The U.S. National Intelligence Council has released the seventh edition of its quadrennial report ‘Global Trends 2040: A More Contested World’.

The report is an unclassified assessment of the forces and dynamics that the NIC anticipates are likely to shape the national security environment over the next 20 years.

“Global Trends 2040 identifies four structural forces that will shape the future – demographics, the environment, economics, and technology – and assesses how they affect decisions and outcomes. It further describes five potential scenarios for the world in 2040, based on different combinations of the structural forces, emerging dynamics, and key uncertainties. It ends with a series of graphics displaying key demographic trends in nine geographic regions.

The NIC has delivered Global Trends to each incoming or returning U.S. presidential administration since 1997 as an unclassified assessment of the strategic environment, reflecting a broad range of expert opinion in the United States and abroad. The report is intended to help policymakers and citizens anticipate and prepare for a range of possible futures. The NIC supports the Director of National Intelligence in her role as head of the Intelligence Community and is the IC’s center for long-term strategic analysis. Since its establishment in 1979, the NIC has served as a bridge between the intelligence and policy communities, a source of deep substantive expertise on intelligence issues, and a facilitator of IC collaboration and outreach.”

The full report is available here, along with a five-year strategic outlook for each geographic region. It is understood that a wide variety of experts, domestically and internationally, were consulted by the NIC as it conducted its analysis.

The final report represents the views of the NIC, according to the agency.

Let’s get into the report

According to the report, the next 20 years will be more volatile with a heightened risk of conflict, at least until states establish new rules, norms, and boundaries for the more disruptive areas of competition.

It says:

“States will face a combination of highly destructive and precise conventional and strategic weapons, cyber activity targeting civilian and military infrastructure, and a confusing disinformation environment. Regional actors, including spoilers such as Iran and North Korea, will jockey to advance their goals and interests, bringing more volatility and uncertainty to the system.”

As for ‘other major powers’ besides the USA and China, the report says that Russia is ‘likely to remain a disruptive power’; while the UK is ‘likely to continue to punch above its weight internationally given its strong military and financial sector and its global focus.

The report also states that the United Kingdom’s nuclear capabilities and permanent UN Security Council membership add to its global influence.

Managing the economic and political challenges posed by its departure from the EU will be the country’s key challenge; failure could lead to a splintering of the United Kingdom and leave it struggling to maintain its global power.

“The United Kingdom is likely to continue to punch above its weight internationally given its strong military and financial sector and its global focus. The United Kingdom’s nuclear capabilities and permanent UN Security Council membership add to its global influence. Managing the economic and political challenges posed by its departure from the EU will be the country’s key challenge; failure could lead to a splintering of the United Kingdom and leave it struggling to maintain its global power.”

You can read the report here.

George has a degree in Cyber Security from Glasgow Caledonian University and has a keen interest in naval and cyber security matters and has appeared on national radio and television to discuss current events. He also works for the NHS. George is on Twitter at @geoallison
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SteveP
SteveP
1 month ago

At face value we punch above our weight but much of our capabilities are hollow. Two carriers but not enough F35’s available to provide both CAP and a strike capability. The shorter range of the F35b and its lack of air to air refueling, drop tanks and stand off weapons means our carries having to operate close to shore on strike missions and we’ve just seen the threat that shore based SSM’s can pose. UK F35’s have no stand off land attack or anti-ship missiles and even when they get SPEAR its range is a third of Storm Shadow and… Read more »

FOSTERSMAN
FOSTERSMAN
1 month ago
Reply to  SteveP

Spot on

Simon
Simon
1 month ago
Reply to  SteveP

Won’t the Challenger 3 have the Israeli Trophy APS?

Marked
Marked
1 month ago
Reply to  Simon

Supposed to get it. Although not all the fleet will get it. Usual cost cutting BS.

Andy A
Andy A
1 month ago
Reply to  Marked

Not really if the USA and Israel only fit it on units going into combat why would we do otherwise

maurice10
maurice10
1 month ago
Reply to  Andy A

After Russia’s experience with tank losses, there is a strong argument to equip our MBTs plus other vehicles when operating in hostile theaters. This could result in the purchase of more systems?

Dave12
Dave12
1 month ago
Reply to  maurice10

Using Russian tank loses as a example means nothing it just shows the massive loses and total cook off with them is how poorly built and designed Russian tanks are compared to western MBT.

Daveyb
Daveyb
1 month ago
Reply to  Dave12

I agree tactically, but both NLAW and Javelin will kill a Challenger 2!

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
1 month ago
Reply to  Daveyb

Look on the bright side.

At least we are buying some TROPHY so it is a system that is accepted and will be in inventory, spares and training.

Far easier and cheaper to upscale that than to start from scratch.

Likewise we are on a CH3 program so upgrading more is no on the impossible list and it will get cheaper the more are upgraded.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
1 month ago
Reply to  Dave12

…and poorly tactically handled.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
1 month ago
Reply to  maurice10

Would be a big price tag if you fitted APS to all AFVs.

AJP1960
AJP1960
1 month ago
Reply to  maurice10

It would seem that the Russian tank losses are a lot down to design. Shells are carried in a carousel under the turret – to facilitate rapid reloading. It seems that one missile strike can easily set of one round which tends to cook-off the rest – blowing the turret sky high and killing the crew.

In western tanks the rounds are stored in separate locations. Slows the reload slightly but makes the tank more resilient.

Marked
Marked
1 month ago
Reply to  Andy A

Because in combat tanks will be lost and replacements from the reserve brought in! If they won’t be used in combat why bother having them?

Last edited 1 month ago by Marked
David Flandry
David Flandry
1 month ago
Reply to  Andy A

Because you should.

David Flandry
David Flandry
1 month ago
Reply to  Marked

The bean counters at work.

John Francis
John Francis
1 month ago
Reply to  Simon

From what i’ve read, the answer is yes.

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
1 month ago
Reply to  SteveP

Meteor is already in service with Typhoon. And you know more F35s are coming.

Marked
Marked
1 month ago
Reply to  SteveP

Agree 100%. No doubt someone will be along soon to say we don’t need anti ship missiles though as one of the astutes will be in 3 places at once. Or airpower with its nonexistent anti ship weapons will save the day. Or a nato ally will do the job for us despite having their own waters they need to protect as well. Or aliens will intervene on our behalf. Whichever excuse is in fashion for the day.

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
1 month ago
Reply to  Marked

Ao what would you do about it then and how would you pay for it??

Marked
Marked
1 month ago
Reply to  Robert Blay.

