HMS Queen Elizabeth will now complete a period of operational sea training.

The vessel departed Portsmouth yesterday in order to complete ‘Fleet Operational Sea Training’ or ‘FOST’.

HMS Queen Elizabeth is one of the most powerful vessels ever constructed for the Royal Navy and is capable of carrying up to 40 aircraft.

The Royal Navy say here that the ship’s two propellers weigh 33 tonnes each. The powerplant behind them generates enough power to run 1000 family cars.

What is FOST?

According to the Royal Navy here:

“From the Naval Bases at Portsmouth, Plymouth, the Clyde in Scotland and a small team at Northwood in Middlesex, Fleet Operational Sea Training (FOST) provides training for all surface ships, submarines, Royal Fleet Auxiliaries and Strike Groups of the Royal Navy by a dedicated team of experts, led by Commander Fleet Operational Sea Training (COM FOST).

Together with land and air units and with increasing numbers of NATO and foreign participants conducting training under its guidance, FOST has established and maintains a worldwide reputation for excellence.”

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Geoff Roach
Geoff Roach
4 days ago

Most powerful vessel plus thirty plus F35 and associated support equals powerful warship, otherwise???

Tim
Tim
3 days ago
Reply to  Geoff Roach

Don’t forget all the weetabix on board!

Geoff Roach
Geoff Roach
3 days ago
Reply to  Tim

Hi Tim…this F35 story has been going on for so long they could turn into a cereal! 😂

David Flandry
David Flandry
3 days ago
Reply to  Geoff Roach

🤓

Darren hall
Darren hall
3 days ago
Reply to  Geoff Roach

Perhaps they mean the engines?

Geoff Roach
Geoff Roach
3 days ago
Reply to  Darren hall

BRRRRRRMMM!😉

Mark B
Mark B
3 days ago
Reply to  Geoff Roach

To be fair it is powerful because it is capable of carrying and delivering powerful weapons. That is the nature of a deterent. If you have to use it it is perhaps less powerful. 😀 It will be nice when we have more F35s & drones though.

Andy reeves
Andy reeves
3 days ago
Reply to  Mark B

And a full compliment of Asw Merlin’s on board as well.

Geoff Roach
Geoff Roach
3 days ago
Reply to  Mark B

Absolutely correct.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
3 days ago
Reply to  Geoff Roach

I think this gives us a good overview of the current problems facing the F-35 programme. Follow the links highlighted in blue for a more in-depth assessment. https://www.pogo.org/analysis/2022/03/f-35-program-stagnated-in-2021-but-dod-testing-office-hiding-full-extent-of-problem/ The F-35 Joint Strike Fighter program appears to be in a state of suspended development, with little progress made in 2021 toward improving its lacklustre performance. The latest report by the Pentagon’s Director, Operational Test & Evaluation (DOT&E) reveals stagnation and even backsliding in some fleet reliability measures. And that’s just the public DOT&E report. In an unprecedented move, DOT&E is concealing many of the key details of the F-35’s poor performance. For… Read more »

Last edited 3 days ago by Nigel Collins
Geoff Roach
Geoff Roach
3 days ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Well, Nigel….what a read. There is an old saying…”lies, damn lies and statistics” or something close. These two reports have it all. What a mess. I’ve been pressing for us to get a move on with orders but if half of each of these reports is true (who knows where the truth lies) you have to wonder whether we should be looking at alternatives, at least for the RAF.
I’m a bit limited for time today but will have another read tomorrow. Thanks for the tip.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
3 days ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Your welcome! And as I mentioned in an earlier thread. First flown on 11.06.2008 Clearly, they will have to take into account the Block 4 upgrade (2029) and the cost of upgrading the engine. An odd way to describe the F-35B by Air Marshal Knighton. I’m beginning to understand why. “If you want rough numbers, about 15 of them will be in maintenance, but as I said, that will evolve as we understand more about how we maintain this thing and how long it takes.” F135 engine upgrade best choice for F-35, says Raytheon Technologies boss  “Everybody understands that you’re going… Read more »

Andy reeves
Andy reeves
3 days ago
Reply to  Geoff Roach

And apart from f 35 and Merlin ASW, nothing to defend itself with (joke).

