The UK has sent thousands of missiles and other explosives, over one hundred armoured vehicles and over 200,000 pieces of medical equipment and other items.

James Heappey, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Defence, recently said in a statement:

“The UK remains committed to working with our Allies and Partners to provide military and humanitarian assistance to Ukraine.

We continue to liaise closely with the Armed Forces of Ukraine to understand their prioritised requirements, to date having sent over 6,900 anti-tank missiles, 120 armoured vehicles, 1,360 anti-structure munitions, Air Defence systems including Starstreak missiles and 4.5 tonnes of plastic explosives. This is in addition to more than 200,000 pieces of non-lethal aid and medical equipment.

We are working to encourage and further enable the delivery of even more systems and capabilities from across the international community to support Ukraine. And continue to make a major contribution to the leadership and operation of the International Donor Coordination Centre in Stuttgart.”

Recently, I reported that British Defence secretary Ben Wallace said that donating the M270 multiple-launch rocket system to the country will help Ukraine defend itself against Russia. Alongside the weapon systems, the UK will also supply M31A1 munitions “at scale”.

Defence Secretary Ben Wallace said:

“The UK stands with Ukraine in this fight and is taking a leading role in supplying its heroic troops with the vital weapons they need to defend their country from unprovoked invasion. If the international community continues its support, I believe Ukraine can win.

As Russia’s tactics change, so must our support to Ukraine. These highly capable multiple-launch rocket systems will enable our Ukrainian friends to better protect themselves against the brutal use of long-range artillery, which Putin’s forces have used indiscriminately to flatten cities.”

Britain sending long range rocket artillery to Ukraine

The system can fire 12 missiles within a minute and can strike targets 50 miles away with high accuracy.

George has a degree in Cyber Security from Glasgow Caledonian University and has a keen interest in naval and cyber security matters and has appeared on national radio and television to discuss current events. He also works for the NHS. George is on Twitter at @geoallison
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Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker
5 days ago

Pretty much same a last time with M270 added on. They better be careful with the 3 of them. We need them back. Maybe we could loan them more until they don’t need them.

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker
5 days ago
Reply to  Monkey spanker

Wonder if they want some land rovers, we have loads. More artillery. Anywhere russia has been is bombed out mostly already. U.K. should order replacement ASAP. Give as-90, get M777 as urgent buy. Get training them on the spare Westland apache that could be left over. 12-17. They may need fixed up a bit but 3-6 months training would be a start. I think this conflict isn’t going to be over in 3 months. Get helicopter pilots. Fast track through U.K. training. Couple of training operations. Throw in some Blackhawks/mil-8, some gazelles/polish mil-2 or whatever it is they built. Czech… Read more »

Last edited 5 days ago by Monkey spanker
Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
5 days ago
Reply to  Monkey spanker

Apache would be a huge step. The Ukrainians have no experience or logistics for it. I’m not sure what use it would be to them that they cannot get from drone(s) or M270? Thing is that while the UK may not have the largest number of platforms we do have quite decent stocks of most expendable munitions. I don’t think this will be over that fast unless we arm the Ukrainians better so they can deal better with the infinite amount of meat (excuse horrible image) Mad Vlad wants to put in the grinder in time expired tin cans. That… Read more »

Joe16
Joe16
5 days ago

I watched an interesting video by the Austrian army on their update and analysis of the Ukraine fighting. It was really quite nuanced in the analysis, and included some information that isn’t covered by the big picture reporting that we’re used to hearing. They suggested that the T62s were actually not a bad choice for using as an assault gun, which is apparently what the Russians seem to be using them for in the east. They’re not seeing a lot of tank-on-tank combat, and A T-62 will cook up just the same as a T-72 when hit by a javelin… Read more »

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
5 days ago
Reply to  Joe16

Maybe that was the thinking – maybe not.

Either way they are old garbage that any decent NATO weapon will take out with ease.

I agree that analysis often needs more nuance.

Joe16
Joe16
5 days ago

I’ve no doubt that they’re using them because they don’t have enough of the better gear. Just interesting that they seem to be deliberately re-organising their BTGs to make best use of their now limited resources, rather than just blindly replacing T-72s with T-62s in tank units that might expect to be fighting other armour.

Aaron L
Aaron L
5 days ago
Reply to  Monkey spanker

I would replace the light guns with the M777’s and get the Hanwha K9 as the AS90 replacement

George Parker
George Parker
4 days ago
Reply to  Monkey spanker

Are you sure the corrupt failed state of Ukraine is worth the expense to the British taxpayer? Sell to them for hard cash by all means, at top prices with no credit. But even then, all we are doing is pouring fuel on a fire for no gain. With the very real possibility that it will blow up in our faces. In a thermonuclear manner. Russia will not sacrifice it’s ethnic people to the Ukrainians or it’s Black Sea Fleet. The Ukrainians will not concede any territory to Russia even though the majority of inhabitants only speak Russian and want… Read more »

peter Wait
peter Wait
3 days ago
Reply to  George Parker

If Russia’s army is not exhausted in Ukraine it will move on to Moldovia , Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania !

George Parker
George Parker
2 days ago
Reply to  peter Wait

If the Russians set foot on the territory of any NATO member, all bets are off.

Gavin Gordon
Gavin Gordon
5 days ago
Reply to  Monkey spanker

Like this for instance, MS? Strong case for long range GMLRS rather than 70km ‘ because west doesn’t want to hit Russia’. How about not wanting them to hit our weapons donated to Ukraine?

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker
5 days ago
Reply to  Gavin Gordon

It’s going to happen it’s a war zone. Stuff blows up. Afghan mission this is not. What can be used to push Russia back out. Combined arms is all I can think of. Tanks, troops, gunships, artillery and rockets, drones better situational awareness and tactics. Ukraine can’t get stuck in a slugging match over fixed lines. It will just wear them down

Meirion X
Meirion X
5 days ago
Reply to  Monkey spanker

The Ukrainians need better area air cover and support as well?

Gavin Gordon
Gavin Gordon
3 days ago
Reply to  Monkey spanker

Indeed it is! but I fail to see why we are playing by Russian rules, MS? Putin hits seven bells out of Ukraine whilst threatening anyone who hits back at the smug bastard on his. And the West lets him to a significant degree, supplying about enough capacity to hurt Russians when on Ukraine’s own territory. Of course, Ukraine is fighting on our behalf as well as it’s own, and has accepted the premise if we supply equipment. But give them the best i.e. 300km GMLRS, long range anti ship, armour, or whatever. That way they can stand back somewhat… Read more »

eclipse
eclipse
5 days ago

Are there any Western munitions that a Grad could use? I don’t doubt the Ukrainians are running low on their own stocks if they haven’t run out in some places, and I think other countries who operate Russian weapon systems have excessively large stockpiles either. Or is there any chance of the West producing some sort of arm that a Grad could use?

Uninformed Civvy Lurker
Uninformed Civvy Lurker
5 days ago
Reply to  eclipse

Good idea.

It’s not like it’s rocket science……oh hang on…….

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
5 days ago
Reply to  eclipse

The GRAD is pretty primitive.

Much better if focussing on M270 of which there are large stockpiles of missiles in storage. M270, depending on version, is really accurate. So should be one missile one kill.

Reactivating properly stores munitions is quicker than inventing and testing new ones.

Simon
Simon
5 days ago
Reply to  eclipse

Pretty sure Egypt manufacture there own improved rockets for there BM-21. Poland also had BM-21 in service as well

maurice10
maurice10
5 days ago

There are signs this war is getting bogged down in trench tactics similar to WW1. If so, the emphasis will be on artillery and MLRS will help to keep the Russian forces firmly placed in the east. I can’t help feeling that artillery needs to be a new priority including cruise missiles for the UK. In combination with drones, Ukraine is proving the worth of artillery and how poorly the MOD has treated the RA in recent decades.

Donald Allan MacColl
Donald Allan MacColl
5 days ago
Reply to  maurice10

Trench tactics wouldn’t last long infront of a tank force or mech infantry force.

Frank62
Frank62
5 days ago

If there’s plenty of anti-tank weaponry facing them, then the tank can’t work like it did on the WW1 western front.

Donald Allan MacColl
Donald Allan MacColl
4 days ago
Reply to  Frank62

True but Ukraine doesn’t have much anti-tank weaponry capable of taking out a tank per round. but then again Maybe it has. Another thing is repeated tank attacks cost plenty ammo. trenches are vunrobell to airstrickes too.

David Barry
David Barry
5 days ago

I hope Ben Wallace can return his attention to our mil.

Tough soldiers can survive in the open with arty support: raise another reg PARA Bn, re-invigorated RA – deep fires, counter battery and AD widened out?

Step back from AJAX and save money? All Challys upgraded.

Serious conventions should be challenged.