The money is there already, it just needs competent people spending it rather than flushing billions down the toilet over the years on failing mismanaged projects.

Rob Young
Rob Young
1 month ago
Reply to  Marked

Money will always be spent in ways that are not exactly efficient. To think otherwise is just wishful thinking. In the real world, such losses need to be reduced, yes, but they also need to be taken into account when planning and funding projects. As I said, we live in the real world, not a fantasy world.

David Barry
David Barry
1 month ago
Reply to  Rob Young

Then change officer promotion and add in procurement management – min 5 years on a project AND your work referenced for a further 5 years on promotion boards. Complete balls up on both CS and Military boards.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
1 month ago
Reply to  David Barry

Military careers are not geared around 5 years in post; it won’t fly. Civil Servants is different.
I agree that all who work at Abbey Wood should have procurement training.

David Barry
David Barry
1 month ago
Reply to  Marked

Bump. Well said.

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
1 month ago
Reply to  Marked

That doesn’t really answer the question does it.

Ian
Ian
1 month ago
Reply to  Marked

Marked….. a mate of mine has got some Hyperdrive units from the Millennium Falcon…. bolt them on the Astutes and Admiral Han Solo can be anything around the world in seconds

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
1 month ago
Reply to  SteveP

There are gaps, there’s no denying it. However, “Punching above our weight” also involves know how, professionalism, training, and most importantly the logistic and intelligence trail to back it all up and actually deploy effectively. All of which mighty Russia has been found wanting despite numbers. It is always a balance, how many nations have lots of shiny kit sitting there unused and with no combat or operational experience but which on paper look good? Meteor has entered service. The loss of Sentinel remains demented in my view despite it supposedly being obsolete and agree with the herc cuts and… Read more »

SteveP
SteveP
1 month ago

Totally agree about the things in your first paragraph. If anything that makes our terrible procurement record even more disappointing as we have brilliant people but give them largely rubbish kit which takes far too long to get into service

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
1 month ago
Reply to  SteveP

“but give them largely rubbish kit” I can’t really agree with that. Most of the rubbish kit has been removed from inventory to make way for way better stuff. “which takes far too long to get into service” That is probably true in some cases. The biggest problems are the massive projects that stall soak £Bn’s and then fail. There are a lot of small scale very good value for money projects that get pushed back because the big projects are sucking cash and seen as vital. There are examples of brilliant procurement but we always focus on the stuff… Read more »

David Barry
David Barry
1 month ago

We should forget the balls up that is Ajax? Astute build (oxymoronic), Nimrod, Warrior upgrade? Glacial T26 build?

No, we need focus and people doing a 2 year stint need to be held to account on their promotion boards 5 years into the future – how many would have gold plated Ajax if they knew it would bite them on the arrse several years later?

Steve R
Steve R
1 month ago
Reply to  David Barry

I’m trying to get into MoD procurement – I actually have an online assessment centre next week for it, which I think is the 2nd to last stage (I hope!).

I keep thinking that if I get in, then if I start on a procurement project I’ll bloody well see it through!

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
1 month ago
Reply to  Steve R

Many complex military procurement projects take 10 years or more.

SteveP
SteveP
1 month ago

I’d describe destroyers and general purpose frigates with no ASW or anti-ship missiles and helicopters with no data link or submarine detection equipment as rubbish kit

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
1 month ago
Reply to  SteveP

The kit is fine and upgradable. Far better than having ancient rubbish in huge number. You could fit hull sonar to T45 very easily. The issue is more having a proper sonar team to operate it all the time. The thing about T45 being noisy is half true. It is very noisy going very very fast which it is very very good at going fast. When it is going along slow it is not so bad. You as you don’t hunt subs at a sprint and can’t listen for them at a sprint the use of the sonar is actually… Read more »

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
1 month ago
Reply to  SteveP

Most procurement projects go very well. You just hear about the big ones that go wrong.

The Artist Formerly Known As Los Pollos Chicken
The Artist Formerly Known As Los Pollos Chicken
1 month ago
Reply to  SteveP

Don’t agree we are and have always been in the top tier and continue to be able to do what nearly everyone else can’t that’s just simple reality based on historical and current fact. Your entire El negative opinion is from what I can see is based on “numbers of assets” the usual shite the haven’t a clue brigade spout every single time anything positive is reported .Not enough tanks not enough ships not having this kind of missile etc etc blah blah blah. Intelligence gathering ,logistical capabilities, communications and training that is light years beyond 99% of the planets… Read more »

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
1 month ago

Well said 👍🇬🇧

Barry Larking
Barry Larking
1 month ago

A grown up has just entered the room.

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker
1 month ago

You get the same in America. People saying the same things like capability gaps, services not got what’s needed etc etc. doesn’t matter how good you are you can always do better. Defence is a had area to measure. So long as you are better trained and use what you have better than your opponents the outcome should be what you want it to be.

Klonkie
Klonkie
1 month ago

It’s probably difficult for most folk to understand the true value of the points you raised, in particular good intel, comms and log. It’s not the sort of discipline that grabs the headlines, but of course you are 100% correct. I’d add RAF UAV ops to your list, both intel gathering strike. It is difficult to strike a balance with force numbers though. I genuinely don’t know what the optimum force number should look like, however there is no denying the waining number since the 2003/4 cuts. I do believe the UK armed forces have much to be proud of… Read more »

The Artist Formerly Known As Los Pollos Chicken
The Artist Formerly Known As Los Pollos Chicken
1 month ago
Reply to  Klonkie

Aye totally agree with your point on cuts and RAF UAV ops .I don’t get notification to any replies on here and due to being on the “list” hardly ever get any of my bloviations through the moderator probs something to do with my opinions? and difficulty in sticking to strict civility guidelines 😂

HM armed forces NUMERO UNO 👍🏻

🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿🇬🇧

Jonathan
Jonathan
1 month ago
Reply to  SteveP

That is a wholly negative out look, with some pretty black a s white statements. what do we have, probably the best combination of ASW surface and rotor asset in the world. OK it would be nice that our AAW destroyers had some organic ASW but then if it needs it you pair it with a Merlin. As for AAW we have the most advanced AAW asset in the world, I yes you may give the but it’s got less missiles….that’s fine but it’s going to kill more with the missiles it has than most other AAW platforms on the… Read more »

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
1 month ago
Reply to  Jonathan

Bravo J.