Mr Mark Franks
Mr Mark Franks
4 days ago

More Fost training? There must have been a huge change of crew I thought QE was combat ready or is the fact we have not embarked a Squadron of F35bs since CSG21 all is now a bit rusty?

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
4 days ago
Reply to  Mr Mark Franks

Or maybe FOST is viewed as being very important and needed to test some changes made to the ship. Particularly given the heightened tensions?

Mark franks
Mark franks
4 days ago

Supportive bloke. The ships received upgraded software recently and much of this training are carried out on simulators. Maybe Flag officer training is at a loose end. When are we going to have a continuous at sea carrier with a wing of F35s ready to go at a moments notice? This is not a criticism by any means, the QEs we’re built as intended to project british air power around the globe. I have said in previous posts months ago that we should be watching China, Iran and North Korea closely since the invasion of Ukraine and as part of… Read more »

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
4 days ago
Reply to  Mark franks

I was aware that there was due a network upgraded – this was announced a long while back. This will probably have meant replacing all of the network switches and some cabling to bring it up to 10Gb spine. So I can understand why that needs a shakeout.

Mark franks
Mark franks
4 days ago

I was aware the data networks,cabling and Giga data were already built in for upgrades.
This includes data traffic for the use and control of autonomous vehicles and real time istar.

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
4 days ago
Reply to  Mark franks

When QEC was designed it wasn’t all 1Gb…..in fact I don’t think any of it was!

The links between the switches will have needed an upgrade too as they were probably CAT5e and would have needed to be CAT7e or full fibre.

Mark franks
Mark franks
4 days ago

Interesting, so POW will have to go through the same shakedown and she has only just returned from excersise in the Arctic.

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
4 days ago
Reply to  Mark franks

MOD stopped giving that sort of detail out, in public view, a good few years back.

Given how much later POW was built it might well have been baked in from the start.

It was public that improvements were made from QEC to POW.

Andy reeves
Andy reeves
3 days ago

The navy bangs up its own costs with uncoordinated time in dock for all the fleet

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
3 days ago
Reply to  Andy reeves

NaB might have input but I think time in dock is now very, very carefully costed.

The old days of it being a bit random according to an Admiral’s whim and are long gone.

Last edited 3 days ago by Supportive Bloke
Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
4 days ago
Reply to  Mark franks

And quite rightly so.

Wednesday 4 May 2022 07:37, UK

“North Korea fires ballistic missile into sea off its east coast, says Japan and South Korea
Pyongyang has recently stepped up weapons tests, resuming long-range missile launches for first time since 2017 in March. Officials in Seoul and Washington say it may also be preparing for a new round of nuclear tests.”

https://news.sky.com/story/north-korea-fires-ballistic-missile-into-sea-off-its-east-coast-says-japan-and-south-korea-12605080

Last edited 4 days ago by Nigel Collins
Mark franks
Mark franks
4 days ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

It’s a pity the RAF have lost its nuke sniffers. The last time NK let one off was in 2006 and I ended up in Kadena afb Okinawa.

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker
3 days ago
Reply to  Mark franks

Can the nuke sniffer parts not be fitted to any plane? I thought they were only installed on the vc10 when required. North korea couldn’t give a flying fudge if the Royal Navy sail near by. They’re concern is South Korea, Japan, USA as it should be. Also keeping China and Russia as friends may be a concern. At these times I’m much happier the Royal Navy being nearer to home able to deploy at short notice. The U.K. forces just aren’t able to be world wide. Just don’t have the numbers. While they can deploy world wide they can’t… Read more »

Mark franks
Mark franks
3 days ago
Reply to  Monkey spanker

Tell that to UK government, we are committed to our allies in the South China Sea and Pacific regions that is what csg 21 was all about. The kit cannot be fitted to any other aircraft as there was no plan to do so and its another capability lost.

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker
3 days ago
Reply to  Mark franks

I’m not sure what the nuke sniffer sensors are now. In the past I thought it was basically a particle collector you open when ur where u want to be. Let the air pass through it and look at what particles it’s collected when on the ground.
Ahh the VC10. Loved the look of those aircraft.

