HMS Prince of Wales, an aircraft carrier functioning as NATO command ship, has arrived in Spain.

The Royal Navy say here that HMS Prince of Wales is currently the lead vessel in NATO’s Response Force – “which can be deployed anywhere at short notice to react to world events” – and has stopped in Rota on Spain’s west coast ahead of joint training led by Spain.

“The warship will be at heart of a multinational task force, but will first stop in the Bay of Cadiz port to prepare for the forthcoming exercises, as well as welcoming visitors, while adventurous training will be laid on for sailors, including cycling, kayaking, football and golf.”

Captain Richard Hewitt was quoted as saying:

“Taking command of HMS Prince of Wales while at sea, and sailing to Rota, to meet up with our Spanish allies, highlights our enduring commitment to NATO and our allies. Continuing HMS Prince of Wales journey as the NATO command ship for 2022 by operating with our Spanish allies emphasises that as an alliance, NATO continues to operate in defence of its citizens and territory.”

Prince of Wales will be involved in Spanish-led exercises – known as Flotilla Exercise 22, which will see navies from five nations test their ability to react to crises together over the coming weeks, say the Royal Navy.

It will involve a large contingent of Spanish warships plus NATO task groups which are responsible for the security and prosperity of the Mediterranean region, you can read more on this from the Royal Navy here.

George has a degree in Cyber Security from Glasgow Caledonian University and has a keen interest in naval and cyber security matters and has appeared on national radio and television to discuss current events. He also works for the NHS. George is on Twitter at @geoallison
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Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker
10 days ago

Nice time for a visit to Spain. Before schools holidays start. I wonder how many days she is staying in port for. Anyone been to Rota? Is it any good

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
9 days ago
Reply to  Monkey spanker

Beats flying with EasyJet etc atm.

What is wrong with sending the boys and girls to nice sunny places for exercises? Might make them happy and sign up for longer…….

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker
9 days ago

Yeah port visits are a great part of the navy I imagine. The crews work hard on the ships and deserve it.

Jonno
Jonno
9 days ago
Reply to  Monkey spanker

Not sure now, but many years ago in the Franco era, we went to an Open Day with some other Brits and we were all arrested and held in the guard house, by I think the US Marines, but it may have had Spanish input as well! We talked our way out with help from some Spanish friends. Interesting experience to say the least.

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker
8 days ago
Reply to  Jonno

Really selling it to me. Sounds great😂😂😂.
Is it a Spanish navy base or just a USN base

Jonno
Jonno
8 days ago
Reply to  Monkey spanker

I think its on the same basis (!) as the US bases in the UK. In effect some kind of lease to the USA. Great beaches and places to visit nearby: Seville, Cadiz, Jerez. In those days not a big tourist area and something of a backwater.
No hard feelings but we all felt a lot closer allies of USA afterwards!

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
10 days ago

A little off-topic yes, but worth posting for those interested in our maritime history.

“The discovery of a shipwrecked warship that sank while carrying a future King has been hailed the most important maritime find since the Mary Rose.

The Gloucester ran aground off the coast of Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, in 1682, nearly killing the Duke of York, who became King James II of England.
The find, which was discovered by divers in 2007, has only just been revealed due to security reasons.”

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-norfolk-61734192

_125347178_gloucester_warship_pa.jpg
Gavin Gordon
Gavin Gordon
9 days ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Yes, great reveal. Nice to know that two brothers found it, albeit well qualified, but kept it quiet for years for security in association with museums.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
9 days ago
Reply to  Gavin Gordon

Agreed!

Lordtemplar
Lordtemplar
10 days ago

Any Spanish Harriers in service? Interesting to see them land on the deck of HMS PoW

william james crawford
william james crawford
10 days ago
Reply to  Lordtemplar

Is my understanding that HMS Prince of Wales is only operating as a helicopter carrier, and has no fixed wing aircraft on board correct?

Paul42
Paul42
10 days ago

Yes, we don’t have any available to put on her. She is undoubtedly the largest LPH currently in service with any Navy anywhere…..very sad…..

Sean
Sean
10 days ago
Reply to  Paul42

Utter nonsense.

The QEs can act as both aircraft carriers and as LPH vessels. It’s called “versatility”, people with intelligence recognise than this is a good attribute to have.

Geoff Roach
Geoff Roach
9 days ago
Reply to  Sean

How do you recognise items if it’s only for “people with intelligence”?. You do realise that you don’t have to be insulting to respond to a post.