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
1 month ago
Reply to  Jonathan

Well said mate. You said everything I couldn’t be bothered to say for the 500th time in the UKDJ comments section. 😄👍

SteveP
SteveP
1 month ago
Reply to  Jonathan

With respect to your point above Western navies never using SSM”s, US warships fired Harpoon during operation Praying Mantis and in confrontations with Libya in the Gulf of Sirte. But in any event will you be arguing that we should abolish nuclear missiles because no one has fired one? And you’re right; warships will seek to stay away from other warships and not close to engage with SSM’s.The whole point of SSM’s is to establish a sterile zone around your ship that hostile vessels will stay out of. However, ships don’t need to hide from ships with short ranged offensive… Read more »

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
1 month ago
Reply to  SteveP

We use helicopters to sink vessels in the littoral. SSN’s to sink larger vessels. Escorts equipped with Anti ship missiles as back up. Other Navy’s don’t have that array of capability. You want to sink warships, you use the best tool for the job. A Nuclear sub. And the West has a hugely capable hunter killer submarine fleet. 1 or 2 Astutes could cause havoc with overwhelming capabilities.

Jonathan
Jonathan
1 month ago
Reply to  Robert Blay.

Yes I don’t think people realise the impact of one SSN used in anger against a navy that is not equipped to handle it ( and I suspect only the RN, USN and maybe the Royale could have a chance of managing to keep an Asute evading to prevent it sinking a lot of ships). Also I think the strategic mobility of an SSN is generally underestimated, a boat that can travel 600+ NM every day without concern for fuel, that’s crossing the Pacific in 20 days or Atlantic in 4 days. This also means even if we only have… Read more »

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
1 month ago
Reply to  Jonathan

Couldn’t agree more mate 👍. Sorry I didn’t reply to you a few days back about UK Shipbuilding. You had made some very valid points that I didn’t consider at the time of my original post.

SteveP
SteveP
1 month ago
Reply to  Robert Blay.

Other navies do have that array of capabilities. France, China, Russia, India and the US have SSN’s and carriers and all of them fit escort ships with heavyweight SSM’s.

Steve R
Steve R
1 month ago
Reply to  SteveP

Russia’s shown what a massive offensive armament but little focus on defence can achieve; just look at the Moskva!

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
1 month ago
Reply to  Steve R

It all has to be:-

a) integrated; and

b) work.

Otherwise all you have is a floating junk yard. Or a large handy target…..who said that eh?

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
1 month ago
Reply to  SteveP

And all but two are allies. That’s why we work together, and practice interoperability relentlessly.

Jonathan
Jonathan
1 month ago
Reply to  SteveP

Steve you are forgetting the kill chain, ships at war do not blast out across the EM spectrum, which means you can or see them and they can’t see you. Every warship has to hide if it does not it’s dead. The enemy will know where it is and co-ordinate the assets to overwhelm and kill it. This means there is no sterile Zone around a warship beyond a very limited range, even if a ship went active with a very high mounted radar against a very large target the radar horizon is no more 20nm. In an active war… Read more »

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
1 month ago
Reply to  Jonathan

It’s interesting reading about how the Moskva was targeted. They didn’t know where it was until it’s general position was revealed by publicly available satellite imagery revealed its persistence in that general location, they then sent out a drone to search that area giving more precise targeting information and act as a distraction, the two missiles were then aimed at that spot the ship would have had about 10 seconds to respond once detected and the rest is history.

Posse Comitatus
Posse Comitatus
1 month ago
Reply to  Jonathan

Very true. There is of course a need for anti surface missiles on RN ships, but mainly for land attack roles, anti shipping being secondary. I honestly cannot find one wartime example of a modern warship detecting, tracking, gaining a firing solution , launching missiles and striking a peer enemy warship, and not be attacked itself.

The only examples I have are by SSN.

Tommo
Tommo
1 month ago

HmS Conqueror 2nd May 82 Silent service proud wearer of the Skull and cross bones pennant when returning to GUZZ

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
1 month ago
Reply to  Tommo

It had to be done.

Not nice but it had to be done it was war and the Argentinians started it by invading.

Belgrano was a major threat with its escorts and that was acknowledged by surviving officers.

Indeed it was tasked as part of an attack plan contrary to the rubbish that one J Corbyn kept spouting.

Jonathan
Jonathan
1 month ago

Yes the of the Captain of the Belgrano was very clear the ship was a valid military target and they were moving to engage. What was really interesting was the threat assessment, the Captain of the belgrano saw his ship as a lower level threat, but the RN from the interviews I have watched and read were actually quite concerned what a 6in gun, cruiser with 5-6 in armoured belts would do to RN frigates and destroyers who would have no answer if it got within engagement range ( exorcet would struggle to do much against 5.5 inch armoured belts,… Read more »

Last edited 1 month ago by Jonathan
Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
1 month ago
Reply to  Jonathan

Again. Spot on mate. Folks don’t understand the kill chain process. All this talk of taking out warships from hundreds of miles away with vessel launched ASM’S is nonsense in real world Naval warfare. If the cash was available, I’d rather put TLAM on our escorts.

David Anwyl-Hughes
David Anwyl-Hughes
1 month ago
Reply to  Jonathan

Well said Jonathan.

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
1 month ago
Reply to  Jonathan

Clear and logical.

Nicely put.

Sean
Sean
1 month ago
Reply to  Jonathan

Excellent balanced and logical reply 👍🏻

Klonkie
Klonkie
1 month ago
Reply to  Jonathan

Jonathan, really good insights, thank you. I’m particularly liking your points 1 and 6. And that’s not to suggest I don’t support the other 4 points you raised.

Andrew D
Andrew D
1 month ago
Reply to  SteveP

Very well said we have war in Europe and lacking with some of our warfare systems ,we have kit with only half of it’s potential because of lack of investment .Plus we keep on cutting what does it take for HMG to wake up ☕

Martin
Martin
1 month ago
Reply to  SteveP

True but much of that’s relatively easy to fix with modest budget increases. Structurally the forces are in the best place they have been for years.I do agree on SSN, we could easily double production.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
1 month ago
Reply to  Martin

The army is in the worse shape it has been for years. Very small troop numbers, with nearly all AFVs being old and mostly unmodernised, very little artillery, significant capability gaps.

Peter tattersll
Peter tattersll
1 month ago
Reply to  SteveP

More F35 arriving….. News for you F35 don’t just come off the belt like a family car. We could go for cheap nasty easy to obtain Russian quality crap no thanks rather wait for high end .

Sean
Sean
1 month ago

I hear two Russian aircraft fell out of the sky on the first day of the war due to the poor quality of maintenance. Some people still seem be seduced by raw numbers but fail to appreciate that quality is a force-multiplier.