Nigel Collins
Nigel Collins
3 days ago
Reply to  Mark franks

lol, The US Boeing WC-135 is very busy flying sorties out of Mildenhall I’ve been told.

A day reeves
A day reeves
3 days ago
Reply to  Nigel Collins

Except all those admirals are now at desks in the admiralty

Robert Blay.
Robert Blay.
3 days ago
Reply to  Mark franks

FOST training is one of the reason’s why the RN is so highly regarded around the world. The USN 7th fleet also is a pretty good deterrent in that part of the world.

Mark franks
Mark franks
3 days ago
Reply to  Robert Blay.

Fost is extremely and high intensity to get any ship and crew deployed for combat and is highly regarded but that wasn’t the point I was making.

Graham
Graham
3 days ago
Reply to  Mark franks

I don’t think it was ever envisaged that we would have one carrier continuously at sea with a full air wing. Has WW3 started? If that was the intention we should have bought 3 or 4 and provided the crews for all of them. I recall it being said that we should have 70% chance of one carrier being deployable with a 2 carrier purchase, overall, over the life of the carriers.

Andy reeves
Andy reeves
3 days ago
Reply to  Mark franks

I’ve said before that I don’t think either of the carrier’s should ever put so sea without escorts and f 35b already loaded. Far too important for them to just bimble out of Pompey for operational needs empty, may as well paint the Gosport ferry grey and stick a cardboard aircraft on it QEAandPOW are not frigates who simply put to sea and embark their chopper from culdrose when in range this isn’t the way anyone else would do this an American carrier doesn’t sail without the rest of its escort group with it. We’re not China or India, we… Read more »

Graham
Graham
3 days ago
Reply to  Mr Mark Franks

Don’t know much about FOST training but in the army you were always training and much of that was observed by ‘higher formation’. In Cold War times NATO would periodically deploy an Operational Readiness Team to see how quickly and well your unit could crash out of barracks on Exercise Active Edge. In BATUS training, BG exercises were very closely observed and Reports written; more than one CO’S career was written off due to a bad BATUS report so I was told.

Ian Jennings
Ian Jennings
3 days ago
Reply to  Graham

FOST was known as Flag Officer Sea Training based at Portland during my time in the RN in the 50/60s

andy reeves
andy reeves
10 seconds ago
Reply to  Ian Jennings

I’ll never forget one FOST I went through especially when some wag thought it would be a laugh to tape a couple of tins together and paint the WORD BOMB on it and then when the ship was called. To emergency stations he had vanish! If you’re reading this Paul Simpsoni wouldn’t have told anyone that it was you..

maurice10
maurice10
4 days ago

With Monday looming I can see a number of so-called exercises being used to cover what can only be a build-up to war? The burning question is, are the QE Class safer at sea than in port if the balloon goes up? The prospect of a limited exchange can not be ruled out between Russia and NATO, plus the fact, the UK has been waving its flag viciously at Putin in recent weeks, which could result in a demonstration of power from him against just the UK? A bit like driving a brilliant yellow sports car too fast on a… Read more »

Ben B
Ben B
4 days ago
Reply to  maurice10

Russian Forces are stretched trying to invade a smaller neighbour, with a Second rate (at best) armed forces. I somewhat doubt the Russians would attempt even a limited strike against NATO, and if they did they would regret it.

maurice10
maurice10
4 days ago
Reply to  Ben B

I’m not talking about a land action as you are correct about limited options there. No, it’s a sea-launched threat that may be the most likely scenario. Today Putin is suggesting a step up in attacks on Ukrainian supply lines to help slow down new weapons from the West.

The Artist Formerly Known As Los Pollos Chicken
The Artist Formerly Known As Los Pollos Chicken
4 days ago
Reply to  Ben B

Aye a second rate armed forces with massive support in intel and who knows what else from the US of A . The US are running the show in Ukraine not Ukraine it’s blatantly obvious for everyone to see.

and the killing death destruction and misery goes on all cheered for by the call of duty crowd in here it’s a sad sad state of affairs.

🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿🇬🇧

Deep32
Deep32
3 days ago

Have the US not been involved since 2014, possibly even earlier?

