Babcock will lead a major programme of Ukrainian naval projects, which includes the delivery of new fast attack craft, a modern frigate capability, shipborne armaments and the training of naval personnel.

Babcock International Group has signed a tripartite Memorandum of Implementation (MoI) in Odesa with the Ministry of Defence of Ukraine and the UK Government.

Quin and his Ukrainian counterpart.

Building on the agreement signed in October 2020, the two nations will now push forward a major programme of Ukrainian naval projects, with Babcock as their designated prime industrial partner. Reflecting Babcock’s extensive naval experience and capabilities, the firm say it has been chosen to lead in the delivery of the scope of the broad ranging Ukrainian Naval Capabilities Enhancement Programme (UNCEP).

According to a news release from the firm:

“The programme includes the enhancement of capabilities on existing naval platforms, the delivery of new platforms, including fast attack missile craft, a modern frigate capability, shipborne armaments and the training of naval personnel. It also involves working together to regenerate Ukrainian shipyards by developing, implementing and completing a Shipyard Regeneration Plan.”

Babcock CEO David Lockwood joined Deputy Minister of Defence of Ukraine Oleksandr Myroniuk, UK Minister for Defence Procurement Jeremy Quin and First Sea Lord Admiral Sir Tony Radakin to sign the MoI on-board the UK Royal Navy’s Type 45 destroyer HMS Defender, which is part of the UK’s Carrier Strike Group.

Babcock say they will lead British and Ukrainian industrial partners to assist the Ukrainian Ministry of Defence in delivering these projects.

“Working collaboratively, these teams will be fully integrated within the projects, building ownership and expertise through technical and knowledge transfer and enabling Ukraine to develop a modern naval fleet and support capability.”

Babcock CEO David Lockwood said:

“We are very proud to support Ukraine with their Naval Capabilities Enhancement Programme.  This marks the beginning of a new international relationship for Babcock, bringing together our new ship capability, our infrastructure and support capability and our strong relationship with the UK Government. I know that we can bring our collective experience and knowledge together to achieve some really great things. Our strengthened relationship with the UK Government has been instrumental in underpinning this significant agreement which is supported by UK Export finance and we continue to work with them on a number of international opportunities.”

UK Minister for Defence Procurement Jeremy Quin said:

“The UK and Ukraine have a close defence relationship, and we continue to strengthen this partnership to help deter shared threats. I am delighted that British and Ukrainian industry will work together on these projects, which will provide world-leading capabilities and provide opportunities for both our nations to boost our shipbuilding enterprises.”

The Ukrainian Ministry of Defence said:

“Ukraine and the UK are good friends and allies. Today’s Memorandum gives a new impetus to our co-operation in naval industry and will facilitate further development of the Ukrainian Navy. We appreciate the British support and value your experience.”

Babcock will be supported by several other companies with a strong UK presence, including MBDA, Thales, and Royal Haskoning DHV. They will also be working closely with Ukrainian industry in developing this programme.

Work will now begin on the contracts to implement a number of projects in the programme.

We’ve known that the UK would be building some ships for Ukraine for a while but now we know who will be building them.

UK to build military vessels for Ukraine

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Ian M.
Ian M.
3 months ago

A type 31?

ChariotRider
ChariotRider
3 months ago
Reply to  Ian M.

Hi Ian, That was my first thought, given that Babcock are lead on this deal and are leading the T31 programme. If the T31 wins the Greek requirement as well than it would be more great news for the UK. Given the success of the T26 design sales of the T31 as well would be a significant endoursement of the National Shipbuilding Strategy. It would be nice to see a National Space and Aviation Strategy to help deal with the post COVID recovery and to facilitate technology transfer from atmospheric to space applications, e.g. Reaction Engines pre-cooler tech. Finally, we… Read more »

Ian M.
Ian M.
3 months ago
Reply to  ChariotRider

Export AJAX? 😁 

Steve
Steve
3 months ago
Reply to  ChariotRider

We could be looking to sell a few t23’s to them.

Pete
Pete
3 months ago
Reply to  Ian M.

T31+ Neptune integrated

Pete
Pete
3 months ago
Reply to  Ian M.

Although in unlikely event they won the Greek needs as well would that not threaten the RN Type 31 program schedule given the urgency of the Greek need. …hope not.

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
3 months ago

I wonder if Putin will hit back at this, or at least feel more threatened by a pro-Western Ukraine.
Can’t be long before Ukraine formally applies to join NATO.