Tommo
Tommo
1 month ago
Reply to  Sean

I don’t know if it’s still happening, but in the days of the Soviet Union, Apparently the ground crews would often drink the Anti freeze meant for the Aircraft then again it could be an Urbanski myth Sean

JohninMK
JohninMK
1 month ago
Reply to  Sean

An Su-34 ‘fell out if the sky’ yesterday near Kharkov, No hostile impact it just fell round and round like a leaf. Destroyed on impact. Engine failure likely. The crew ejected and were SAR helicopter’d.

Airborne
Airborne
1 month ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Because the ground crew are shite, the aircrew are half trained and the kit they use is actually quite shite as well! You choose which most suits or a combination of the three!

Daveyb
Daveyb
1 month ago
Reply to  SteveP

What if Meteor could do some of the anti-radiation role?

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
1 month ago
Reply to  Daveyb

Anything with a radar in the front of it can go passive and do anti radiation with a bit of help from mother.

Rob N
Rob N
1 month ago
Reply to  SteveP

I think you have not quite grasped the fact that this assessment covers the future not the present. You are tight we do have current capability gaps but these are not pertinent. We will get more F35s, and Tempest. We will get new strike missiles and ABM capable ships. We will get new SSN/SSBNs. Also there is much work being done on autonomous land/sea/air systems that will give extra capability. Given the new focus on defence post the Russian invasion of Ukraine it would not shock me to see a higher priority for defence funding. Defence is changing given new… Read more »

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
1 month ago
Reply to  Rob N

Very well explained 👍

Something Different
Something Different
1 month ago
Reply to  SteveP

I thought the reason for the carriers’ perceived lack of aircraft was because they their full operating capability won’t be reached until 2023.

James
James
1 month ago

Numerous reasons exist but people just love to bang the ‘aircraft carriers with no aircraft’ drum and ignore the facts they get told every single time they bring it up. Typical copy and past trolling sadly.

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
1 month ago

Ssssshhhh…..why spoil their rant with the most basic of ascertainable facts like when it is planned to be fully operational…..I mean goodness you will shortly point out that warships are built in Scotland or something else that is factually true?

Moral: never er facts get in the way of a good winge!

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
1 month ago
Reply to  SteveP

A good, succinct summary but I would add that the attack submarine issue is primarily that 7 boats is not enough by far – we should perhaps have a SSN/SSK mix of well over a dozen boats. I had not heard that CR3 will be poorer than other designs entering service at the same time – I hear that 60 APS will be fitted across the 148-strong fleet – that shortfall could be quickly remedied. 148 tanks allows for just two Type 56 armoured regiments – way too few, as you say. The army has so many other equipment problems… Read more »

Stc
Stc
1 month ago
Reply to  SteveP

Yes, not good 2% of GDP is under punching our weight. Putin 2 years time starts on us and the US is as slow as it’s leader to respond, history shows it often is, we are stuffed. Anyone including, some have served, do not appear to understand the Russians, we would be extremely unwise to assume that Putin is the only problem. If they did they would doing something similar to Germany. I would not freeze Russian assets I would seize them and spend it on the arm forces. You can do it to striking Trade Unions why not Russia.… Read more »

UK Voter
UK Voter
1 month ago
Reply to  SteveP

F35b has air to air refuelling!

SteveP
SteveP
1 month ago
Reply to  UK Voter

It does but we have no carrier based assets to refuel it

Steve R
Steve R
1 month ago
Reply to  SteveP

Yet.

Steve
Steve
1 month ago
Reply to  SteveP

The punch above own weight was linked to our perm membership of the secruity council and nukes. They didn’t link it to actual military power.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
1 month ago
Reply to  Steve

That actual military power is the enablers that I outline rather than numbers which we lack. You could have 1000 tanks and 400 fast jets with no combat experience, tactics, or logistical back up to use them.

Steve
Steve
1 month ago

Yeah just highlighting what the report stated rather than how people are reacting to it. Sooner or later we will lose our perm seat on the UN, at which point it will be interesting to see how the US consider us.

Steve R
Steve R
1 month ago
Reply to  Steve

Russia’s far more likely to lose their permanent seat than we are.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
1 month ago
Reply to  Steve R

Why? USSR was a WW2 victor and Russia has inherited that.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
1 month ago
Reply to  Steve

Perm seats were allocated to the WW2 victors – no-one can take that away from us.

JohninMK
JohninMK
1 month ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Only possibility is if Scotland gains independence, then we could.

Airborne
Airborne
1 month ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Any condemnation yet of Putins illegal invasion of Ukraine? Come on troll have some balls to answer that one simple question!

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
1 month ago
Reply to  JohninMK

No. USSR seat was transferred to the Russian Federation, as I am sure you must know – a far bigger change to a country. The loss of less than 10% of our population would not warrant loss of the P5 seat.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
1 month ago
Reply to  SteveP

Could not agree more, plus the lack of Marte ER for Typhoon’s short term as they are all ready to be integrated.

Nicholas Bassett
Nicholas Bassett
1 month ago
Reply to  SteveP

Sadly true, Steve.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
1 month ago

As a P5, G7 member, and one of the world’s biggest economies, as well as a world financial centre, so I should think!

John Clark
John Clark
1 month ago

Here, here, Daniele, very well said….

The UK has the ability to project power and sustain it, it’s a rare capability, most other nations simply don’t possess.

I honestly think it would be the same with China too, if they attempted to invade Taiwan, they would be thrown back in disarray.

Ukraine shows us clearly that these huge lumbering inflexible military machines, with their fixed top down command structures just simply don’t work.

They actually fall flat on their arse when they hit determined resistance….

Tommo
Tommo
1 month ago
Reply to  John Clark

For a small country we might be punching above our weight but we’ve still got the reach

Sean
Sean
1 month ago
Reply to  John Clark

The nature of all totalitarian regimes, such as Putin’s kleptocracy, or China’s Communist Party, is they their authoritarianism demands strict top-down command structures with little initiative for troops and commanders on the ground. As such, they are all doomed to have inflexible, unimaginative, and inefficient militaries.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
1 month ago
Reply to  John Clark

UK can project power to any corner of the globe. Russia and China have shown no similar ability – they are regional, not global players.