The Artist Formerly Known As Los Pollos Chicken
The Artist Formerly Known As Los Pollos Chicken
3 days ago
Reply to  Deep32

Aye the US have been involved heavily since then and since it was down to them the Democratically elected gov was ousted in 2013/14 in their regime change operation leading to all this shit. Meanwhile the Western media look the other way as the nice Ukrainian regime sanction a campaign of kidnap torture and assassination of any Ukrainian official or lawmaker engaged in de-escalation talks with Russia ( aimed at sparing the local population from death and misery) who they accuse of collaborating with Russia. Aye this war is being used as an excuse by the “good guys”to disappear, torture… Read more »

Mark franks
Mark franks
4 days ago
Reply to  maurice10

It’s payback for the polonium and Novochok poisonings, an act of war in all but name. Why keep the carriers in port? They were built for a reason, a carrier deployed east of Suez and let’s face it we have already built port facilities in Barhain, Oman and not forgetting the facility in Singapore for this very reason. Carriers are not going to be that useful in the Ukrainian confrontation it would be rather silly to put put a carrier in the Black Sea. The danger is this situation could expand further afield. Force protection and deterrence. Murice I see… Read more »

maurice10
maurice10
4 days ago
Reply to  Mark franks

Sadly our carriers are vulnerable wherever they are operating. US and French nuclear subs in Scotland could be construed as unusual? 8000 British troops and 72 CH2’s deployed on exercise in Europe, could be more than a preplanned operation? I’m surprised by the apparent lack of urgency in terms of some sort of civil defence announcements. Apart from frightening the nation should the Government be making some plans public? In the 1950’s civil defence exercises were commonplace and you would see the Columns moving around the roads. I do know that much of that infrastructure has gone, but something should… Read more »

David
David
4 days ago
Reply to  maurice10

“Much of that infrastructure has gone”. No, it has all gone. At the current time there is not even a warning system: the sirens and the system that drove them have all gone and the mobile phone based replacement is held up thanks to a funding argument between the MoD and the HO……

Graham
Graham
3 days ago
Reply to  David

True. All dismantled with unseemly haste in the early 90s to achieve a peace dividend. Infrastructure and organisations cannot be rebuilt quickly and would require billions of pounds.

Mark franks
Mark franks
4 days ago
Reply to  maurice10

It’s common curtsey and to avoid any misunderstanding that NATO informs the Russians that excersise and planned or are taking place. The Russians are fully aware that NATO is reinforcing It’s northern flank. If we were building up to war there would be a general mobilisation. That in a nutshell would be seen as a direct threat. As for the carriers as I have said we must be prepared for the possibility of the threats from China, Iran and North Korea. Civil defence in the 50s and the attitude of the populous is very different to today’s. It was also… Read more »

Graham
Graham
3 days ago
Reply to  Mark franks

I know that we did not invest in mass public shelters as the Americans did but the below ground bunkers for seats of regional government etc surely offered very good protection. Not every site was likely to receive a massive nuclear attack. Some were actually secret.

Tommo
Tommo
3 days ago
Reply to  Graham

Graham all the ROTOR Bunkers built in the 50ts and 60ts and other regional Bunkers were sold off one in Wiltshire was found to have been converted into a Cannibis factory if you go on you tube there’s a whole array of videos with urban explorers visiting around the UK now disused Bunkers alot had been RAF then handed to Regional government as provincial Hqs for the Cold War in Hindsight not a good idea as what is happening now has made us aware of how unstable situations thousands of miles away can have repercussions here

Graham Moore
Graham Moore
2 days ago
Reply to  Tommo

Hi Tommo,
When I lived in East Anglia, a popular tourist attraction was ‘the Secret Bunker’ at Kelvedon Hatch. Yes, certainly aware that everything has gone except the bunker for national government. All binned with indecent haste – and ROC and UKWMO disbanded too. I thought it was wildly optimistic at the time – NATO, bulwark against Soviet/Russian adventurism in Europe’ remained, sensibly.

