British jets are reportedly gearing up to launch a series of air strikes against Iranian-backed Houthi rebels in the wake of recent attacks on shipping in the Red Sea.

Reports first published in The Times suggest that Britain plans to coordinate with Western allies, including the United States and possibly another European nation, to execute targeted missile strikes.

The potential targets include locations in the Red Sea or mainland Yemen, the base of the Houthi rebels.

The decision follows a warning from Grant Shapps, the UK Defence Secretary. On Sunday, Shapps stated, “If the Houthis continue to threaten lives and trade, we will be forced to take the necessary and appropriate action.”

The gravity of the situation is underscored by the planned release of an unprecedented joint statement by the UK and US, warning the Houthis against continued aggression towards commercial vessels.

The Houthi rebels have been actively targeting vessels in the Red Sea, a strategic maritime route. These actions are interpreted as demonstrations of support for Hamas in its conflict with Israel in Gaza.

The repercussions of these attacks have been far-reaching, many shipping companies have resorted to the longer, more expensive route around Africa’s Cape of Good Hope instead of passing through the Suez Canal.

Avatar photo
George has a degree in Cyber Security from Glasgow Caledonian University and has a keen interest in naval and cyber security matters and has appeared on national radio and television to discuss current events. George is on Twitter at @geoallison
Subscribe
Notify of
guest

32 Comments
oldest
newest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Mr Bell
Mr Bell
3 months ago

Things are starting to look like heating up in the middle east. Putin will be pleased anything that draws NATO and Western forces away from his attempted and bungled empire building in Ukraine is going to be beneficial.
Israel for example being given priority to replenish artillery shells via US stocks and production schedules is one example.
Everything that takes aid away from Ukraine is a danger.

David Lloyd
David Lloyd
3 months ago
Reply to  Mr Bell

There is no way that the pacifist president Joe Biden is going to authorise taking on the Houthi – it would be “escalatory”. Plus, it would upset the Ayatollahs and particularly the IRGC

Mr Bell
Mr Bell
3 months ago
Reply to  David Lloyd

Agree sleepy Joe isn’t going to hold any line. His foreign policy is weak, his decision making excessively slow and his leadership skills…lacking.

Paul.P
Paul.P
3 months ago
Reply to  Mr Bell

Checkout latest UKDJ article; a Wasp Class LHD and an LSD have entered the Eastern Med. A significant USMC force.

David Lloyd
David Lloyd
3 months ago
Reply to  Mr Bell

He clearly does not understand the application of military force in the achievement of diplomatic goals either

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
3 months ago
Reply to  David Lloyd

I think that comment shows what you don’t understand. Rather than the US’s diplomatic policies.

David Lloyd
David Lloyd
3 months ago
Reply to  Robert Blay

Well, lets consider a few recent American diplomatic successes then. Start with the preciptate Afghan pull out, which Biden did without bothering to consult ANY of his NATO allies. Obviously, Biden’s threat of sanctions failed to deter Putin’s invasion of Ukraine. Then Biden’s visit to Ireland to connect with his ancestors, insulting the British PM on the way. Or his decision to sell the Argentine 24 F-16’s. Then giving the Israelis the green light to bomb Gaza back into the stone age.

War is said to be diplomacy by other means. Do I understand that right?

Robert Blay
Robert Blay
3 months ago
Reply to  David Lloyd

So you wouldn’t bomb Hamas? Argentina getting F16 is better then Argentina getting closer relations to China with Chinese kit. The Americans are the ones doing the heavy lifting in all these conflict zones. Without American money and equipment, Russia would have been successful in Ukraine.

Jack
Jack
3 months ago
Reply to  David Lloyd

Maybe if the Houthis attacked an Irish ship he would do something 😂

John
John
3 months ago
Reply to  Jack

They don’t have crews anyway so no great loss.

Ian M.
Ian M.
3 months ago

O/T; Do you think the bridge warns the galley before executing a “handbrake turn” as in the top photo?

SailorBoy
SailorBoy
3 months ago
Reply to  Ian M.

I wouldn’t doubt it
“Evasive action” would probably get broadcast through the ship’s speakers to give crew a few seconds of warning.

Ian M.
Ian M.
3 months ago
Reply to  SailorBoy

Panic in the messes then?

SailorBoy
SailorBoy
3 months ago
Reply to  Ian M.

I hope the O/C has a gimbal for his mug of tea. God forbid one of His Majesty’s sailors spill their dinner!

Eric
Eric
3 months ago
Reply to  Ian M.

What strikes me as odd is that she is flying the White Ensign from the stern well out of any harbour.

Ian M.
Ian M.
3 months ago
Reply to  Eric

I’m ex-Army, don’t understand the significance of that.🙄

Eric
Eric
3 months ago
Reply to  Ian M.

When at sea, the ensign is usually flown from the mast.

Ian M.
Ian M.
3 months ago
Reply to  Eric

Ah! The big sticky up bit!
😄

Deep32
Deep32
3 months ago

Using Typhoons operating out of Cyprus! Surely this is what the QECs were designed and purchased for?
The fact that we are not shows just how far we need to go to bring our capabilities up to where they should be!!

ChrisLondon
ChrisLondon
3 months ago
Reply to  Deep32

Surely you never use a sinkable aircraft carrier when you have an unsinkable one? My only issue with that is we will need Egyptian or Israeli permission to overfly their territory.

SailorBoy
SailorBoy
3 months ago
Reply to  ChrisLondon

We could probably transit to Oman first, then launch strikes from there. It would allow quicker reactions to new targets without costly aerial refuelling.

Deep32
Deep32
3 months ago
Reply to  ChrisLondon

Using say Cyprus to support ops in Syria or the Levant makes sense. Using it or indeed Oman (never mind Arabic angle) doen’t really, as the distances to be covered all require dedicated tanker support. Cyprus to Yeman is approx 1500nm each way, while Oman to Yeman is approx 700 nm. Putting a carrier 100nm or so off shore would give you all sorts of options, not least the ability to launch strikes as and when required at a far higher rate then anything travelling 1000nm or more. Its what we have carriers for, only we dont have all our… Read more »

Levi Goldsteinberg
Levi Goldsteinberg
3 months ago
Reply to  Deep32

Yes it seems strange to me. We have bases in Oman, why not use them?

Simon
Simon
3 months ago

Use an Arabic base to attack another muslin country how does that conversation go?

Levi Goldsteinberg
Levi Goldsteinberg
3 months ago
Reply to  Simon

The Yemeni government is also at war with the Houthis

Deep32
Deep32
3 months ago

Hi Levi, see my reply to @ChrisLondon above.

Jack
Jack
3 months ago

Am I alone in thinking Mr Shapps talks too much ?

John
John
3 months ago
Reply to  Jack

No he is a jerk. Like the rest.

Marked
Marked
3 months ago
Reply to  Jack

Along with breathing too much…

Mr Bell
Mr Bell
3 months ago
Reply to  Jack

He does because he is a politician and a suit full of F’ all.

farouk
farouk
3 months ago

Forces News video on You Tube:
Calls for UK to deploy HMS Queen Elizabeth to Red Sea

Ex_Service
Ex_Service
3 months ago

It is not just the rebels’ ability to conduct strikes in the Red Sea (and further afield) which needs to be neutralised, but also the logistics which supply them.

If this is not achievable by HMG services, then an introspective review, by those who created this inability, and kick in the butt is necessary (stand in a circle and kick forward as hard as you can😉).