Sean
Sean
1 month ago

You forgot to add the 11th largest exporter of manufactured goods by value, and only second to the USA in number of science Nobel prizes win. 😉

Tommo
Tommo
1 month ago
Reply to  Sean

And a quarter of the Population to the USA

Steve
Steve
1 month ago
Reply to  Tommo

Quarter of the population but a tenth of the GDP. Can’t really compare population as natural resources/land mass etc come into play.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
1 month ago
Reply to  Sean

I left out lots, as I’ve gone on off on rants like this before when there is an anti UK troll in the room, but could not be bothered. Lets add soft power, self proclaimed nuclear power, top universities, a test pilot school in the ETPS which sits next to the USAF, USN, and French equivalents at the top table of that, the English language, which underpins science and ATC around the world and legacy of empire which remains to this day, and diplomatic, cultural, and military alliances and ties around the world. We also have assets in the SF,… Read more »

David Barry
David Barry
1 month ago

Who is the troll?

Jason
Jason
1 month ago

How is this affected by France and Germany still supplying weapons to Russia during the Ukraine invasion ?

Watcherzero
Watcherzero
1 month ago
Reply to  Jason

They havent supplied them since the invasion, theyve continued to deliver on contracts for small arms signed before the 2014 arms embargo after the embargo was implemented on the argument that they would be used for police.

Last edited 1 month ago by Watcherzero
Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker
1 month ago
Reply to  Watcherzero

Germany has supplied a lot of equipment but they often don’t make a big song and dance about it unlike most. I think Ukraine has loads of equipment now. Main thing going forward is keeping the supplies going. Everyone is really quick to judge the Germans but they have a lot of laws and procedures about supplying weapons, getting involved in conflicts etc. they also have the big issue that the need Russian gas and if that was cut off they would be in a bad situation with industry, residential, economic. Steps are being taken to stop taking so much… Read more »

JohninMK
JohninMK
1 month ago
Reply to  Monkey spanker

With 52 odd nuclear power stations France doesn’t use gas in such a high proportion of its total energy consumption as us.

Jack K
Jack K
1 month ago

‘Punching above it’s weight’ seems a little condescedning as we spend spend more than most of the world in defence. There’s only a few countries on the planet that out spend us. I’d also argue we’re above most/all other countries when it comes to expertise.

Mac
Mac
1 month ago
Reply to  Jack K

Its a lazy, meaningless phrase.

If this war in Ukraine has proved anything, absolute size is an irrelevant metric for measuring a country and its power.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
1 month ago
Reply to  Mac

Mac, I don’t think anyone would consider that we had large armed forces for the size of our Defence spend.

David
David
1 month ago
Reply to  Mac

My brother in law was an officer in the Spanish Air Force. At the time of the Falklands war he got into many arguments with my father (ex RN) and mother (ex WAAF) about the war. Basically, he was arguing that Argentina was a geographically large country and would therefore win. My father pointed out that the relative sizes of the defence budgets was rather more relevant. History provided the answer.

Jonathan
Jonathan
1 month ago
Reply to  Jack K

I would suggest is able to knife their opponents in the right place using the right tool is a far more apt description.

Tommo
Tommo
1 month ago
Reply to  Jack K

And you can fit our population in Texas with room just saying …………I’ll get my coat what one means is we are a small country yet vast territories such a US, CCCP sorry Russia ,and China have extremely large populations as well we might be a small fish in a big Pond but my god we’ve got teeth ……. ill get my coat

ExcalibursTemplar
ExcalibursTemplar
1 month ago
Reply to  Tommo

👍

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
1 month ago
Reply to  Tommo

When dear old JC was leader of the opposition I saw him on TV describe the UK as a small nation, he seemed to be only thinking about size in area and typically just had to ignore the rest. It probably pained him.

That his ilk are still just under the surface in the Commons and amongst the Young Labour and Labour party membership is terrifying. Everyone forgets it when looking at the supposedly respectable K Starmer.

David Barry
David Barry
1 month ago

You’re better than that post.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
1 month ago
Reply to  David Barry

Morning David. Maybe then you too are better than that answer! Have you looked at Young Labour’s Twitter feed on their stance on NATO? And why the LP membership oppose AUKUS? Just because you’re a Labour man, which I respect, does not mean I won’t point out elephants in the room just like you do with your attacks on the PM, who despite his many faults, such as being a human being who evaded covid rules like millions and then tries to move on from it, does not oppose either. As for my comment on Corbyn, sorry, but it tallies… Read more »

Airborne
Airborne
1 month ago

Agreed, spot on. The current Labour Party has changed little from when Corbyn was trying to be dear leader! They still have the momentum movement working feverishly behind the scenes, you have a front bench full of third raters and MPs, who if you bother to read their twitter feed, are shockingly out of touch with both UK and overseas thinking.

David Barry
David Barry
1 month ago

Morning Daniele, I no longer get email notification about posts. Sorry for late reply.

True, I can’t answer for others, other than feel disappointed at their stance.

I think we can both agree to disagree on our current Leadership, correct?

I hope we can agree to agree in wishing the best for UK Armed Forces, agreed?

Tommo
Tommo
1 month ago

And Sir Kier is hardly working class But then again our little country has a World class Education system Corbyn failed his 11+ by the sound of it

David Barry
David Barry
1 month ago
Reply to  Tommo

Working class boy made good, I would suggest Tommo.

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker
1 month ago

On defence matters the parties are almost the same. Do more with less. That’s ok to a point and the tech makes a massive difference. I would rather have 150 typhoons and f-35b than 500 jaguars, f-4 phantoms and harriers. Going forward there needs to a good look at how to stop the expensive kit getting destroyed by cheaper weapons. The U.K. direction of travel with anti ship missiles seems good. Multiple smaller missiles will be harder to counter than a big one. Still don’t know if the future anti ship missile uses the 2 extra penetrators as shown of… Read more »

Esteban
Esteban
1 month ago
Reply to  Tommo

What the hell did that post mean.? The UK has teeth because someone else gave them to them
Nuclear submarines , The technology to run the submarines with the reactor which evidently the UK managed not get right. The Trident missiles… And then the warheads that the UK no longer has the ability to design.

Airborne
Airborne
1 month ago
Reply to  Esteban

God you do get boring with your anti UK rants. What’s up, did a Brit squaddie first bang your missus, then bang you out? It’s quite sad you feel the need to be so negative on all your posts. Do you need a cry and a cuddle?

Tommo
Tommo
1 month ago
Reply to  Airborne

👍👍 couldn’t find an emogy for banging your missus so thumbs up Airbourne

Airborne
Airborne
1 month ago
Reply to  Tommo

🤣🥸

David Barry
David Barry
1 month ago
Reply to  Airborne

Laughing my bollocks off at the moment – what a cracking start to the day!

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
1 month ago
Reply to  Esteban

And then the warheads that the UK no longer has the ability to design.”

Intriguing? Since when was that? Despite co operation with LANL which goes back to the dawn of the nuclear age when have we not been able to design, produce and modify, maintain the nuclear stockpile?

