Two contracts, worth collectively over £100 million, have been awarded to Babcock to support the development of the UK’s future nuclear deterrent.

The Ministry of Defence say that the first, worth £66 million, has been awarded to Babcock to provide in-service submarine support expertise into the development of the UK’s Dreadnought Class submarines – the future of the UK’s nuclear deterrent.

“Covering the next 4.5 years, the contract will see Babcock provide the Ministry of Defence with technical and management support, engineering best practice and submarine maintenance achievability. Supporting the Prime Minister’s priority to grow the economy, the contract will sustain a total of 150 jobs, primarily in Bristol, but also include specialised roles across other key sites, including Devonport, Clyde, Barrow in Furness, Leicester and Warrington.       

In addition, Babcock has also been awarded a £55 million contract by BAE Systems for Weapon Handling and Launch System (WHLS) and Submerged Signal Ejector equipment for boats 2-4 of the Dreadnought Class. The contract will support a further 100 jobs across the UK and will see Babcock work with BAE Systems and the MOD together to ensure the Dreadnought Class is delivered on time.”

This programme will support the design, development, and manufacture of the four new Dreadnought Class ballistic missile submarines – the largest submarines ever to be operated by the Royal Navy.

Minister for Defence Procurement, James Cartlidge said:

“It is undeniable the pivotal role that British industry plays in the defence of our nation and our Allies, and I’m committed to supporting UK companies who are continuing to bolster our security whilst driving prosperity across our economy.”

Babcock CEO David Lockwood said:

“Contributing our extensive expertise on the complex support submarines require is a hugely important aspect to the design of this new platform.  By participating early in the programme, we will help to maximise the UK’s future defence capabilities.”

The new Dreadnought Class submarines will be over 150 metres long and will have a crew of 130 personnel. In a first for a Royal Navy submarine, innovative new lighting will allow the crew to simulate night and day and it will be the first Royal Navy submarine to be built with separate female crew quarters.

It will also have modern gym facilities for the crew, including exercise bikes, rowers, weights, benches, a running machine and cross trainer.

Tom has spent the last 13 years working in the defence industry, specifically military and commercial shipbuilding. His work has taken him around Europe and the Far East, he is currently based in Scotland.
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Redshift
Redshift
1 month ago

Dropping comments like

“Supporting the Prime Minister’s priority to grow the economy”

into press releases about something as fundamental, and mundane, a this one isnt going to keep Rishi in his job!

Jonno
Jonno
1 month ago
Reply to  Redshift

Best to keep Defence out of politics if possible.

DRS
DRS
1 month ago

Can they not retrofit a night and day system and artificial windows etc in current subs? I would have thought that would be a morale booster. Any chance for a Sauna/Steamroom to go with the gym? All small things that help retention etc

Tommo
Tommo
1 month ago
Reply to  DRS

DRS Extra pay is one thing Sundodgers get for retention but unfortunately the curse of social media seems too rear its head and its absence when Boats are on patrol now has hit people joining the service young people want continuous access too things like Meta ,X, tiktok or UKDJ hot bunking and a mess DVD night don’t seem too be a hit nowadays

Mark
Mark
1 month ago
Reply to  Tommo

Honestly, getting a window away from all the social media shite would be a plus for me.

Tommo
Tommo
1 month ago
Reply to  Mark

Cheers Mark UKDJ is the only page worth partaking on Social media should not be allowed within the realms of national security and defence ” loose fingers sink ” so too speak or tap 😉

Marked
Marked
1 month ago
Reply to  Tommo

Hot bunking is a thing of the past. Subs have increased in size whilst crew size has reduced.

Tommo
Tommo
1 month ago
Reply to  Marked

Quite correct on that I put that in as a downside for Sundodging As and Vs have enough Bunks prior too those Boats it was hotbunking for most ratings on a 2 watch system

Steve Davies
Steve Davies
28 days ago
Reply to  Tommo

I agree,remember Join The Navy and see the world,not any more.I served for 4 years aboard HMS Resolution in the late 60s and 8 weeks was a normal patrol.A recent Trident patrol lasted 26 weeks due to a lack of available vessels, I am lost for words.

Tommo
Tommo
27 days ago
Reply to  Steve Davies

Cheers Steve, a 26 wk patrol slighty unhealthy Tinned food and lack of Vitamin D isn’t an advert for the silent service hope that ,that extended patrol was a 1 off

Coll
Coll
1 month ago
Reply to  DRS

When you mean like artificial windows, do you mean fake scenery with a UV light backdrop or VR?