Jonathan
Jonathan
3 days ago
Reply to  Graham

It’s not so much that Graham, it’s not the initial blasts that will kill everyone. It will be the lack of food and starvation that will effectively kill everyone. There is no way around that, 100 nuclear weapons will effectively remove 10% of the worlds food supply for a decade, thousands of nuclear weapons mean we will not be growing any food crops for a decade. You may get a few hunter gatherer societies that hang on but that will be because they are aready able to live in that way. But in all probably the human race will go… Read more »

JamesD
JamesD
4 days ago
Reply to  maurice10

Nothing unusual about us/fr subs in faslane nor the exercises even if they seem larger than in the recent past, not surprising given what’s happening, but we used to be able commit a lot more. Also it’s not the 50s anymore and I doubt this generation would pay much attention

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker
3 days ago
Reply to  maurice10

I don’t think civil defence for nuclear strikes is practiced as it was found to be pretty pointless when the hydrogen bomb arrived. I remember they did an exercise back in the 70/80s as to how effective civil defence would be. I think I got stopped early and the results hidden as it was terrible.

Graham
Graham
3 days ago
Reply to  Monkey spanker

A lot depended on the yield of the weapon, whether it was ground burst or air burst and whether the thing actually landed near you. There was a strange fallacy that every inhabited area of the country would be hit by nuclear weapons and that most of the population would be killed. That was never the case. Many would have survived. The advice in ‘Protect and Survive’ was widely mocked but was useful and practical and may save your life in the event of a near miss. The ROF and UKWMO were efficient and well equipped and run and would… Read more »

Sean
Sean
3 days ago
Reply to  maurice10

All carriers are vulnerable, indeed everything in wartime is vulnerable, that is the nature of war. But we aren’t at war and unless Putin really loses his marbles he won’t provoke a war with NATO. Instead like the bully he is, he’ll make threats to one and all but will only ever actually pick on guys smaller than him.

Graham
Graham
3 days ago
Reply to  maurice10

No British government would warn the population of impending war involving the homeland unless it was highly likely, much less attempt to recreate Civil Defence, a nigh impossible task to achieve quickly and effectively. CD is all gone and has been since the early 90s.

Mr Bell
Mr Bell
4 days ago
Reply to  maurice10

Agree NATO I’m sure are on their guard but they should probably ensure maximum deployed effort short of warfare before the Russians do something stupid to celebrate their 9th May victory day parade.

Its going to be a hollowed out victory day parade in Red square. Most of Russia’s best combat units and equipment are either engaged in the war in Ukraine or have been destroyed in that war. Chances of an unhinged Putin delivering something he can call a victory….minimum.

maurice10
maurice10
3 days ago
Reply to  Mr Bell

Let us hope so and I’m sure Putin will be behind bulletproof screens!

Quentin Drury
Quentin Drury
3 days ago
Reply to  maurice10

Maybe the viewing platform floor might conveniently collapse…

Sean
Sean
3 days ago
Reply to  maurice10

“ the UK has been waving its flag viciously at Putin”…

How does someone wave a flag “viciously”?… 🤷🏻‍♂️

If Putin does decide to ‘have a go’ it’ll be at something below what would trigger Article 5… though given Russia’s recent performance the U.K. might not need its NATI allies to defeat Russia! 😆

So something ‘non kinetic’ such as a cyber attack. Or maybe some FSB agents with some more polonium/Novichok? The danger to Putin is that anything like this is likely to result in even more weapons going from the U.K. to Ukraine.

Graham
Graham
3 days ago
Reply to  Sean

A further political danger to Putin is Finland and Sweden joining NATO.

Jon
Jon
3 days ago
Reply to  Sean

Underwater cables again, degrading the Internet? They’ve been practising that.

maurice10
maurice10
3 days ago
Reply to  Sean

It’s my blasted spell checker, read vigorously.🙂

Graham
Graham
3 days ago
Reply to  maurice10

NATO will only go to war with Russia if Russia invades or attacks a NATO country. Surely that has been said many times?

Frank62
Frank62
3 days ago
Reply to  maurice10

Definately safer at sea under escort & harder to find, track or target. In port they’re safe from sub torpedo attacks but the Russians know exactly where they are; an easy target for missile strike.

Tommo
Tommo
4 days ago

Just putting a little note ,Remembering D80 Hms Sheffield 40yrs how time has slipped through my fingers like Sand I’m old now those lads are forever young your not forgotten

Mark franks
Mark franks
4 days ago
Reply to  Tommo

Never forgotten.