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
1 month ago

Daniele, we designed Polaris and Chevaline nuclear warheads but have chosen to use US-designed warheads on Trident – no idea why. Think we build the warheads though.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
1 month ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Exactly. We choose to, not that we cannot. We build our own warheads at AWE Aldermaston and assemble them at Burghfield.

eclipse
eclipse
1 month ago
Reply to  Jack K

The phrase is ridiculous and only exists because the UK is supposedly geographically small. Even when people thought Russia had a formidable, number 2 in the world military, no one said it “punches above its weight” even though their economy is less than half ours! We spend more than any other non-superpower country so I agree, solely our spending should warrant us to be the most powerful non-superpower military. In addition, expertise, technology, training, and countless high-level positions in multinational organisations should mean that we are able to punch hard.

ChariotRider
ChariotRider
1 month ago

Whilst I often find these US appraisals of our military capabilities a bit of a morale boost I would say that if there is a country punching above it’s weight right now it is:

Ukraine.

They are smaller than the UK with a smaller economy and they lack most of the high end kit we have and yet they have trained hard and learnt from their mistakes, taken advice and are now showing the world that small countries can stand up to a bully.

Now that really is punching above your weight.

CR

ExcalibursTemplar
ExcalibursTemplar
1 month ago
Reply to  ChariotRider

👍

Sean
Sean
1 month ago
Reply to  ChariotRider

👍🏻

David Barry
David Barry
1 month ago
Reply to  ChariotRider

Very thoughtful. Thxs.

David Cottle
David Cottle
1 month ago

Another reminder that the loss of influence likely to accompany the splintering of the United Kingdom would badly affect everyone living in it. There’s a huge difference between being a global power and not. No one in Britain can remember ‘not.’ And it shows.

David
David
1 month ago
Reply to  David Cottle

Well picked up. No one else seems to have picked up the more political elements. And they are a big risk area.

Tommo
Tommo
1 month ago
Reply to  David

That’s a good point ,if the Scots were too get their independence Big IF , then unfortunately us English wouldn’t be able too do anything as we’ve given all our Lethal aid to Ukraine it would be back too Shire weavers, Peel towers and Cattle russling, arrrgh the Good ol Days

Knight7572
Knight7572
1 month ago

Yeah, Ajax is a disaster so frankly can it and get CV90 as it would be in service quicker

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
1 month ago
Reply to  Knight7572

I am sure you mean the recce variant of CV90 similar to that supplied to Norway.

Martin
Martin
1 month ago

Nice that the cousins think so highly of us. I wonder if they use the same analysis to look at themselves. Their political system is increasingly erratic, isolationist and their democratic process is under severe threat. Should be very worrying for the UK and the west that it’s key ally exhibits such tendencies.

ExcalibursTemplar
ExcalibursTemplar
1 month ago
Reply to  Martin

That’s why i’m a big proponent of CANZUK. If we join up with the Aussies, Kiwi and Canucks we at least have something very tangible to fall back on. We just need a bigger navy 🙂

Ron Stateside
Ron Stateside
1 month ago

Speaking of Australia, if the Watergate incident happened today it would not be covered by Murdoch’s Fox News nor would it be a story on their website. This is what is happening today as Jan 6 investigations uncover evidence of an attempted coup in the United States. The plethora of media, social and otherwise, is the biggest threat the west has.

ExcalibursTemplar
ExcalibursTemplar
1 month ago
Reply to  Ron Stateside

From an outsider looking in mate it looks to me like it goes both ways. Your politicians on both sides really need to calm down with the rhetoric. The occasional argy bargy is fine. They need to remember though that they have to work together to run your country. There needs to be polite political discourse at times just for the sake of it.

If they carry on the way they are going though the future does not look good for the USA. That’s the last thing the world needs. We’ve got literal Chinese Nazi (Han supremacist) to worry about.

Dave12
Dave12
1 month ago
Reply to  Ron Stateside

Spot on that’s my concern trumpski supporter ‘s is Putin’s biggest achievement.

DanielMorgan
DanielMorgan
1 month ago
Reply to  Ron Stateside

If you really believe that the January 6th demonstrations were an attempted coup than you don’t have the foggiest idea if what a coup attempt is.

Matt
Matt
1 month ago
Reply to  DanielMorgan

I think when an armed mob of 2000 people invades a Parliament building with the declared aim of overthrowing the Government, and 5 people die, “attempted coup” is a reasonable description. Even if the mob is a collection of sawdust-brained dickheads with guns and pipe bombs.

I guess “insurrection” is equally applicable.

Citizen
Citizen
1 month ago
Reply to  Matt

“Armed”, haha. Remember these are the “gun-toting rednecks” you’re talking about. If they had been “armed” with the intent to overthrow the government, they would have brought guns.

Frank62
Frank62
1 month ago

Bigger(big enough to manage all our needs & commitments) & fully equipped(rather than missing essential kit). With so few escorts all should be ASW & AA capable, with decent AShMs & with embarked helicopters that can do both ASW & anti surface, not either or. We need to urgently wake up to the fact we need to be ready for a war footing within 5 years max rather than carrying on in basket-case mode. I’ve never felt our democracies or freedoms as jeopardised & fragile as in the recent few years. We’re tolerating a far too low standard of leadership… Read more »

David
David
1 month ago
Reply to  Martin

And ours is not?

Mark
Mark
1 month ago

Well it looks like we’re having a right clear out of the closest. And finally giving Ukraine what it’s being begging for. But how soon will all the kit were sending over can be replaced. https://www.armyrecognition.com/

Tommo
Tommo
1 month ago
Reply to  Mark

As soon as us Brits stop working from Home

Jonathan
Jonathan
1 month ago
Reply to  Tommo

My work place has clocked on to the fact it gets more from us not being in the office ( we tend to all work in the evening as well now) as well as saving money on office space). Also meetings generally we had to wiz around a county having meetings before so you had to have 30min to an hour between meetings…now they can back to back them without even a wee break.

Tommo
Tommo
1 month ago
Reply to  Jonathan

It was only a joke , but then again I doubt if your missus would like Welding cutting equipment furnaces hammerpresses in your frontroom Johnathan

Jonathan
Jonathan
1 month ago
Reply to  Tommo

Lol, she may just prefer that she’s a very practical lady my wife, not only is she a nurse but she’s a fully qualified car mechanic as well….although she did get a bit upset a couple of years go when I took over the entire dining room and turned it into a major incident control centre for a county to manage a snow event response over a long weekend ( we could not get to the main ICC due to….. umm well snow).