Paul42
Paul42
9 days ago
Reply to  Sean

The QE class are designed as fixed wing carriers. They do not possess littoral water capabilities normally required of an LPH. The idea that POW would act as some sort of LPH in support of Amphibious operations was scrapped a long time ago, I was at a briefing where it was made crystal clear that it would never happen, and some proposed mods to the ship were abandoned. At present the UK has F35Bs operating from land based locations focusing on re-inforcing certain countries, due to the crisis in Ukraine, bit like joint force Harrier spending a lot of its… Read more »

johan
johan
9 days ago
Reply to  Paul42

all good right up to airframes, UK has 24.5 F35s on strength, we lack Pilots as currently its about the 14 mark, due to training delays and pandemic and one thing and another.

Geoff Roach
Geoff Roach
9 days ago
Reply to  Paul42

Thank you Paul for a sensible and accurate situation report.

Mr Bell
Mr Bell
9 days ago
Reply to  Paul42

They are in service for 50+ years- large strong hulls with much upgrade potential. The QE class is without doubt the most cost efficient and effective carrier design in terms of flexibility and efficiency yet designed. Our carrier ambitions have only been let down by dreadfully slow integration of British weaponry onto the F35B frame and the slow ordering and commissioning rate of airframes. Add in the fact we only have 15 escorts available for front line service of which only 7 or 8 are truly available at any one time and this is why our carrier ambitions look less… Read more »

Dog
Dog
9 days ago
Reply to  Sean

We have no aircraft to go on it though 😂 an aircraft carrier with no aircraft, that’s difficult for people with no intelligence like me to comprehend, I’m sure there are intelligent people out there who can explane it though, see what I did there 😁👍

Steven Alfred Rake
Steven Alfred Rake
9 days ago
Reply to  Sean

People with any intelligence will be wondering why if we are going to operate the QE’s as LPH’s why did they put a sky ramp on them both and treated the decks with heat resistant paint at grate expense. The intelligence factor seems to have been missing when they ordered the 2 carriers but did not synchronise the ordering of aircraft to go on them. If they want to operate them as LPH’s that’s OK but they should have a flight of 35’s for the CAP and to support the troops ashore that would be an intelligent way of operating… Read more »

Geoff Roach
Geoff Roach
9 days ago

Here, here!

Jason
Jason
9 days ago

Grate?

Sean
Sean
9 days ago

People with intelligence realise that you can operate as one thing one week and another thing the following week. During the pandemic passenger aircraft were used as cargo freighters with cargo piled on seats. They didn’t tear the seats out only then to have to buy new ones when they returned to passenger service. I assume you thing a T23 should have it’s towed array removed when not sub-hunting too. 🤦🏻‍♂️ I think you’ll find Lockheed Martin are in charge of delivering F35s not the Carrier Alliance. But if you knew anything about the F35 you’d know why the U.K.… Read more »

Steven Alfred Rake
Steven Alfred Rake
9 days ago
Reply to  Sean

Passenger aircraft are not the focal point of a multi-national task force putting themselves in harms way, an aircraft carrier with no aircraft to defend itself or the other vessels in it’s task force is a liability. We have a 10% stake in the F35 programme, we were offered a bigger stake at the out set of the programme but the powers that be decided against this. Maybe if these so called intelligent people in charge of the UK’s defence procurement had a little forward planning we may have had a few more 35’s to play with. I might well… Read more »

Sean
Sean
9 days ago

You don’t need an education to grasp the concept of an analogy, which is what I was using with regard to passenger aircraft. 🤦🏻‍♂️ No we don’t have a 10% stake in the F35B programme, we have 13-15%. Trying googling figures first and you wouldn’t get so many facts wrong. We only have that much because we are the only Tier 1 partner, though Japan might ask for this in future given the large number they’ve now committed to buying. We were never offered more. If we had more F35Bs now, it would cost more long-term because all of our… Read more »

Steven Alfred Rake
Steven Alfred Rake
8 days ago
Reply to  Sean

Passenger aircraft are not asked to go into harms way so there is no real analogy. At the outset of the F35 programme we (the UK) was asked if we wanted to be part of the development team which would have given the UK a much larger stake in the programme, our intellectual elite declined happy to let the full development costs go to the Americans who now are happy to recover those costs from country’s like the UK. The UK is showboating the idea of STOVL for its carriers which is a continuation from the Invincible class and its… Read more »

Sean
Sean
8 days ago

Radakin is worth £235k more than you’ll ever be.

Steven Alfred Rake
Steven Alfred Rake
8 days ago
Reply to  Sean

You are probably right there, just wondering if that money could be better spent on recruiting more people into the navy so we could put more ships to sea,

RALPH
RALPH
4 days ago

Still not learned the lesson from the Falklands regarding lack of aircraft numbers lets hope we don’t get caught out again.