Expat Alien
Expat Alien
1 month ago
Reply to  DRS

Remember one of the R boats had lattice windows with a fish tank behind..Reason given was “we like to see what’s going on outside”

Bill
Bill
1 month ago
Reply to  DRS

DRS: I assume that your comment was somewhat tongue in cheek, however about 3 or 4 years ago I was offered a tour of a Viking Cruise line ship and it did have a Sauna and -if I recall correctly a steamroom as well and this was in addition to a huge log fire TV screen. And this was primarily due to the senior crew’s heritage, Norwegian .

Tommo
Tommo
27 days ago
Reply to  Bill

Just read your thread, Bill, served NP2010 on the Stenna also had a Sauna but someone put a load of Sheep Fleeces in it and stunk the woodwork out deeming it unusable give JACK a new toy and he’ll F it up

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
1 month ago

That CGI rendition of Dreadnaught sure looks menacing.

geoff
geoff
1 month ago

Good Morning Daniele. It sure does, and from memory quite different from earlier renditions. I know a million pounds ain’t what it used to be, but a hundred million pounds is still a lot of money and the explanation about what it is to be spent on, is as always, pretty vague! I remember back more than a decade or so reading about an amount of 400 million pounds to be spent on the Carriers with a similarly fuzzy description on what was to be done for that huge sum and that didn’t include any hardware!
Cheers from muggy Durban

Toby J
Toby J
1 month ago
Reply to  geoff

The first iterations of Dreadnaught looked very much like stretched Astute, rather than the much nicer new streamlined sail.

geoff
geoff
1 month ago
Reply to  Toby J

👍

Toby J
Toby J
1 month ago

Best looking boats we’ve ever built. Or anyone else, for that matter

Paul T
Paul T
1 month ago

I wonder if the renditions/CGI images of Dreadnought are something of a Red Herring,it wouldn’t surprise me if she looks different when she is rolled out.

Toby J
Toby J
1 month ago
Reply to  Paul T

I don’t think so, BAE have made too much of the design of Dreadnought with X-planes, streamlined sail etc. for it to look different.
The third (after Zumwalt and Visby) of the truly futuristic warship classes

Coll
Coll
1 month ago

O/T Reading some articles that could suggest that Babcock could pitch the Arrowhead 140 to Australia.

Tom
Tom
1 month ago

Cool… some new skilled jobs across various sites. Good for people, good for the economy.

I doubt however, that the UK economy will go into turbo drive, with a few hundred jobs in the defence sector, as the PM has suggested.

monkey spanker
monkey spanker
1 month ago
Reply to  Tom

Defence could have turbo drived a bit. Take the chancellor’s tax cuts. That money could have been used to make military kit in the U.K. for Ukraine. Investment instead of some tax cut that benefits the better off in society the most.

Tom
Tom
1 month ago
Reply to  monkey spanker

I couldn’t agree more MS.

simon alexander
simon alexander
1 month ago

will the dreadnought design feed into AUKUS project or astute + or complete fresh design?

Paul T
Paul T
1 month ago

AUKUS – the Astute design is already mature,once Agincourt is built that’s as far as that design will go.

simon alexander
simon alexander
1 month ago
Reply to  Paul T

PT thanx, so the AUKUS sub is fresh design, possibly with using experience of building astute and is intended to replace astute.

Ron
Ron
30 days ago

I suspect that the AUKUS would be based on the Dreadnought class. The aft section powerplant RR PWR 3 would be the same so that dictates diameter. With the same powerplant the X tail will remain. I cannot be sure but with the way missile development is going it would seem as the new AUKUS class would have 3-4 multi mission payload modules midships. I do wonder if the new SSNs will have something like the German IDAS possibly using the TRIPLE-M mast. If so that would dictate an alteration to the fin design. Otherwise the fin would be a… Read more »

simon alexander
simon alexander
30 days ago
Reply to  Ron

Hi Ron, good comments can see Oz wanting the longer boats. bigger will mean less nimble as you say. the plus is that there will be greater production of boats and more resources

monkey spanker
monkey spanker
1 month ago

While the submarine will be a new design it will use evolution of parts from previous designs.
Having subs in constant design and build allows for improvements of parts and sustainment of suppliers.
Couldn’t even imagine how hard it would be starting from scratch. The Taiwanese have just went through this process.

Geoffi
Geoffi
1 month ago

The Dreadnought class is quite evil-looking…