Last edited 1 month ago by Jonathan
Tommo
Tommo
1 month ago
Reply to  Jonathan

Well hopefully with Gretna’s predictions Snow events will be a thing of the past Dining rm saved

Tommo
Tommo
1 month ago
Reply to  Tommo

GRETA not Gretna bloody predictive txt

Jonathan
Jonathan
1 month ago
Reply to  Tommo

i do fancy a nice bit of.warmer winters, will save on the heating bills and everything.

Sean
Sean
1 month ago
Reply to  Tommo

Productivity working from home is higher, plus employers can cut on ridiculously overpriced rented office space. I’d resign in a heartbeat and go elsewhere if my employer ended work from home, and we’re finding when recruiting that WFH is a requirement from all candidates.

Tommo
Tommo
1 month ago
Reply to  Sean

I only posted it as a joke ,Sean, I doubt working from home includes welding cutting furnaces ironwork

Val
Val
1 month ago

I hope it is now clear that punching above our GDP percentage is dangerous. A normal 3 to 4 percent which is still lower than USA, should be the minimal we and our Country deserves. This should not have been a wake up call, but the current World side wars and issues should strike home now. Even with lazy left wing who should be sacked, civil servants!

ExcalibursTemplar
ExcalibursTemplar
1 month ago
Reply to  Val

👍

James
James
1 month ago
Reply to  Val

Dont disagree with the 3-4% idea however unless we scrap the NHS (as the USA doesnt have this burden) it aint going to happen.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
1 month ago
Reply to  James

How did we spend 3-4% on GDP (and more) during the Cold War? We still had the NHS then.

Frank62
Frank62
1 month ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

We taxed more fairly then. Nowdays we hemorage wealth to offshore havens & let the biggest potential taxpayers off scot free or with mates rates. We certainly don’t have talented people anywhere near the top of our political leadership. It seems all about selfish exploitation rather than public service.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
1 month ago
Reply to  Frank62

OK. Tax policy can change then. I’ll just phone up Rishi.

Tommo
Tommo
1 month ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

I’m not xenophobic but we did have a smaller population up until 1991 I’ll get my coat Graham

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
1 month ago
Reply to  Tommo

Thanks Tommo. A bigger population increases the number of patients the NHS has to treat, but it means there are more taxpayers too to contribute to the public coffers.

Tommo
Tommo
1 month ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Only if you don’t have Non domicile tax arrangements ……. I’ll get my Coat

Jonathan
Jonathan
1 month ago
Reply to  James

Actually James the US government tax spend on healthcare per person is more than the NHS and then they pay the same again in private costs. It’s an illusion that the US government does not pay for healthcare, they pay more per person than we do.

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker
1 month ago
Reply to  Jonathan

Exactly. The USA is one of the highest spenders on healthcare per population. Private healthcare can have a place but not instead of universal healthcare for all.
What happens is the USA is some people won’t go and see a doctor for an issue they have. Then sometime later it costs loads more to treat than it would of done had the patient been seen earlier. Among a host of other issues

Jonathan
Jonathan
1 month ago
Reply to  Monkey spanker

Also healthcare Professionals get payed stupid money in the states compared to the U.K. after all if costs are dictated by the market and if you need healthcare it’s pay the money or die…. So a the last study I read on wage comparisons ( a few years ago now) a U.K. consultant surgeons average wage was around £300-400K ( about £100k for NHS work and £200k is private work). Your America Equivalent Consultant surgeon would be on about 4 million dollars. Its the same in other Health professions, so a relatively senior nurse like me ( matron level) is… Read more »

Daveyb
Daveyb
1 month ago

Reading between the lines, the Baltic states and Poland in particular are really unhappy with the EU and its stance with Russia. Both Estonia and Poland have been talking about closer ties to the UK. They are seriously unhappy with the recent piece meal efforts and dragging of heels by both Germany and France in supporting Ukraine. The UK on the other hand has been at the forefront of pushing for more and delivering both support and military aid. But then we didn’t back ourselves in a corner with an over-reliance of Russian gas, or have billions of pounds worth… Read more »

Tommo
Tommo
1 month ago
Reply to  Daveyb

And all the Liberal leaning do gooders think Brexit was so wrong But if we had remained in the EU our hands would have been tied with what we could have done for the Ukraine Nuff said

David
David
1 month ago
Reply to  Tommo

No, that is a brexiter fallacy. Just compare the different extremes of support for Ukraine, from near zero in the case of Hungary to far higher in the case of Poland or the baltics.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
1 month ago
Reply to  David

This country, now out of the EU, was the first to contribute lethal aid, has probably committed more support and funding than any other European nation and has supplied more missiles than the US.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
1 month ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Indeed, but David’s point is correct, and I’m a Brexiteer. In or out of the EU if the UK wanted to do more than other states it would have. There were no shackles there.

JohninMK
JohninMK
1 month ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

And over a much longer time period.

Airborne
Airborne
1 month ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Here we go, the de-escalation efforts with your comments, post a number of routine comments, try to draw in posters with this “reasonable” facade prior to getting back to your Putin Nazi justification posts of an illegal invasion of a sovereign country, namely Ukraine. Troll need to put more effort in!

Matt
Matt
1 month ago
Reply to  David

Not so. There are any number of ‘custom and practice’ type restrictions that operate in the EU beyond the formal law. And would have kicked in on many questions had we stayed members. Consider for example those 4 countries that tried to get a vaccine procurement rolling quickly in spring 2020 – the INclusive Vaccine Alliance, and how they were forced back into line by EuCo, and publicly humiliated. Here is the letter that the Health Ministers were forced to write to the EU Commissioner. It reads like something that might have come from the wotsit of Zanzibar to Queen… Read more »

eu-vaccine-health-minister-letter-1.jpg
Matt
Matt
1 month ago
Reply to  Matt

Page 2 of letter:

(Published in the German Press at the time).

The delay cost 10s of k of EU Citizens their lives, and has its root in Brussels deciding that they could basically meet their need by *buying* vaccines rather than actually developing / making them.

Being Brussels and rather self-obsessed with image, I am not aware that they have any serious chance from their mistakes.

eu-vaccine-health-minister-letter-2.jpg
Last edited 1 month ago by Matt
Tommo
Tommo
1 month ago
Reply to  Matt

Cheers Matt I feel redeemed for my last comment

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
1 month ago
Reply to  Daveyb

Poland is on a very odd political course in terms of its legal institutions. It may well be effectively forced out of the EU by that alone. But may wish to exit due to Germany and Franc’s self interested approach to security and undermining NATO.