Steven Alfred Rake
Steven Alfred Rake
13 minutes ago
Reply to  RALPH

There is a lot we seem to have forgotten, lack of offensive capability for our surface fleet, lack of aircraft for our carriers with an over reliance on the RAF to be able to protect the fleet, lack of submarines, lack of personnel, lack of auxiliary’s but the most damming is the lack of foresight by the MoD and our politicians in failing to build of previous mistakes.

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
8 days ago
Reply to  Sean

BTW It is quite usual to take seats out of commercial planes to use them in a swing cargo role if the hold doesn’t bring it to weight capacity because the density of cargo is low.

The seats simply bolt into rails in the floor.

Alternatively the seats can be slid into groups positioned according to load out requirements.

The seats are stored and not thrown away!

Sean
Sean
8 days ago

I know but during the pandemic they didn’t even bother doing that, they simply stacked cargo on seats. Possibly they had nowhere to store all the seats had they removed them.

It was an analogy, a concept that some people it seems have difficulty grasping 🤷🏻‍♂️

OkamsRazor
OkamsRazor
9 days ago

SAR before questioning the intelligence of others perhaps you should inform yourself on the topics. There are very good reasons for the slow pace of F-35 purchases, which professionals and anyone paying attention is well aware of.

Steven Alfred Rake
Steven Alfred Rake
9 days ago
Reply to  OkamsRazor

Yes, we are all holding out for the Block IV to surface but in the mean time we have men and women at sea with very little offensive capability and an aircraft carrier with no fixed wing assets to defend it’s self or its escort is a liability.
If that is the extent of our professional elite’s thinking then maybe we should be changing the people at the top of the tree who get rather a lot of money to make these decisions.

OkamsRazor
OkamsRazor
9 days ago

As you acknowledge, we are holding out for Block IV F-35 upgrades and purchasing any more than the bare minimum in the interim would be un-professional. No our sailors are only endangered in video games, because we live in the real world, which is a NATO world and our Carrier Strike Groups (CSG) travel with NATO allies, including the Americans. And due to careful planning, over many years and brilliant execution when the CSG set sail last year, it sailed with the most potent air wing ever to set sail (with US Marine assets included) and the most powerful CSG… Read more »

Steven Alfred Rake
Steven Alfred Rake
8 days ago
Reply to  OkamsRazor

You are right to point out the success of last years QE deployment but if you are going to keep 2 carriers at sea we should have enough 35’s to protect them both. If that means we have twice as many aircraft to upgrade after the Block IV come out so be-it, after all, how many upgrades have the Typhoons had and yet we did not stop the delivery to wait for the latest version to enter service. The PoW is operating as the Nato flagship but dose not have a US or French Carrier CSG to escort her, yes… Read more »

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
8 days ago

The main limiting factor to intensive F35B use is pilots and maintainers being g qualified.

You can have as many airframes as you like but if you can’t fix/fly them they are pointless.

Steven Alfred Rake
Steven Alfred Rake
8 days ago

You are bang on, but who’s fault is that ? it take approximatly 5 to 7 years to train a fast jet pilot so we should have put forward a recruitment plan for pilot when we had a good idea of the requirements of the joint carrier force but yet again our intellectual elite have squandered the money away on god knows what!.

DMJ
DMJ
9 days ago
Reply to  Paul42

The French used Foch and Clemenceau in much the same way, one as a strike carrier and one as a helicopter carrier when both are operational, or so I recall

DMJ
DMJ
9 days ago
Reply to  DMJ

‘Were operational”

MJ
MJ
9 days ago
Reply to  Paul42

Nope, both are regular carriers but QE is the current fleet ready carrier so F-35Bs are reserved for it. POW will still be training with them. Eventually it will rotate around.

johan
johan
9 days ago
Reply to  Paul42

To keep it short, currently there are 14 F35b pilots within the System. 3 are still in the USA, as part of the training force.
11 based within the UK. 5 Pilots flew at the jubilee the rest are in the EU on operation Putin. we are short of pilots due to one thing and another, and it said the 2 Red Arrow pilots that keep dropping in and out are actually F35 pilots.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
9 days ago
Reply to  johan

6 mate. 😉 There were 6 F35 in the flypast.

Red Arrows pilots dropping in and out??

Bob.
Bob.
9 days ago

The Reds are flying as a seven ship this season other than for “special occasions”.

Bob.
Bob.
9 days ago
Reply to  johan

14 ☹

To think that the RAF once operated two airfields just for advanced combat training.

