any capability that’s 1/3rd the size of the USA.

As you say it does not take much when it comes to SSBN’s to create hell on earth.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
2 months ago
Reply to  DeeBee

I am sure the General would not be so negative. He is probably aware that our navy is the second most capable in NATO.

geoff
geoff
2 months ago

As a matter of interest, does anyone know what flag is partly obscured by Admiral Radakin in the headline photo? It doesn’t look like the White Ensign.

Ian
Ian
2 months ago

That’ll be ‘His Majesty’s Naval Base’ now. Still getting used to that.