If anything has killed the EU Army idea this has.

Everyone now knows that an EU army would never be ordered into battle if it didn’t suit Germany’s ecomimc interest and the French leaders vanity. As those thing never line up nothing would ever happen.

Jonathan
Jonathan
1 month ago

Completely agree, it’s such a shame as the European common market was a great idea and made this county a ton of wealth. But the whole level of European integration that we are seeing discussed now is not great. I do think there will be a kick back at some point as we have seen in the U.K. In the end I think we will have to see the western liberal democracies form some kind of common protected market, as our industrial/tec base is being slowly destroyed by Chinese and other nations mercantile strategy, which we cannot compete against (… Read more »

David Barry
David Barry
1 month ago
Reply to  Jonathan

Except, many countries accepted that thought and in doing so almost loved the UK as being a leader on these issues, inside the EU, then we threw the EU out with the bathwater.

Say hi to so many issues that our ‘free’ Press will not discuss or air on screen.

And I presume you don’t need me to recount them to you.

We were well placed to change the EU.

Jonathan
Jonathan
1 month ago
Reply to  David Barry

Hi Barry, personally I was willing to give the EU some more time and see us work from the inside. But the problem is we had a binary choice leave now or stay in for the long hall. Although I saw a lot of benefits to EU membership ( trade mainly) I had growing concerns about the level of integration that was being considered and I did not like the level of power in the council of ministers and other bodies that were not directly responsible to an electorate. So although I voted remain, it was a remain vote that… Read more »

Tommo
Tommo
1 month ago
Reply to  Jonathan

The EEC ,at least we got too Vote on whether to join or not ,Democracy in action The EU we didn’t even get a chance to Vote Democracy?

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
1 month ago
Reply to  Tommo

Yes, reminds me of the famous “final say” by the remoaners. There was never a final say regards the EEC and no say as the EEC morphed into something many did not want.

So no, no final says now.

The irony with what is going on in Parliament now, regards the PM ruining democracy as the Lib Dem leader said the other day, lets remember what happened between 2016 and 2019 from those democracy loving MPs on all sides blocking, stalling, and delaying everything that moves.

The irony is delicious!!!!

Tommo
Tommo
1 month ago

Democracy is a strange allusion, when One talks of Democracy, and then completely Ignore it Labour and the Liberal Undemocratic Party, 2016/19

Jonathan
Jonathan
1 month ago
Reply to  Tommo

Completely agree the Maastricht treaty should have been a referendum level event.

Tommo
Tommo
1 month ago

And Little Napoleon has just won another five years SB

Andrew D
Andrew D
1 month ago

A little off the subject guys but just been reading the UK is sending 89 AS90s to the Ukraine .

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
1 month ago
Reply to  Andrew D

Good Int (or Intel as the Americans would say), Andrew. Leaves us with 90 guns.
I wonder when we will send surplus Warriors too.

Last edited 1 month ago by Graham Moore
David
David
1 month ago
Reply to  Andrew D

And possibly the tank swap arrangement with Poland which will provide T72s to Ukraine.

Hashmagandy
Hashmagandy
1 month ago

There’s a message for the Biden administration at the end of that quotation, the UK needs to be helped to maintain its economic strengths post-Brexit if it is to continue to be a meaningful global ally to the U.S.

David
David
1 month ago
Reply to  Hashmagandy

Biden’s view is unlikely to be generous, given that he has made it clear that he views brexit as a self inflicted wound……

Tommo
Tommo
1 month ago
Reply to  David

Biden also insists on talking of his families Irish roots no love lost there then

Rob
Rob
1 month ago

Stating the bleeding obvious; if we are deploying the whole front line tank strength of the British Army, gifting 20 AS90 to Ukraine as well as all the missiles these will need to be replaced. Defence spending or the contingency fund MUST replace every bit of kit we send to Ukraine or the defence budget will implode and our defences compromised. Sorry Gov but you need to somehow front up the cash.

Christopher Allen
Christopher Allen
1 month ago
Reply to  Rob

Not to mention we have no idea if anything can be salvaged from Ajax or if it has to be abandoned entirely. We should at least look at alternatives (presumably the CV90).

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
1 month ago
Reply to  Rob

Are we deploying 227 tanks?
I heard we were gifting far more than 20 AS90s, about 80?
Not everything needs to be replaced. Those AS90s don’t and probably the Mastiffs – they were surplus to requirements.
I wonder why we are not sending surplus Warriors?

David Barry
David Barry
1 month ago

Brexit, the gift that just keep giving.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
1 month ago
Reply to  David Barry

You’re better than that post….😉

David Barry
David Barry
1 month ago

You got me!

Paul.P
Paul.P
1 month ago
Reply to  David Barry

It keeps on giving because people are not prepared to accept that it has happened! The irony is that the government are the worst offenders. Obviously their commitment to the international ‘rules based order’ doesn’t apply to treaties they sign.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
1 month ago
Reply to  David Barry

Agreed. If we were still in the EU we would have had to wait for bureacracy to happen before we could grant lethal aid. We can make our own decisions now.

Tommo
Tommo
1 month ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

👍👍👍👍 we’d still be waiting for the Ink too dry before we could send Lethal aid

Paul.P
Paul.P
1 month ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

I don’t think that’s true. Co-ordination and agreement across EU nation ministers is needed only if you want to spend EU funds. You can do what you like if you spend your own money; which is what we have done.
That said I agree Ukraine is a coming of age for the EU.

Last edited 1 month ago by Paul.P
David Barry
David Barry
1 month ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

That is not true in defence related issues. Good answer, well presented, but, wrong.

Fail.

Tommo
Tommo
1 month ago

Slightly of piste here but could be quite worrying the CEO of V group the largest merchant ship management company had asked for NATO Naval escorts through the Black Sea ,NATO has stated that countries bordering such as Romania, Bulgaria and Turkey would be sending assets out too Clear bouyant Seamines that have been laid in the NW of the Black Sea but will not provide escorts for merchant vessels Hope it doesn’t go South like the Tanker wars of the Iran/ Iraq conflict when any State registered ship was targeted

JohninMK
JohninMK
1 month ago
Reply to  Tommo

Probably this CEO is trying to find a way round the decision by the insurance companies to refuse insurance cover for ships in the Black Sea.

Tommo
Tommo
1 month ago
Reply to  JohninMK

Could be Lloyd’s of London don’t like ringing the Luchins bell when ships are lost ,

Nicholas Bassett
Nicholas Bassett
1 month ago

All true of course, but absolutely nothing here that an average thirteen year-old wouldn’t have been able to write.