Levi Goldsteinberg
Levi Goldsteinberg
10 days ago

She’s operating as a command ship for NATO at the moment

Jon
Jon
10 days ago

None expected from the UK. I’m sure someone mentioned US tiltrotors, but there could be other planes cross-decking for practice.

Last edited 10 days ago by Jon
Sean
Sean
10 days ago

On this particular deployment, correct.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
9 days ago

They’re most probably being kept in storage to minimise the risk of damage to their stealth coating caused by moisture in the air (salt water). One of our actual resident experts Rfn Western explained this in some detail. Always better to play safe than to be sorry, It’s not a cheap fix after all! “Hi Guys, I happen to know a fair bit about this side of things. 7085 has extremely good resistance to corrosion. It can be treated with an enhanced annealing/ageing process that refines the grain boundaries and increase the presence of low-angle grain boundaries which are great… Read more »

Shocking-photos-US-F-35C-Lightning-II-jets-covered-in-rust-1.jpg
Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
9 days ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Do you even realise the guff you are copying and pasting?? Rust can cause many parts to fail?? who writes this stuff 🤣😬 Jesus Nigel, even you can do better than that. It’s a 5th gen fighter, not your dads old ford Escort.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
9 days ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

We should buy all 138 Delboy. Good idea Uncle Abert, then we can go into the scrap metal business and make a fortune! Lovely jubbly 😂 😂 “According to Pentagon spokesman Joe Dellavedova, the rust was caused by a manufacturing error by the arms manufacturer Lockheed Martin. And Lockheed Martin has promised that this problem will be solved in subsequent manufacturing, and they are confident that this problem will be solved. However, by 2022, everyone has seen what Lockheed Martin’s commitment will turn out to be. Not only has the problem of rust not been solved at all, but it… Read more »

download (1).jpeg
Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
8 days ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Just rinse it off with some Peckham Spring and it will all be cushty.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
8 days ago

Best solution 😆 Com’on Rodney we’ve got to get these F35s’ ship-shape 😂

download.jpeg
Last edited 8 days ago by Nigel Collins
Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
8 days ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Nigel – please try and understand that almost all RAM contains ferrite – something has got to do the energy conversion from radar RF -> other things.

The fact that ferrite – well – ‘rusts’ is just chemistry – I have a PhD in it.

I think someone was winding you up a bit.

I’m sure if you vac-pac any aircraft you could extend its storage life free of oxygen and moisture……

BTW most of what the RAM is in or incorporate into are composite panels which are not affected by electrochemical corrosion…

Last edited 8 days ago by Supportive Bloke
Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
8 days ago

Hi Supportive Bloke, I fully understand after reading up on the subject and confirmation from Rfn Western, try explaining it to Uncle Albert who clearly does not!

My concern is the cost of fixing it one and the damage to the stealth coating? An F22 had some peel off and enter the engine during the flight which almost caused the loss of the aircraft.

As for stealth?

Hope this finds you well.

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
8 days ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Ah That depends. On F22 the coating was post manufacture applied In the F35B my understanding is that it is part of the layup process. I have zero inside knowledge but there are various public statements that hunt as this. So with F35B there is an inert gel sprayed onto the mould followed by RAM/resin followed by the structural layup which probably has RAM incorporated into it. The issue can be things as simple as micro bubbles or abrasion if the outer sealing gel layer that would allow moisture to produce the appearance of ‘rust’ well it is rust but… Read more »

Lordtemplar
Lordtemplar
9 days ago

Yes, i read that the PoW had no RAF or US F35B onboard, but was wondering if Spanish Harriers were going to do some cross decking during NATO exercises. Maybe the Harriers are not top of the line nowadays, but working with allies in joint exercises is always a valuable experience. My 2 cents.
PS although Harriers are old gen, they would be still quite useful for CAS vs terrorist groups like ISIS etc… obviously not against Chinese or Russian jets

Cymbeline
Cymbeline
9 days ago
Reply to  Lordtemplar

I was reading up earlier and saw that at one point in the 70s China wanted to buy 200 Harriers from HMG. Glad that sale never went through.

Damo
Damo
9 days ago
Reply to  Cymbeline

Pressed the flag on this by accident and can’t seem to remove it. Sorry

Cymbeline
Cymbeline
9 days ago
Reply to  Damo

No problems, I often suffer from fat finger syndrome on these stupid phones.

Damo
Damo
9 days ago
Reply to  Cymbeline

It’s my one year old twatting me while I scroll through that caused it hahahaha. As well as tge fat fingers!