Aaron L
Aaron L
5 days ago
Reply to  David Barry

Agree mostly but I think that either Ajax or an Ajax like vehicle is needed (think CV90) as CRV(T) is getting rather long in the tooth now and needs replacing. RA definitely needs some love – a program to replace the light gun and the AS90 should be a priority. Not sure we should be shipping out our limited number of M270 without a replacement in the pipeline either. Air defense for the RA is also needs work. All the Challengers all need to be upgraded. I think most can agree that the number they’re planning on upgrading isn’t enough… Read more »

Paul.P
Paul.P
5 days ago

Spain is sending 40 early model Leopard tanks. Anyone know how these compare with a T72?

izzy
izzy
4 days ago
Reply to  Paul.P

If they’re Leopard I, not that well. If they’re Leopard II, they should be better, though that depends on the model of the T72 and how well it’s been maintained.

Paul.P
Paul.P
4 days ago
Reply to  izzy
Jacko
Jacko
5 days ago

The latest in Russian anti missile technology 🥴 they really are sending these relics forward!

https://defence-blog.com/russians-equip-cold-war-era-tanks-with-improvised-anti-javelin-armor/

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker
5 days ago
Reply to  Jacko

The slat armor they have crudely applied doesn’t work much. If applied correctly it can stop some munitions but not NLAW and javelin. I can’t say about the rest of missiles. This picture is in the Kearson region so they are in an area that a counter attack is headed.
It’s at the point where Ukraine needs loads more stuff if the plan is to force Russia out.

Joe16
Joe16
5 days ago

As a project manager in real life, I’m going to unapologetically ask for a tabulated list, which would make it much easier to evaluate than a body of text!
That said, thanks for keeping track, it’s good to see that aid continues to flow.

George Parker
George Parker
4 days ago

Ukraine is simply not worth the investment. Before 2014 it was the most corrupt country in Europe, afterwards things became even worse! I appreciate the poisoning of former agents and use of Sarin by Putin on British soil was bad form. But is it worth the cost for a little “tit for tat.” It is certainly not worth escalating an already dangerous potential nuclear war. I fear NATO involvement has more to do with the crooked business dealings of Hunter Biden and his father “quid pro – sleepy Joe.” Than any desire to prop up a failed state. Then there… Read more »

izzy
izzy
4 days ago
Reply to  George Parker

The idea that the Bidens business dealings have any influence on NATO (especially UK) support of Ukraine is so laughable it’s hardly worth responding to. Do we need to go down the pit of Republican-Trumpish self-delusion? It is not utterly unreasonable, if you want to be cynical, to say that Boris and co are using his support of Ukraine as a distraction from Partygate and the economic woes brought on by pandemic, inflation, and Brexit mismanagement. On the other hand, Boris has always preferred to wave the UK flag and dam the consequences. Risk of nuclear war is indeed serious.… Read more »

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
1 day ago
Reply to  George Parker

George, is it right for a country (even one with corruption) to be brutally invaded by a huge neighbour who has committed hundreds of thousands of war crimes against ordinary people? Then for us in the West to standby and say that they are not worth helping?

George Parker
George Parker
13 hours ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Right and wrong in the context of international politics are not simply relative terms, dependant on the position of the partisan observer. I postulate that they are meaningless. One mans invader being another mans liberator. The Russia v Ukraine spat is far from black and white. Both sides are masters of propaganda, subterfuge and weaponising information. They did after all learn from the same Soviet KGB masters. Do you honestly believe that Ukrainian extreme right wing militias have not committed severe injustices against ethnic Russians. There is more than just a kernel of truth in the reports dating back to… Read more »

George Parker
George Parker
13 hours ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Graham, I should have started with the following. What I think is of little consequence.

As a PFC these days and not in uniform. I’m trying to be impartial and unravel the Ukrainian Gordian knot. Oligarchs on both sides have used historic prejudices to justify and promote their own agendas. By using the various ethnic racial and religious divides of that region.
I hope this helps because the BBC, ITN, CNN etc tell less than half the story.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
10 hours ago
Reply to  George Parker

Thanks George. I don’t think about the politicians and oligarchs, just the ordinary people.

George Parker
George Parker
1 hour ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Sadly the militias listen to the politicians/oligarchs and implement their prejudiced policies. Right Sector and Azov, for example. Trying to deny it, simply adds to the crimes they commit. As I said. Both sides in this conflict are less than worthy of our support. I truly detest Putin because I know how and where he was trained. He is behaving exactly as one would expect from a proud KGB Stasi trained Colonel. Many Ukrainians are the product of the very same system. The question needs to be asked. Why are we supporting them and risking the very real possibility of… Read more »

izzy
izzy
4 days ago

An interesting comparison is the Vietnam War. Russians complain about the west sending arms to Ukraine but during the Vietnam War, the Russians sent 1,357 missile launching systems, 18,300 missiles, 316 fighter jets, 52 warships, 21 transportation ships, 687 tanks, 601 armored vehicles and 1,332 artillery pieces to Vietnam… Of course, that was over a 10-year period…