Tommo
Tommo
4 days ago
Reply to  Mark franks

👍👍👍

Ianbuk
Ianbuk
4 days ago
Reply to  Tommo

Not forgotten. God bless them all.

Tommo
Tommo
4 days ago
Reply to  Ianbuk

👍👍👍

Jay R
Jay R
3 days ago
Reply to  Tommo

Utter respect.

Tommo
Tommo
3 days ago
Reply to  Jay R

👍👍👍

Geoff Roach
Geoff Roach
3 days ago
Reply to  Tommo

God bless them all and many, many others.

Quentin Drury
Quentin Drury
3 days ago
Reply to  Geoff Roach

And the same from us down here too. 🇦🇺 🇳🇿 🇬🇧

Tommo
Tommo
3 days ago
Reply to  Quentin Drury

👍👍👍

AlbertStarburst
AlbertStarburst
3 days ago
Reply to  Tommo

Big respect to all. We shall remember them.

Tommo
Tommo
3 days ago

👍👍👍

Tommo
Tommo
3 days ago

👍👍👍thanks

Tommo
Tommo
4 days ago

It’s just routine after BOST , any vessels of the RN will go one to COST all implemented by FOST , COST ensures that what was learnt during BOST is keeped in practise and crews are all learning even new drafties COST irons out the creases

Supportive Bloke
Supportive Bloke
4 days ago
Reply to  Tommo

Very well put.

Tommo
Tommo
4 days ago

Cheers,SB I no longer have to don Anti flash when the doorbell rings

ChariotRider
ChariotRider
4 days ago
Reply to  Tommo

OK Tommo,

I’ve got to ask – COST means ??? Continuation Operational Sea Training ???

I found out what CORSAIR means in UK mil speak, Communter Output for REME Support of AIRcraft but COST wasn’t listed. Not the first time an acronym I needed wasn’t listed either 🤔

Cheers CR
PS That post looked like a round in Pointless 🙂

Last edited 4 days ago by ChariotRider
Grizzler
Grizzler
4 days ago
Reply to  ChariotRider

Welll it LOST me anyway…

Tommo
Tommo
4 days ago
Reply to  ChariotRider

Spot on Chariotrider, Basic operational Sea Training ,Continuationsl Operational Sea Training Pissed Off Sea Training when you’ve got too do it again 😀

Monkey spanker
Monkey spanker
3 days ago
Reply to  Tommo

Got to keep current. People come and go so got to keep training at maximum level. We are seeing what bad training brings with Russians just now.

Tommo
Tommo
3 days ago
Reply to  Monkey spanker

Monkey spanker, FOST learnt alot after our 74 days down south ,too ensure that what had happened wouldn’t happen again , the Lads who had been through hell and had experience would often have right set too with the Portland Fost Staff but that’s how we grew you can’t be wrapped in cottonwool when your Home and your Oppos are burning around you , Fight or Flight , flight is not an option when at sea

Klonkie
Klonkie
3 days ago

Greetings All

Of topic but relevant, 40 years ago today HMS Sheffield was sunk by Exocet with a loss of 20 souls.

Quentin D63
Quentin D63
3 days ago
Reply to  Klonkie

Greetings Klonkie, I think there’s a new T26 HMS Sheffield to carry on the name which will be a living reminder. Saw a photo on twitter the other day showing the 20 CAMM, 2×6+2×4, configuration on your two Anzac frigates. Curious as to why NZ didn’t go for the quad CAMM, 6×4 as the Canadian’s have on their T26s? I’m sure it’s been brought up before but if someone can remind me, was it a cost, weight, ease of operation reason? I wonder too with the Chinese encroachment into Solomons/Kirribati if your frigates/P-8s might get some NSM/JSMs as the RAN/RAAF… Read more »

Frank62
Frank62
3 days ago
Reply to  Quentin D63

A squadron of fighter jets wouldn’t go amiss for NZ either. They’ve nothing to intercept anything at the moment.

Klonkie
Klonkie
2 days ago
Reply to  Frank62

You have my vote Frank . Dumbest move by the Helen Clark government removing the RNZAF combat wing circa 2000. But, according to Helen (I’m paraphrasing) “We live in a benign environment in the South Pacific with no perceived threat” .