Cymbeline
Cymbeline
8 days ago
Reply to  Cymbeline

Actually that price is an average price over a period of time, todays price in $ is 8.60 or $125 to fill up your average family car. I’m sure it will get worse in Europe especially when they start importing less oil from Russia.

johan
johan
9 days ago
Reply to  Lordtemplar

Not approved to land, and is a huge step backwards, and Navy wont want to start a backlash over who scrapped our fleet and offend BAEs over there actions. Goverments cannot ground a airframe.

Keith Hitchman
Keith Hitchman
9 days ago
Reply to  Lordtemplar

It’s just a pity they scrapped our Harrier’s. They still could perform some decent stuff.

Dern
Dern
9 days ago
Reply to  Keith Hitchman

It would have been a choice between Harrier and Tornado. And if you look at what was needed from the RAF between 2010 and 2020, keeping Tornado was 100% the right choice.

Mr Bell
Mr Bell
9 days ago
Reply to  Lordtemplar

I don’t know, I reckon a late generation sea harrier FA2 would have given most current Russian Mig pilots a real headache- they were pretty decent fighters and had really great dog fighting ability coupled with their late radar set giving good medium range Air to Air ability when coupled with AMRAAM- at the time of their scrapping the sea harrier was at its very most capable. Besides which the Russian airforce has proven itself to be frankly shite in Ukraine and utterly incapable of offering a strategic air campaign or obtaining and maintaining air superiority. Something a NATO force… Read more »

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
9 days ago
Reply to  Mr Bell

The Sea Harrier FA2 had an awesome radar, awesome AMRAAM integration. The rest of it was seriously under developed. The GR7/9 was a far superior airframe

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
8 days ago
Reply to  Mr Bell

Ahem. Cameron did not scrap the Sea Harrier.

All 3 squadrons, 800, 801, 899 NAS were deleted by the previous Labour government, as we’re 3 and 4 Squadrons RAF with Harrier GR9, and their base at Cottesmore handed to the Army.

We keep seeing this myth that Tories, Cameron, Osborne put paid to the Harrier force. They did not and I won’t let it stand without a correction. It probably stems from the memories of the cut of Ark Royal.

Only 1 Squadron and 20R Sqn RAF remained when the axe fell in 2010, the rest had already gone.

Klonkie
Klonkie
7 days ago

Excellent, well put DM, The rot set in with the Blair 2003/4 “review” or more accurately cuts. That was the start, anyway.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
7 days ago
Reply to  Klonkie

Morning mate. Indeed. But that never suits the narritave for many, and people also forget. I don’t!! I used to have the same rants then as now on another forum. Interestingly, over the years when I remind/correct posters on who exactly cut what there is then deafening silence in reply. Gareth Ainsworth was the DS at the time, when defence was seen as so vital by Brown I recall the DS was double hatted as a minister for another department!🙄 I may be recalling a different DS there though. Johnson Beharry VC treated Brown the correct way by turning his… Read more »

Klonkie
Klonkie
6 days ago

Nicely put DM, couldn’t agree more with you , people do have short memories. Enjoy the the summer Surrey weather.

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
10 days ago
Reply to  Lordtemplar

I don’t think Spanish Harriers are PoW cleared?

What would the point be?

NATO, aggregated, has enough F35B: if needed.

Adding Harrier to the mix just makes things like logistics complicated.

In any case if Harrier projection was required Italy and Spain have worked up platforms. It *might* also be cleared for CdG but again having another platform would likely reduce operational tempo.

Watcherzero
Watcherzero
9 days ago

Italian Harriers landed on QE, not aware of any exercises with Spanish ones.

Dern
Dern
9 days ago
Reply to  Watcherzero

Do you have a link for that? I know Italian F-35’s landed on her, but haven’t heard anything about Harriers, would like to read.

Watcherzero
Watcherzero
9 days ago
Reply to  Dern

You may be right, looking back says Italian F-35B from the Cavour, and there is no mention of the US Harriers that acted as Aggressors during QE’s air defence certification in 2019 landing on her.

Sean
Sean
10 days ago
Reply to  Lordtemplar

Pointless as Harriers are museum pieces now.

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
9 days ago
Reply to  Sean

That is true(ish) too.

But would they out museum Mad Vlad’s museum pieces?

That is the question.

I suspect they have working secure NATO coms and precision navigation, laser guidance etc so on that basis alone would in fact be a lot better than Mad Vlad’s scrap heap challenge?

I don’t disagree that F35B is at a whole different level electronically never mind that fact it is stealthy and supersonic.