ChariotRider
ChariotRider
3 months ago
Reply to  Graham Moore

Hi Graham, The NATO treaty requires that any new applicant has to have settled all boarder disputes before it can be accepted into the alliance, which probably explains why the UKraine has not already applied to join. If you think about it, what would there be to prevent countries from joining the alliance and paying their dues if they could simply join when threatened, so the requirement is a sensible one. However, it means that all Putin has to do is keep things bubbling along on the boarder and the Ukraine will not be able to join NATO. Which is… Read more »

David
David
3 months ago
Reply to  ChariotRider

“.. have settled all boarder disputes …”

he Russians are paying for their occupation?

An up-armed (missiled) T31 would be a great advertisement for the Class.

ChariotRider
ChariotRider
3 months ago
Reply to  David

DOH! 🙂

As for the up armed T31, I suspect pretty much anybody who buys them will put more silos on them. The offering to the Greeks showed a significant increase in that respect (can’t remember the number 32 MK41 I think).

Cheers CR

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
3 months ago
Reply to  ChariotRider

Hi CR,

Thanks for that post. Of interest is that the Ukraine has been a PfP nation since ’94 (as is Russia!) and that 14 former PfP nations have since joined NATO. I agree with your assessment of the rationale behind Putin’s game plan; he is a cunning old fox.

Cheers
Graham

AlbertStarburst
AlbertStarburst
3 months ago

Can we (RN) have some fast attack craft / missile boats too please?

David
David
3 months ago

No! Go back to the paddling lake and make do with some canoes.

AlbertStarburst
AlbertStarburst
3 months ago
Reply to  David

Harsh.

My nappy is full now anyway.

David Steeper
David Steeper
3 months ago

Now children play nice or no ice cream !

AlbertStarburst
AlbertStarburst
3 months ago
Reply to  David Steeper

99 with squirty sauce for me please  🙂 

David Steeper
David Steeper
3 months ago

Lol

Ron
Ron
3 months ago

I agree, I have often argued for ten Harmina type Fast Attack Boats, two for each T31. They could be the replacements for the P2000s. Possibly to be based in Cyprus, Oman, Singapore/Brunei and the UK.

AlbertStarburst
AlbertStarburst
3 months ago
Reply to  Ron

I would still argue for a “mother ship” to host 4-6 small fast attack/missile boats, to cross blue water and then operate in coastal areas in support of say the carrier group or an ongoing threat.

James Fennell
James Fennell
3 months ago

Only of use in enclosed waters – traditionally navies in the White Sea, Baltic, Black Sea, Caspian, Gulf, Eastern Med, Red Sea, Agean, Adriatic, Malacca Straights and South China Sea went for these. For a blue water navy something to counter them is better – Wildcat with Sea Venom is designed for this. Lynx with Sea Skua did a good job against FACs in the Gulf.

Last edited 3 months ago by James Fennell
AlbertStarburst
AlbertStarburst
3 months ago
Reply to  James Fennell

Transport across blue water to theatre.

Big fan of Lynx (I’m ex Westland)

Paul.P
Paul.P
3 months ago

Excellent news. Well done Babcock! This looks very much like the first T31e order. Government and industry working together. I need to pinch myself. Along with hydrogen powered London buses being built in Ballymena this news has got my day off to a bright start.

Paul.P
Paul.P
3 months ago

”Our strengthened relationship with the UK Government has been instrumental in underpinning this significant agreement which is supported by UK Export finance and we continue to work with them on a number of international opportunities.”
Excellent…we have finally learned from the French way of doing things.

Paul.P
Paul.P
3 months ago

Anybody have any info on the design of the fast attack boats?

Paul.P
Paul.P
3 months ago
Reply to  Paul.P

Thx. This class was built by Vospers so I would expect BAE to own this design now. Still, no reason they couldn’t sell it to Babcock I suppose.

James Fennell
James Fennell
3 months ago
Reply to  Paul.P

Improved Vosper Thornycroft Super-Vitas / Barzans – these are in service with Greece and were built in numbers for Qatar, Oman etc. in the 1990s. Babcock in Portsmouth is the current VT descendent so owns IP. The image above is a Qatari Barzan. They have 8 Exocet, a 76mm Oto, 2 30mm singles, a Mistral SAM launcher and a Goalkeeper CIWS. The Greek versions have 8 Exocet, a 76mm Oto, two twin 30mm and a RAM CIWS. Short range coastal defence vessels – 35kts.