Oh God, give me strength!

Klonkie
Klonkie
2 days ago
Reply to  Quentin D63

Hi Quentin. Good valid points you raise. I think NZ’s informal defence policy is to lean our our big strong cousins across the ditch! Seriously though, I do know there is interest in drone UAV tech in the RNZAF. l doubt it would be anything like the the Global Hawk RAAF is receiving though. On the plus side, our first P8 should be in service in 2024. I’m keen to see the shape of RNZN future frigate(all two of them). I suspect it’s likely to be in a similar class of the Type 31, alas no Type 26 for us!.… Read more »

Tommo
Tommo
3 days ago
Reply to  Klonkie

👍👍👍 cheers Klonkie

Klonkie
Klonkie
2 days ago
Reply to  Tommo

Hi Tommo. So sorry Mate, I see you posted exactly the same thing before me so apologies for doubling up. I’ve been reflecting a lot on the Falkland’s campaign re the 40th anniversary.

I do think it was a shame the Simonstown accord had been dissolved . It would have been useful for the RN to access the modern and extended dockyard. I doubt if the UK asked or if the SA government offered. Anyhow, politics of the day I guess.

Tommo
Tommo
2 days ago
Reply to  Klonkie

That’s alright Klonkie, at least you put a post up for those lads still on patrol , like I put I’m Old now they will be forever young One little dit about Simonstown or South Africa was the Task force got lost in a fog bank ,when it clear we could see Tabletop mountain Cape Town and HMS Invicible was already there as South African Gaurd Ship for the whole of the Conflict But at the time of OP Corporate Britian didn’t want too be seen as giving Apartheid government any Kudos i f they had offered their dockyard amenities… Read more »

Klonkie
Klonkie
1 day ago
Reply to  Tommo

It’s a good point Tommo. The SA government would have tried to milk it for all it’s worth. So politically theUK did the right thing .

Tommo
Tommo
1 day ago
Reply to  Klonkie

👍,cheers Klonkie

Ian
Ian
3 days ago

At the risk of being pedantic- the ship is capable of carrying considerably more than 40 aircraft. The limit of ’40’ is set by the operating concept not the physical capacity.

Tommo
Tommo
3 days ago
Reply to  Ian

Ssßh your have the Health and Safety executive snooping around Air Arm by law are only permitted too work 8 hrs a day thanks too health and safety

David Flandry
David Flandry
3 days ago

Sigh… Aircraft carriers have NO power of their own, it’s all in the air wing, which in this case is too small. No doubt the people will do their jobs well, but they need the tools.  :wpds_smile: 

Stephen Gray
Stephen Gray
3 days ago

“Up to 40 aircraft”. How many UK aircraft do we have on the two carriers? It’s ok saying they are the most powerful ships ever built for the RN but that is no use if we can’t do anything without the USA giving us permission to lend their men and equipment.

Tommo
Tommo
2 days ago
Reply to  Stephen Gray

It’s the only time The USMC can get a drink at sea when embarked on the QE class

James
James
2 days ago
Reply to  Stephen Gray

At a push we could probably force 15 F35’s onto a carrier currently, the remaining 25 ‘aircraft’ could easily be made up from Merlin, Wildcat and Apache then you have 40 aircraft not needing anyone’s permission to field the carrier.

Stephen Gray
Stephen Gray
2 days ago
Reply to  James

2 carriers, we have 2 carriers not 1. What is the second going to use? That is not even counting a decent escort. Getting 2 of the type 45 destroyers working and manned at the same time as both carriers would need a miracle.

James
James
1 day ago
Reply to  Stephen Gray

Its honestly getting tiring saying this, the reason we have 2 is that 1 is available at all times, it was not a case of build 2 so 2 are available at all times.

Well it was a miracle that 2 T45’s deployed for about 50% of the first world tour then. T23 are being upgraded massively with air defence assets plus T26 is getting close. If needed 2 T45s would be available quite easily,

Last edited 1 day ago by James
Stephen Gray
Stephen Gray
1 day ago
Reply to  James

To keep one active at all times under your scenario would mean no break at all for the airmen or aircraft. We need 2 sets of everything so they get a break too.