Sean
Sean
9 days ago

Still absolutely no point in having them onboard the QE given we have F35Bs 🤷🏻‍♂️

The Harriers moment of glory was 40 years ago. I certainly wouldn’t want to see them go up against the Russian Air Force’s best aircraft.

johan
johan
9 days ago
Reply to  Lordtemplar

Due to the age of the Harrier and its obsolete, cannot gain approval for landing on the QE Class, as it will cause the Pant wetter’s, to say we scarped them.
when only a Manufacture could ground a airframe.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
10 days ago

That’s interesting. A mate of mine I had a Kebab with last night reckoned he was in Pompey yesterday ( 9th June ) and both QECs were there according to him!? Is this article for an event from some days back and POW has now returned or was he telling porkies and doesn’t recognise a carrier from a frigate!!! 😂

Jon
Jon
9 days ago

You can look at the current status using a webcam on HMS Warrior. Also check harbour shipping movements.

I don’t know your friend, but I do know the most common reason I see double, and sometimes it’s also followed by a kebab.

Last edited 9 days ago by Jon
Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
9 days ago
Reply to  Jon

😆👍

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
9 days ago

It is about 2 1/2 days of steaming at a decent clip.

Assuming that she is going at about 25kts – she won’t go faster than that in peace time, unless launching heavily loaded aircraft, as it pushes fuel consumption right up.

william james crawford
william james crawford
9 days ago

I would not expect her to be steamed at more than 18 kts, unless there was something very pressing on…

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
9 days ago

With present oil prices….

Cymbeline
Cymbeline
9 days ago

I remember back in the 73/74 oil crisis things were really tight. The only vehicle allowed to leave our camp was the Duty Driver and then only for essential runs like picking up/dropping off messages to the Com Centre. I was also doing a B3 Signals course at the time and our field based work involved sitting in a circle outside the classroom shouting radio messages to each other. Obviously that situation revolved around fuel shortage rather than price.

Steve
Steve
9 days ago
Reply to  Cymbeline

Currrenty we don’t have a fuel crisis, there is pently of oil from other places available, the producers are just massively profiteering from things rather than easing their restrictions and allowing more oil onto the market, for example Saudi has the capability to supply many times what it does today but it restricts it for profit. Worst case we have plenty from domestic waters available to supply the UK for decades to come, just that would require a serious crisis for any government to force the issue.

Cymbeline
Cymbeline
9 days ago
Reply to  Steve

Absolutely, but higher prices can bring restrictions and if it keeps increasing it will start to creep into business and institutions. As for the oil, I know its in UK waters but its up to those companies that drill it where they sell it, they have other customers as well as UK PLC, so whilst we have oil we still might go short.

Steve
Steve
9 days ago
Reply to  Cymbeline

Yeah, I’m just frustrated with hearing it blamed on Russia in the media, it’s not, it’s down to profiteering thanks to the war and world governments letting them do it.

Gas is a different topic, as it’s in more short supply.

As for our waters, we can just ban the export if needed, and therefore force them to sell domestically, but yeah that would be restricted to extreme emergency senario.

Last edited 9 days ago by Steve
Sean
Sean
9 days ago
Reply to  Steve

It would need legalisation to ban the export of oil as the oil companies would launch a judicial review and sue the government for beach of contract. They’ve already bought and paid for licenses for those fields and to sell the oil to whoever they want.

Steve
Steve
9 days ago
Reply to  Sean

Yeah not suggesting doing it over this would need something far more extreme, but the government writes the law, so they don’t need to care about being sued as the court can only rule over whether something breaches the law, which is why legally all the covid threat happened, because the government was given ability to do it and therefore it was legal. Plus the oil company would be stupid to sue the government as they would kiss good bye to their licence to mine

Sean
Sean
9 days ago
Reply to  Steve

Wrong. We don’t live in a dictatorship like Russia, we have separation of powers. If the government had the powers you suggest the Supreme Court wouldn’t have been able to overrule Boris’ peroration of Parliament. Laws can be challenged as being unlawful, and decisions not covered by law can be challenged by judicial review. The government can’t just seize the licenses of oil companies that have bought them. The technical term for that is theft, and you won’t get any more foreign investment if you do that. Cuba is a good example of what happens when a country does that.… Read more »

eclipse
eclipse
9 days ago
Reply to  Sean

I don’t know why you are always so combative and rude when you participate in discussion, especially considering you depict yourself as always correct yet often poorly analysing situations and making errors. Everyone is entitled to making mistakes, regardless. Firstly, the Supreme Court in the U.K. is almost always on the side of the Government. Statistics show the proportion of cases lost by public bodies or the government has only decreased under the current presidency of the SC. Secondly, I think you’ll find that the government CAN seize licences… though that wouldn’t be necessary. All that is required is an… Read more »