Last edited 3 months ago by James Fennell
Paul.P
Paul.P
3 months ago
Reply to  James Fennell

Thx: quite a package.

Fedaykin
Fedaykin
3 months ago
Reply to  James Fennell

Babcock don’t hold the IP for the Super Vita/Barzan, VT went to BAE Systems so they would be the holders of the design. Also note that Babcock have no presence in Portsmouth contrary to what you have written here, it is BAE Systems Surface Ships who are based in Portsmouth. Babcock have yards in Rosyth and Plymouth. So far it has been purely speculation that the design on offer to Ukraine would be based on the Super Vita, now Babcock are in the picture I wouldn’t be surprised if another design is considered. Considering Babcocks prior relationship with VARD Marine… Read more »

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
3 months ago
Reply to  Fedaykin

Vard 7 looks superficially like a mini Corvette or is there a version that is more a ‘fast attack vessel’ ? Would think for a Country like Ukraine with its obvious opponent the smaller and faster it’s attack craft could be while retaining effective weaponry the better otherwise they just become expensive targets they can’t risk using in a conflict. If it starts to become anything more than that then you might as well make it a Frigate (or similar) and give it real teeth and range that could operate with allies too. And they are according this looking at… Read more »

Fedaykin
Fedaykin
3 months ago
Reply to  Spyinthesky

The VARD 7 is marketed as an OPV but it is really a design family with a fair amount of flexibility to be developed in whatever manner the end customer wants. The core concept in all likilhood could be adapted into a FAC if required. I agree that a FAC is highly suited to their local needs. Also just for your reference the Ukraine is buying two MILGEM ADA Class Corvettes from Turkey and wants to upgrade their lone Krivak-III frigate as well. They also have aspirations on adding more frigates to their fleet with the Perry Class being mentioned… Read more »

Challenger
Challenger
3 months ago

This is intriguing. Presumably the fast attack craft will be built under licence by Babcock given that the design is owned by BAE. I guess from their point of view they will still make money from selling the licence without having to do the actual construction work.

The mention of frigates could either mean flogging some refitted T23’s as they leave service or getting them onboard for Type 31. Hope it’s the latter as surely Ukraine wouldn’t want clapped out 35 year old T23’s.

Finney
Finney
3 months ago
Reply to  Challenger

Intriguing indeed, are they really going to rehash a 40/50 year old design though? Seems foolish to me. I wonder how much Ukrainian equipment will be fitted too, I presume they make high power naval diesels there somewhere as we don’t anymore.

DaveyB
DaveyB
3 months ago
Reply to  Finney

Ukraine used to provide the diesel and gas turbine engines to the Russian Navy. The border conflict stopped all deliveries, so Russia had to look at outsourcing through China and reverse engineering.

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
3 months ago
Reply to  DaveyB

A lot of its rocket engines too I believe.

Spyinthesky
Spyinthesky
3 months ago
Reply to  Finney

If not I’m sure MTU could provide something.

James Fennell
James Fennell
3 months ago
Reply to  Challenger

Didn’t BAe sell its Portsmouth Dockyard interests to Babcock in 2010? That was VT.

Last edited 3 months ago by James Fennell
Fedaykin
Fedaykin
3 months ago
Reply to  James Fennell

No, it is all BAE Systems in Portsmouth.

Paul.P
Paul.P
3 months ago

Looks like our presence and influence in the Ukraine is upsetting someone…https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2021/06/23/russia-claims-warship-has-fired-warning-shots-deter-british/

Fedaykin
Fedaykin
3 months ago

Very much open to interpretation at this point in time so I would not be getting excited about a possible Type 31 sale quite yet. Their Krivak III probably needs a modernisation and work done to allow it to operate better with NATO naval forces…Link 11/Link 22, secure comms etc. After that it should be noted that Ukraine has already ordered 2 MILGEM ADA class corvette so there will need to be work done to support the integration of them into their fleet. Maybe we are eying selling a surplus T23 to them which would require SLEP and modernisation package.… Read more »

Jon
Jon
3 months ago

This was obviously planned!

Even if you didn’t mean to leave them on the bus stop, you would have had them in a bag so not to attract contents to files saying eyes only!

So they sat at the bus stop, opened the bag and left them on the bench.

This is no accident!!