BAE Systems has received a contract from Lockheed Martin to ensure the readiness of critical EW systems on the F-35.

Under the five-year contract, BAE Systems will manage the supply chain and establish the infrastructure necessary to make sure the systems are ‘mission capable and available’.

“As a leader in EW systems for the world’s most advanced aircraft, we understand how critical readiness is for our customers,” said Betsy Warren, director of F-35 Sustainment at BAE Systems, Inc.

“We’ll ensure that the F-35 EW supply chain is in place for Lockheed Martin and the Department of Defense.”

The EW suite for the F-35 is the AN/ASQ-239 system. The system’s advanced avionics and sensors provide a real-time, 360-degree view of the battlespace, helping to maximise detection ranges and provide the pilot with options to evade, engage, counter, or jam threats say BAE.

Under the contract, BAE Systems will maintain regional warehouses with on-hand inventories of critical EW components to improve fill rates and reduce wait times. The company will also establish various metrics that will be used to further strengthen confidence in the supply chain.

Recently, the Ministry of Defence said that the first 9 of the UK’s currently 15 strong F-35B fleet will arrive at RAF Marham in Summer.

It is understood that the jets will be supported on the move by Voyager tankers. British F-35B initial operational capability is scheduled will be declared in December 2018 for land and the from the Queen Elizabeth class aircraft carriers in 2020.

A very informative timelime from Save The Royal Navy.

Recently 617 Squadron, immortalised by the Dambuster raid of World War II, was reformed to fly the F-35. Gavin Williamson announced the new 617 Squadron after an event in Washington DC to mark the centenary of the RAF, which was attended by Chief of the Air Staff, Air Chief Marshal Sir Stephen Hillier.

Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson said:

“The 617 Squadron name was made famous by ‘The Dambusters’, who played such a vital role in the Second World War. So it is fitting that by flying the world’s most advanced fighter jets, our new squadron will be ensuring that the legend of world-leading air power lives on. The F-35B Lightning will defend our nation and ensure that Britain remains a pioneer in innovation, with a unique ability to adapt to this increasingly dangerous world.

The UK is currently flying the F-35B Lightning, a multi-role fighter jet capable of a wide range of operations. It is the world’s first jet to combine radar evading stealth technology with supersonic speeds and short take-off and landing capability.”

Lightning Force Commander Air Commodore David Bradshaw said:

“This is a most momentous day for the UK Lightning Force as we celebrate the reformation of 617 Squadron. Manned by highly capable Royal Air Force and Royal Navy personnel and equipped with the truly remarkable F-35B Lightning, 617 Squadron will once again provide potent, flexible Air Power for the nation.

In a simple yet highly significant ceremony held in the heart of Washington DC amongst friends and colleagues as part of celebrations for RAF100, the famous Dambusters marked the start of another exciting chapter in their Squadron’s proud history. I very much look forward to welcoming 617 Squadron home to RAF Marham this summer as they prepare for operational service from land and sea.”

Today’s 617 Squadron, currently training with the UK’s 15 F-35B Lightning jets in America, will move to the UK with a number of aircraft to their new home at RAF Marham this Summer. Like their predecessors they will be operating at the forefront of aircraft technology. The aircraft will be jointly operated by the Royal Air Force and the Royal Navy and have the ability to operate from land and sea, forming an integral part of Carrier Strike operating from the Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carriers.

The MoD has so far committed to 48 jets but has expressed an intent to purchase 138 of the aircraft, whether or not that is financially feasible remains to be seen.

3 COMMENTS

  1. Full operational capability for carrier enabled power projection not till 2026. That’s eight years from now. I really don’t know why it will take so long to achieve this milestone. I know that managing all the DLODS to ensure they all deliver on time is a huge challenge, but I can’t help thinking this could be done more quickly. Something wrong here. Israel is already flying combat missions. The USMC already fly off some of their flat tops. The trials on QE1 will already start later this year. The Italians want to be ready for combat operations off Cavour by 2023. Is it to do with aircraft availability? Pilot and ground crew availability? Weapon systems integration? All part of the DLODS, I know. But what’s pacing this glacial progress? Money or risk aversion?

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