Sean
Sean
9 days ago
Reply to  eclipse

Because that’s all idiots understand. Yes HMG wins most cases in the Supreme Court because they take expert legal advice to prevent them being dragged there. You also have idiots like the “Good Law Project” constantly taking cases to the SC and losing. The SC still has, and can, rule against HMG however. Imposing an export ban is not theft. If you bothered to read my comment before replying you would have seen that I said seizing licences is theft, which it is – unless you’re called Putin in which case it’s SOP. HMG can’t seize licenses. It would be… Read more »

Steve
Steve
9 days ago
Reply to  Sean

Incorrect, the courts do not have the power to overrule the government. Not how are government works. Only the house of lords can and even then all they can do is delay it. The court can only rule on whether an action is legal or not based on the law which the government is able to write and change at a whim, as seen my Patel adding hundreds of pages to the crime bill after it had been voted on my government, in that case the lord’s rightly threw it back under nice try mentality. We don’t have a dictatorship… Read more »

Last edited 9 days ago by Steve
Sean
Sean
9 days ago
Reply to  Steve

Wrong the courts can rule something is unlawful where no-law applies. The U.K. operates on a common-law principle.

Steve
Steve
8 days ago
Reply to  Sean

No they can’t. The idea of civil style law is that everything is effectively illegal and there needs to be a law in place to make it legal, We operate on the reverse, everything is legal unless there is a law, which is common law. The idea of common law is that the court intreprets the underlying regulation and that intretration then applies to all lower courts, so effectively they can extend the legilation by intrepreting what it is intended to achieve, but they can’t write the legisalation. It can not therefore intrepret something if there is no law in… Read more »

Sean
Sean
8 days ago
Reply to  Steve

Plain and simply wrong, even someone with no legal expertise would know that simply by following the news 🤷🏻‍♂️

Steve
Steve
8 days ago
Reply to  Sean

I would suggest reading up on how the government and constitution of the UK works, its surprising how many people don’t understand how the law works in their own country. If you need a basic proof of this think about legal loop holes, they are used every day to get people off, because the legislation written by government said slightly the wrong thing, the courts are powerless to convict, if they could enforce stuff not in law, loopholes wouldnt’ work. If the courts could overrule the goverment, we wouldn’t live in a democracy as the law would not be drafted… Read more »

Cymbeline
Cymbeline
9 days ago
Reply to  Steve

Those other OPEC countries could just pick up the slack if they chose as you say its all about the dollar. Just wait till they run out of fresh water thats what I say.

Matt
Matt
9 days ago
Reply to  Steve

AIUI we can’t.

Oil is not universally fungible.

Chris
Chris
9 days ago
Reply to  Steve

Just to add to that, oil prices have come down considerably recently but the prices of refined products have increased by over 300%. The refineries are selling to places like America where local taxes are lower than our VAT at increasing levels further pushing up our forecourt prices.

eclipse
eclipse
9 days ago
Reply to  Chris

I can tell you that prices here in LA are not any lower than your own. We’re pushing 8 dollars now and large cities in Texas are nearing the mid 6s. Any country where there is demand for oil will have exorbitantly high prices.

Cymbeline
Cymbeline
8 days ago
Reply to  eclipse

The average price for a gallon of petrol in dollars here in the UK is $8.324

Jon
Jon
5 days ago
Reply to  Cymbeline

In the US, a gallon is 3.785 liters. In the UK, it’s 4.546 litres. I hope you remembered to account for that.

Martin
Martin
9 days ago

https://youtu.be/N6qPQ4fs84g

Only Queen Elizabeth alongside (live camera)

Phil the Fuel
Phil the Fuel
9 days ago

4 hours ago QEC was on her own cross the harbour from me. Has been that way since the end of last month. POW sailed QE came in next day.

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
9 days ago
Reply to  Phil the Fuel

Thanks. My mate must be v confused.

Phil the Fuel
Phil the Fuel
9 days ago

1 of our American cousins will be in port tomorrow for a quick pit stop. While in she will be tied up behind QEC, busy day ahead.

Frank62
Frank62
9 days ago

Only QE has been in Portsmouth for at least a week or so.

Glen Harrison
Glen Harrison
9 days ago

It’s a pity they weren’t built with catapult and arrester wires surly they would have been far more useful

Jay R
Jay R
9 days ago

Good to see. Global Britain. A total waste of taxpayers money. The UK, like Germany, Holland, Sweden, Canada, Belgium, has no need for an aircraft carrier. Why persist. QE2 are glorified thru deck cruisers. A proper carrier has cats and traps, nuclear power, AAR capability, fixed wing aew. F35B is too short ranged, has no air capability from the ship. Aew is a post Falklands idea. No anti ship missiles. Or am I missing something

David Steeper
David Steeper
9 days ago
Reply to  Jay R

Why are you on this site ? Am I missing something ?

Andrew
Andrew
9 days ago
Reply to  Jay R

You are….

Daniele Mandelli
Daniele Mandelli
9 days ago
Reply to  Jay R

😳

Sean
Sean
9 days ago
Reply to  Jay R

You probably complain our ships lack 15” inch guns… 🤦🏻‍♂️

EVERY navy that can afford to us building carriers, or looking at operating their helicopter carriers with F35Bs. I think that assembled brass knows more about naval ward than yourself.

“A proper carrier has cats and traps, nuclear power” – so basically nobody has ever operated a carrier except for the Yanks and the French…., 🤣😂🤣😂🤣😂

“Or am I missing something” – yes, a brain.

Dern
Dern
9 days ago
Reply to  Sean

Maybe his paycheck in rubles?

Sean
Sean
9 days ago
Reply to  Dern

The Russians must be desperate if they’re paying people to post that kind of deranged drivel… 😆

Jon
Jon
5 days ago
Reply to  Sean

All our able seaman pack 15″ guns, and the uniforms fit accordingly.

OkamsRazor
OkamsRazor
9 days ago
Reply to  Jay R

JR some people should stick to commenting on what they know otherwise they appear devoid of intelligence.

Mr Bell
Mr Bell
9 days ago
Reply to  Jay R

you seem to be missing a rather lot Jay R
Too much to actually be bothered to give you a reasonably detailed reply.
Why don’t you go away and do some research and maybe actually learn the subject matter you are commenting on?

Tams
Tams
9 days ago
Reply to  Jay R

Too much of coward to come back and re0ly to anyone?

Jay R
Jay R
9 days ago
Reply to  Tams

No, only kidding, that’s all. The QE2 carriers are actually quite advanced and way more flexible than CATOBAR carriers. 2 is the right number, and non nuclear power makes them simpler. The Merlin Crownset system is more than adequate. The F35B range is also double that of the AV8B. The original post was just to get a reaction, testing how patriotic you all are.

Andrew
Andrew
8 days ago
Reply to  Jay R

Think your on the wrong forum for telling jokes Jay…perhaps you should join a forum more suited to your level….

Jay R
Jay R
8 days ago
Reply to  Andrew

Whatever

johan
johan
9 days ago

Next stop Gibraltar and see if the Spanish fancy a little drive thru the UK Waters with her sat there.

Mr Bell
Mr Bell
9 days ago
Reply to  johan

We need a modern day HMS Thunderchild for Gibs defence duties- ramming speed required.

David S
David S
9 days ago

The timing would appear to be to coincide with 40 anniversary of Spain joining NATO. Turkey has illustrated the veto of new NATO members that existing members hold; it does make me wonder how and why it came to pass that somehow the UK thought a veto was not appropriate mere weeks after Spain had wined, dined and treated like heroes, a group of Argentinians who had sought to attack Royal Navy ships in Gibraltar. I don’t think the Falkland islands was a NATO issue, but accepting as a member a country that was as close to an active ally… Read more »

Bill
Bill
9 days ago

Our Spanish allies indeed! With friends like these….

Tommo
Tommo
8 days ago

Slightly, of post , just remembering those Lads from HMS Glamorgan I’m old now they are forever young 12061982 another Pompey boat Gone but not Forgotten

David Steeper
David Steeper
8 days ago
Reply to  Tommo

👍

Tommo
Tommo
7 days ago
Reply to  David Steeper

Cheers David

Knight7572
Knight7572
7 days ago

considering HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Prince of Wales are the largest Aircraft Carriers ever built for a European Naval Power, that should say something

Here’s something to think about
The French PA2 design could be seen as what might have been for what the Queen-Elizabeths might have looked like if the Royal Navy had got CVA-01 in the early 1970s and was building their replacement, likely with a parallel deck design

Mr Bell
Mr Bell
6 days ago
Reply to  Knight7572

I like the PA2 design. Not sure naval group can build it for the 6 billion Euro budget when Ford cost equivalent to 15 billion and the new PA2 design is a slightly shrunken Ford. Emals, 2 lifts, nuclear power etc

Jon
Jon
5 days ago
Reply to  Mr Bell

I don’t think PA2 was ever going to be nuclear, unlike PANG. Are you confusing the two, or am I?